20

In general you will find a great deal of distaste for bridge cameras here and on most photography forums. In a few unique circumstances they can be good options (very inexpensive super zoom) but for most people they aren't recommended. Sensor size is a big deal Why not get a bridge camera? Since they were introduced and became somewhat popular, the market ...


18

Use more light. Open windows, turn on more room lights, bring in extra portable lights. Use a flash. You say there is "no chance" to use a flash, but since you gave no justification for that it remains valid advice. Added: I just looked at the manual you linked to, and right on the front page it clearly shows a popup flash. A spot light from almost ...


14

I just try to see if there's any stable surface available nearby and try to use it That's the basic idea. Be careful to watch for slight slippage. Also note that vibrations can also affects the stability, including when you trigger the shot - make sure you use a timer so that the vibrations of your touching the camera can subside. I'd use the 10 seconds ...


13

I'll offer a slightly different take: Your current camera is dated, but not really bad. The problems you're having with it, judging by the pictures, are: excessive post processing brightening, which increases noise colour saturation contrast camera shake sensor dirt (visible in the sky on the beach picture) In fact, technically, i like your last picture,...


12

On a tight budget or when you can't use a tripod, bean bags are the way to go. Find a stable surface, place the bag and wiggle the camera around until you are happy with the framing. FYI ordinary shop bought bags of sunflower seeds or lentils or surprise surprise beans work pretty well as a bean bag. Sand is also pretty good but heavy. Stick your choice of ...


9

The first one isn't a setting/exposure issue as there are stripes/lines across the picture. From my technical experience, I'm willing to bet it's a faulty image sensor. If you Google images "faulty ccd", you can see very similar results. This fault isn't necessarily caused by damage to the camera but just simply due to the image sensor failing. Although I ...


9

From the information provided in your comments, it sounds very much like the shutter speed was too low, possibly because your ISO was too low and the subject was moving faster then the shutter, hence the blur. I'd suggest increasing ISO and shutter speed. Point of note. The light may seem OK to a human eye, but an eye is considerably more sensitive then a ...


8

If inexpensive tripods are too expensive, I suggest making your own stable platform. The tripod socket on cameras is 1/4" × 20 thread-per-inch UNC, a.k.a. 1/4-20. (Do not try to use metric, such as M6-1. They are not compatible). Depending on your skills and creativity, you can make something that is entirely suited to how and where you tend to shoot. Maybe ...


8

To understand the difference between a bridge camera and a DSLR, it is really necessary to understand the origin of the term "bridge camera". While a DSLR (digital single lens reflex) is a particular type of camera with a very well defined meaning (it uses a single lens which is used for both exposure and viewfinding), the term "bridge" simply means that it ...


7

There are both similarities and differences in terms of the optics between binoculars and using the longer focal lengths of a Superzoom camera to view distant objects. First, let's look at the similarities: Focal Length. Both the binoculars and the camera use optics to enlarge distant objects. If a binocular has a magnification factor of 10x, that would ...


7

I’m using a bridge camera Fujifilm s7000. This is the root of your problem. The S7000 was announced in 2003, and discontinued in 2005. And while the camera might work just as well as it ever did, digital cameras have evolved significantly over the last 15 years, and that has changed our expectations of what we should be able to do with them. The other ...


7

The only real way to decide is to compare the results from each camera system and decide which set of results you find more acceptable. Comparison can be between actual results you produce yourself with both systems, or comparing the results that are reflected in reviews and tests published by others. What I'm hoping for... is 3000mm of 'useful' zoom. ...


6

One option that won't work for every situation is to take lots of short exposures and combine them in post-processing. You don't need a tripod for this because you can align the images in software before you combine them. Just shoot the images hand-held on burst mode, keeping the camera as steady as you can. You can't get things like light trails from this ...


6

Its got a 40x zoom - so already its going to likely be 'soft'. That's why the don't look sharp. With that much zoom, the aperture also end up really small (f/6.1 and f/6.5) on your pictures respectively - so that doesn't let much light down the lens. To compensate for the lack of light, the camera boosted the ISO to 1600. The ISO 1600 is why the pictures ...


4

Camera optics and binocular optics are inherently different things. The x multiplier on a super zoom is effectively meaningless as it depends on what the shorter focal length is. A 2mm to 10mm lens is a 5x zoom, but it isn't particularly impressive. A 200mm to 1000mm lens on the other hand is also only a 5x zoom, but would be one crazy amount of zoom. ...


3

There is nothing particularly outstanding about this model for travel or landscape photography, but it isn't a bad choice either. It has some advantages such as an "all in one" solution where you don't need to carry multiple lenses, but it still offers a huge optical zoom range by any standard. Is it capable of taking images in as difficult situations as a ...


3

You're mixing up some terminology here, so starting with vocabulary, a "wide angle lens" is one that can go wide and give a you a very large field of view--a lens that takes in the scene. What "25mm wide angle" means is that when you're zoomed all the way out, the field of view you have is equivalent to what a 25mm lens would see on a 35mm film camera. ...


3

What you basically want to looking for in the specs are the macro capabilities of the camera. A bridge camera may or may not be your best choice, here, particularly if you want to handhold the camera for the shots. Bridge cameras (the ones that look like dSLRs and are typically marketed by how big the zoom factor is), tend to trade off reach for low light ...


3

First, you'll have to consider what the main uses of binoculars are: marine military/hunting astronomical theatre In these settings (except theatre, where binoculars tend to be smaller and cheaper), there are several important disadvantages for super-zoom cameras when compared to binoculars: they're generally not as weather resistant nor rugged as ...


3

Maybe. One of the problems with this comparison is that "DSLR" really covers a ginormous range of equipment. I just saw a refurbed Canon T3 with kit lens offered on sale for $300. Can a (good) bridge camera perform as well as that? In a lot of cases, yes. Many bridge cameras have (reasonably) fast lenses and great reach -- both important in sports ...


3

The common things i use my D70 for are : taking pictures of scenery ( castles, towns, forests, waves hitting rocks, etc.. ) , nearby ( < 5m ) persons and objects Being my objective to have a decent, good-zooming (superzoom looks awesome), amateur ( but with manual settings ) camera, What do you need a zoom lens for if you want to photograph people ...


3

Most advanced photographers are quite a bit older than you. They learned photography using a 35mm film camera. Now the 35mm film camera has be around for nearly 100 years, so these serious photographers are also highly familiar with lenses they used with this camera. Time marches on and the majority of digital cameras are smaller than the venerable 35mm ...


3

I would like to mention one more point why P1000 is just marketing product When we select shutter speed we use the rule shutter speed=1/focal length. Based on this (w/o getting in consideration image stabilization, Nikon do not mention it in sense of stops) on 3000mm we should shoot with 1/3000s. Based on Sunny 16 rule and having F8 on 3000mm we should set ...


2

The picture doesn't look very blurry to me, but you are right it is not the sharpest picture either. Have you tried turning down the noise reduction (if the camera offers that feature). Some cameras also let you adjust how much the picture is sharpened. On pictures of buildings you can increase the sharpening going on compared to what you would need on a ...


2

... the problem is the sports mode is too slow Depending on what you mean by "too slow" there are a few settings you can try. But a bridge camera is relatively handicapped in two ways of being slow that probably make a dSLR a better choice for BiF (Bird in Flight) shots. Shutter delay is too slow If by "too slow" you mean that the time between mashing ...


2

There are two speeds of interest - shutter speed and what I'll group as camera speed. The shutter speed is the first - too slow and you'll get blur. Sports mode should be OK for this but if it isn't you'll need to select a shutter speed priority mode and then select a fast shutter time yourself. To start with turn the ISO up to at least 800 and probably ...


2

Conclusion (and response) Following dpollit's great answer, i decided to switch to a newer, better performing sensor-wise DLSR,a nikon D3300, the results (given that i believe my photography skill hasn't changed greatly since my last "trip" with the D70, with the pics i shared on my OP) is really noticeable, using all the different manual settings and with ...


2

With thanks to Roflo for finding the relevant page in the CHDK documentation, I'll state here as an answer that you can with an Alpha version of CHDK firmware extensions for SX410, do manual focus on the SX410. I might say "probably" as I personally can't vouch for that version of CHDK having a working manual focus, but I have used CHDK my self in the past ...


2

As far as I know, there is no "hacked" or modified firmware available for your camera. The most popular firmware, Magic Lantern, is not supported for your camera. Therefore, your only options are to either learn to more about your camera's features and controls, or upgrade to a different camera that allows for manual focusing. In my opinion, you don't need ...


2

I know the EOS has a bigger sensor and more megapixels (12 vs 15) This really isn't an issue. This works out as a mere 11 percent different between the linear pixel counts (i.e. it's 25% extra over the area, but only 11% extra on the side or height). You won't notice that in practice. but the FZ200 has a constant F2.8 aperture through the entire 25-...


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