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Most techniques that are 'properly' accomplished in-camera, but can also be approximated in software, are generally better in-camera. No software filter can replicate the quality of bokeh afforded by a good-quality lens (although Photoshop's Lens Blur filter does a decent job). Having said that, the Brenizer method is relatively time consuming, both in the ...


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I don't use zone plates/sieves so there may be issues related to them that I am not aware of, but in general this question covers the mechanics of taking a good panorama. If you are looking to simulate a wide-angle lens then you will want to ensure that your panorama is substantially larger than you desired final image so that you can crop away the worst of ...


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What is its goal? The main goal of the Brenizer method is to mimic the shallower depth of field you get with a medium or large format camera without using a medium or large format camera. While larger formats do not, inherently, give you shallower DoF, the fact that larger formats yield a wider field of view tends, if you try to compose an image ...


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No, you can't. The panorama mode on your camera is very basic, all it does it roughly stitch the edges. In order to correctly make a Brenizer you need to do a more in depth blending that takes in to account lens distortion and vignetting. That is something that takes a powerful computer a few minutes to do, so your camera certainly wouldn't be able to do ...


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I think the general trick here is luck combined with plenty of frames over a few second timespan and some post processing of the unwanted subjects out. He shot so many images that he was able to pick and choose the frames with the least amount of background distractions(people). It looks like two shadows even were left behind that he either did not have ...


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