10

According to the online manual, the B on the mode dial will set it to Bulb mode. Have a look at page 24 in this document.


5

Yes you can, but as far as I know, you cannot do it with the 622C alone. You can definitely do it with the addition of a 622C TX. I took a couple of my daughter doing exactly what you want to do. There is a description of how I did it with the photos on Flickr. Full size Another example


5

Get Magic Lantern. Opens up a whole load of neat stuff including an intervalometer. And it's free!


5

The approximate manual camera setting is likely achieved using the tried and true “sunny 16 rule”. Shutter speed is 1/ISO with the aperture set to f/16. Since you have chosen ISO 100, the exposure, according to this rule of thumb is 1/100 (likely you don’t have the 1/100 so we set the shutter @ 1/125 of a second @ f/16. You have chosen to set the aperture at ...


5

The short answer is that your ND filter is not strong enough. As Alan Marcus's answer points out, according to the Sunny 16 rule, in bright daylight at ƒ/16, you will get a nominally-correct exposure when your shutter speed is the inverse of your ISO (i.e., at ISO 100, you should set the shutter to 1/100 s). Setting the aperture at ƒ/22 buys you an ...


5

Regarding Bulb Mode If you use a wired remote there is generally not a time limit regarding the length of an exposure using bulb mode with most current DSLRs. Pressing the button, halfway or fully, on a wired remote is pretty much identical to pressing the camera's shutter button (except you don't physically touch the camera). There have been some DSLRs (e....


4

You can use a wired remote release that has a built in intervalometer, such as this fairly inexpensive one or this one. Regardless of the brand name stamped on them, they all seem to be made identically. You then set the camera to Bulb and let the timer in the remote open and close the shutter.


4

You don't need to buy a wireless remote — you can buy a wired remote. For just a trigger button with a lock (to hold the button down), you can find 3rd party wired shutter releases for under $10 US, such as from Vivitar, Pixel, Vello, and other brands.


4

You can, for very little money, build your own wired remote control, eg. by following these instructions, or any others that a google search for "canon diy remote" brings up. This remote has a momentary action switch, and a two way switch for arbitrarily long exposures. I successfully made such a remote with my own two left hands.


3

The canon 760D has bulb function that you have to hold down, so if I want to do a long exposure I have a wired remote, Shoot RS- 60E3 Wired Remote £3.59, that will lock open the shutter until you release it, if you go back and press the shutter button to close the shutter you could move the camera and spoil your shot.


3

What's the minimum exposure time that can be achieved in bulb mode? Technically, the minimum exposure time is probably limited by the speed that a person can press and release the shutter button (or remote shutter release). I assume this is somewhere on the order of 0.1 seconds (1/10 shutter speed) or so. However, this is highly variable and difficult to ...


3

Yea... you can check out ebay or any local shop that sells camera equipment. You get wired remotes with a display screen that lets u take extremely long exposures (ranging from few seconds to 99 hours). These are best for exposures. Specially long ones. I take milky way shots so i use this remote to avoid any shake in my images.


3

If pulling the cord of the RS60-E3 out of the camera jack solves the problem then the problem is not in the camera, it is with the RS60-E3. What happens if you immediately plug the cord back in? Does the shutter open back up for another exposure? It sounds like the shutter button is just getting stuck and takes a while to fully release. If you only recently ...


3

Bulb mode allows you to control when the exposure starts and finishes, which means that you control the shutter-speed. Together with ISO and Aperture, you still need to balance the 3 parameters and get a proper exposure. See Exposure Triangle if you are not familiar with the concept. To be clear, you do not reduce the shutter-speed to bulb. You take control ...


3

If your hands are not particularly shaky, you may actually get less camera shake from holding down the shutter than you would by releasing it and pressing it again. Basically, with the hold-down method, the possible sources of camera shake will be: two small bumps from slightly moving your finger to press and release the shutter button, motion of the ...


3

Bulb mode holds the shutter open until you close it (or allow it to close). As you said, hold the shutter release down, or use a wireless remote. If you want more precise timing, something like TriggerTrap is what you want.


3

Because it always worked that way. Considering that the mode was mainly for long-duration photography a couple of jiggles at each end of the exposure would not have been noticeable. The word comes from the day shutters were operated by squeezing a rubber bulb - the shutter is open as long as you keep squeezing. Another "because it's always been that way" ...


3

Generally you should use a remote shutter release to hold the shutter open for a prolonged period. This also prevents camera-shake that is usually associated with touching the camera while taking a long exposure. Several options are available from simple lockable switches to complex intervalometers. Each have their own advantages but to get started a cheap ...


3

You can use the time exposure mode as long as you want - at least, until your power source is exhausted. You'll gradually get more noise as the shutter is open longer, from the sensor heating up, so it's seldom done to such extremes. (In the film camera days, very very long exposures, while uncommon, were done much more often than they are done today, e.g. ...


2

If you are in the bulb mode you just need to press the shutter button once on your phone in the camera connect app and it starts the timer and you press the shutter button again in the app to release it. Remember it is Camera connect not EOS remote. The latter is kind of obsolete


2

No, the EOS Remote app does not have a press-and-lock feature for bulb-mode shooting, like, say, the Triggertrap app does. However, the Triggertrap app is unlikely to work for you, either, given that you need two smartphones to use the wi-fi feature for triggering, as well as a camera shutter cable and dongle. Your best bet is, as has been mentioned, to ...


2

Any wired remotes that are compatible with canon cameras will work. Look for one that can lock. I found mine new for less than $15. If you don't want to spend the money, look for an old wired cell phone headset with a 2.5mm stereo jack. cut the wire as far from the jack as possible and strip the end of the wire. Most headphone wires have three wires, each ...


2

If you are using the RC-6 wireless IF remote, the possibility is that its being interrupted when you push it to close the bulb mode, the battery is dying on the remote (not likely if new but possible), or its being pressed for too long to close the shutter and then your camera thinks its time to start a new picture. try setting the camera to single shot and ...


2

Sorry, the P520 will only expose for up to 8S at ISO100. For 200 and 400 it's 4 seconds, decreasing to 1/2 second max at HI1 ~ISO64000) This is very disappointing and is teh weakest aspect of an otherwise excellent camera IMHO.


2

Taking a look at page 78 of the manual as far as I can tell your camera does not have any option to extend beyond 8 seconds in camera. I also don't see an option for a remote control or shutter release that would give that ability. You could(and should) stack multiple 8 second exposures in post processing though. Take a look at this existing question: How ...


2

Your question isn't exactly clear on your objective, so I will provide a few potential solutions. Use your cameras histogram to judge the exposure. See: How and why do you use an image histogram? Calculate the proper exposure. See: What is the "exposure triangle"? or Long Exposure Tutorial Use a neutral density filter. See: What are neutral ...


2

There is a "bulb" setting of sorts on the X-S1 that allows specific shutter times at 1 second intervals to be set. If 15 seconds is too fast but 30 seconds is too long, you can try, for example, 22 seconds or 18 seconds or 20 seconds or 19 seconds until you zero in on what works best. But the longest possible shutter time is 30 seconds (actual exposure time ...


2

I think that firing the flash manually gives you a lot more interesting possibilities than rear curtain sync. If you want to have rear curtain sync, just push the (flash) button at the end of the exposure (just before releasing the shutter button) That being said, you can fire the flash at any time during the bulb exposure. If a dancer jumps, you probably ...


2

Pocketwizard's wiki says you cannot use 2nd curtain together with bulb mode if you are relying solely on the camera to trigger the flash in sync with the second curtain. Because in bulb mode the exposure is terminated by the photographer after an arbitrary period of time, there's no way for the camera to predict when that will be, and therefore no way for ...


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