76

From experience I'd advise that you should not explain anything (politely or otherwise) when it comes to people wanting you to work for free. Explaining things just gets you into a situation where people (usually people who want everything for free) take it as an invitation to challenge your position regarding payment and licencing which will waste your ...


58

You have, as a professional, received a request from a potential customer. The response from you should be a written quotation stating your price and other commercial terms.


41

If the lighting was asymmetrical and consistent between shots, then the lighting will be flipped as well and this might easily make the shot look simply awful or so awful its funny. This may not be appropriate for their brand.


36

Yes and no. I'm a professional event photographer and I run into this fairly frequently. I don't work a lot of weddings but I do many conferences and other less formal events where there are often other amateur/attendee photographers during an event. A skilled professional will be able to maneuver amongst a crowd including a crowd that involves other ...


32

Event photographers are generally in the business of selling prints, not just snapping photos. They want to sell you the best images they can make, not the raw material for making those images. There may also be some concern that their name will be attached to images that they didn't entirely control: they don't want to be associated with your questionable ...


30

There are no hard and fast rules in art. You are free to follow your heart. If flipping some of the images assists in the symmetry of the final presentation, then go for it! Few if any will recognize their image was flipped. After all, they see a flipped image when they shave or put on makeup. Yes, the dressing, shaving, and makeup image in the mirror is ...


30

Instead of asking us, perhaps you should be asking your client what they would prefer. They're the ones paying you for your services. Be direct with them and tell them the light died faster than you expected and it affected the quality of the photos taken near the end of the session. Give them several options as to how to proceed from the following ...


29

What you're seeking: "an easy way where I would just upload my pictures somewhere and let it go" doesn't exist. If you want to make money, you'll need to invest time and work in making that happen. Let's look at a couple options you mentioned: Stock Photography The stock photo market is flood with pros and amateurs seeking revenue. What sells in stock ...


25

I'd rather not just let the photographer pick the X images that he/she thinks are best to edit and deliver because he/she won't have the same opinion as me as to which images are the best. But you let him pick what equipment he uses, the settings of the camera, the lens, where he points the camera, when he takes an image, etc. It's odd pay somebody to do ...


23

Because unedited / unretouched images do not represent the photographers' best efforts. A wedding photographer is not somebody hired to use an expensive point-and-shoot. The shots they take require editing because there is more information in the RAW file (digital negative) than can be represented in any JPEG image. It's part of the creative process to push/...


19

As somebody who is interested in photography as a hobby -- not a profession, and therefore not worried about making income from it -- I first consider who is asking. I've had a few requests from groups I am happy to support: mostly local parks and local wildlife preserves. I know they have a small budget but as I frequent them (often for free) and get lots ...


18

For commercial use, you have to pay. Period. Maybe not much. If it's for commercial use, the "too poor to pay" line is fiction.


18

I'm a gallery represented photographer and I can tell you what I know. I can see two paths into a gallery, the first is when the gallery owner is already familiar with you work, the second is when they are not. You are lucky if you fit into the first camp, I did. But it isn't all luck. I worked hard to get noticed, I was just lucky in that I got noticed ...


17

This is not a silly post in the matter of an amateur that gets asked to work paying gigs. If your work is satisfactory, it is very common to initially have close friends and family consider you for their photography needs. As word of mouth continues, of course even people outside of your immediate contacts will pick up on your skills and engage in business ...


17

What I did in the end Thank you all for your suggestions and advice. You all really helped me decide what to do. Just to clarify, I wasn't aware that they wanted this before the shoot and they were very happy with the photos, they just wanted some taken from the opposite angle (with the subject turned to the right rather than to the left). In the end I ...


17

If your target market for family shoots is not going to be offended by using a photographer that also does boudoir, then you are probably fine to use the same name. Locale may be a factor here for local area values. It would probably be worth it to have two completely different web sites, as it's incredibly unlikely that your family portrait clients will ...


16

I'm not a photog pro (let alone a Wedding photog pro), but I think that in a world where every phone is a camera, and almost every camera around is a phone, it is non-realistic to put such a phrase ("no other photography should take place during event") in the contract.


16

You absolutely should be paid. And not only that, you absolutely have the right to protect your work. There are dangers associated with offering "free use" of your work, as once you do, you can never really tell how far your work may be distributed "for free". The company you license it to may turn around and license another company to create some design ...


13

OK, this probably isn't what you want to hear, but I've been a professional photographer for more than 15 years now and this speech (or some form thereof) is something I regularly give to my students as this question (or some form thereof) is one of the 'top 5' that I get on a regular basis... If you're looking for super general business advice 'tips' then ...


12

I have a different take on this since I don't derive a living from photography. I do it for fun, personal enjoyment, having the pictures, the challenge, having other people like pictures I show them, etc. What I insist on is being properly credited. I get satisfaction out of knowing other people liked a picture from me enough to publish it, and the ...


12

Portfolio. Build it. Make it better. Repeat. Don't worry about all this other stuff you mentioned. Seriously, no one will take a second look past your portfolio if it isn't excellent. Specifically you asked "how does one start out to become a landscape photographer". The basics are not websites, social media, marketing, etc. The basics are great photos ...


12

Not attributing photos (or any other content) to web addresses is pretty much standard in major print media circles. There are probably a lot of factors involved, but it is likely as much about not promoting another business as much as it is anything else. If you want them to promote your business, I'm sure they would be happy to sell you ad space in their ...


10

I found a graph of Kodak film sales on this page.


10

It sounds like you haven't worked much with models. If not, it'll be an interesting journey. It's convenient to make a broad categorization of models into two groups: 1) Professional models, represented by an agency; and 2) People who model but are unrepresented, part-time, etc. If you want to be reasonably sure your model will be on location when he or she ...


10

Yes it is. In fact, I've seen many photographer contracts for a wedding explicitly call out whether or not the photographer will be getting a meal. I've read on some forums that some photographers require a meal, but I think it's in better to taste to make it an "option" on the contract. If the client said it was okay, then it's okay. Now, of course you ...


10

It certainly is common for this to happen if ground rules are not established. The first thing I would recommend is having at least a simple signed contract between you and your hired help. Make sure that you both know what is and is not allowed with all images that are taken while on the clock, and add that to the contract. Part of the reason that this is ...


9

You are asking a question that is still evolving and for many people is how they gain a competitive advantage over others. Three main opinions exist. Social Media Helps Gain Business This camp is all in, throwing feeds out to multiple services like tumblr, Twitter, Google+, Facebook, etc. Many times they post to one service and have it trickle over to ...


9

There are two things here - there's the balance sheet and there's reality: For the reality part you should plan your cash flow and expenses so you have money for equipment, for example, the top of the line Canon and Nikon DSLRs cost something in the $6000-$7000 range, so if you use them and you replace bodies every 4 years you should make sure to have $7000 ...


9

First off, when I worked as a second shooter, part of my contract was signing over the copyright of those images to XYZ Photography Company. I didn't ask about using images for portfolio usage, but I'm sure the owner would have agreed under other conditions (like watermarks or clearly labeled copyright notices). I was recently approached about photographing ...


8

Sometimes you can piggy-back on a guest taking a photo to get something a little bit different yourself. At the last wedding I shot, I noticed one of the guests taking a portrait shot of the bride and groom on her point and shoot. With my long lens on, and over her shoulder, I focused on the LCD on the back of her camera and, with a wide aperture, took a ...


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