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7

One of the most recommended photography books is Bryan Peterson's Understanding Exposure If you haven't read it, I would suggest that book as a start. What are the technical aspects you're after? Peterson's book covers the exposure triangle, metering, use of grey cards, etc. For more technical and in depth coverage of light, read Light: Science and ...


7

The answer is simply: no. Light is a known, measurable quantity, measurable, photons bouncing and hitting film, sensors and eyeballs. You can teach light. You can explain how placing lights in certain positions will give you a certain effect, you generalize as to how most people interpret that light (soft = beauty, harsh = ruggedness, etc). You can talk ...


6

Here would be my topics How to Hold a Digital Camera How to buy the right equipment for you Composure - Some basic rules and how to break them Shutter/Aperture settings - How they affect your shot Depth of field Lighting and Exposure How to use flash What is ISO? How to pre-focus and use auto focus effectively An introduction to White Balance Lenses and ...


6

One approach would be to look at the top questions on this site, and to make sure those things are addressed in a helpful and organized way. You could even reuse the content from here, since all user contributions are licensed under the sharing-friendly Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike license. Translation into local languages is very much a part of ...


6

I'm assuming you are a photographer, and you interact with people. Saying "That one", "good", "extend your leg", "nice", "gorgeous", is part of interacting with people. I don't think any model, not one on the planet, would learn 1000 different names, with 1000 variation levels on each to pose, and to practice that pose to be just the perfect canonical "...


5

While not a collection of exercises, I would suggest the title "Light: Science and Magic" by Fil Hunter, Paul Fuqua, and Steven Biver. It's a classic book that discusses how light moves around a scene to better understand difficult lighting challenges. There are several examples to follow if you want to recreate for your own education. Your local library ...


5

There are couple of them, but you can start with these: Optics in Photography (SPIE Press Monograph Vol. PM06): Explains fundamental optical principles that apply to photography, cameras, and lenses. Intended for professionals and serious amateur photographers as well as lens designers and optical engineers. Contents Perspective Light Rays and Lens ...


5

There is a misconception here, it doesn't matter what camera you use. ISO is ISO, exposure is exposure and shutter speed is shutter speed. Whether the book is written for a 400D and 7D or a 5D MK II is completely irrelevant. There are only three areas where important differences exist: 1) The autofocus 2) Video settings 3) Custom Settings All of the above ...


5

There certainly is a use for his The Negative. It covers light, exposure and the zone system which are relevant to digital. And The Print, which covers post-production in a darkroom has relevance to digital post-processing - can still dodge and burn in Photoshop to bring out the best in a digital "negative" Not to mention those of use who still shoot film ...


4

I've taken a look around and I don't see anything specifically on the rise of Digital Photography, though the topic is lightly covered in various books. This seems to be the best I could find: http://www.amazon.com/Camera-History-Photography-Daguerreotype-Digital/dp/1454900024/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1333057960&sr=1-1 There is also a ...


4

Have you seen Charles Poynton's Color and Gamma FAQs? These probably won't cover all the information that you need for your project, but there you'll find good information (and formulas!) for color models and conversions between them.


4

The book is called Twentysix Gasoline Stations and it was done by Ed Ruscha. It contains 2,5 miles from a Sunset Boulevard area called The Strip. This was done with a automatic camera mounted on a truck. All these were shown in the documentary called "The Genius of Photography".


4

"Henri Cartier-Bresson: The Man, The Image & The World" is a great book. Large prints, good quality and a comprehensive selection. Another book to consider is "Henri Cartier-Bresson: The Modern Century" which was printed to accompany the MoMA exhibit by the same name.


3

I'd second the suggestion of "Light: Science and Magic" it's an outstanding technical manual for how light behaves. If you find that kind of technical explanation too dry or to abstract you may also want to read something a little more hands on. Scott Kelby's "Light It, Shoot It, Retouch It" is good read. I also liked Kevin Kubotas Lighting Notebook. ...


3

As usual with this kind of question, you have to define what you mean by "worth". It's probably (rather: it's surely) not the first book that you should refer to for photography. On the other hand, it is a book of enormous importance in the history of mankind, so it is worth, in the sense that a masterpiece is always worthwhile. In this vein, have you ...


3

For true beginners, Joe McNally's LIFE Guide to Digital Photography covers all the basics in a very readable style. I love his Hot Shoe Diaries and The Moment it Clicks, but not sure they're really good "first books" for someone wanting to learn photography. Tom Ang has also written a number of books, all of which are loaded with images and easy to digest ...


3

If this eBook is targeted towards beginners, please do not make it too technical. I would make sure to cover: Brief History of Photography Introduce Different Genres of Photography (Include Visual Examples of Each) Tools of the Trade (Camera, Flash, Lens, Tripod, etc) Exposure Triangle (Aperture, Shutter & ISO) Composition Conceptual & Creative ...


3

I bought and read "The Portrait Photography Course" by Mark Jenkinson but I did not find it to be nearly as helpful as "Light, Science and Magic", which is the single best photography book I have ever read. Once you understand light and how to use it you will be able to make whatever sort of pictures you want, and I absolutely agree that good portraits ...


3

Some of the best advice I've seen for developing a rapport between photographer and subject is a series that was featured on Strobist written by Sara Lando as a guest on the blog. On photographing people, pt. 1: Before the shooting On photographing people, pt. 2: During the shooting On photographing people, pt. 3: After the shooting Lando concentrates ...


3

A complete tent ought to do, with the light outside. Put a common mirror from around the house on the other side of the tent. You can get ok results using plain white sheets or cloth from a fabric store. So, you need more stuff but not more expense.


3

The easiest way is probably to find reviews of the book and find out what someone else thought about it, and also if the Amazon listing has the "Look Inside!" feature, you could take a turn through at least the table of contents to get a sense of the book's contents.


3

The pictures you want to copy are “halftone” images. The original was fractured into countless dots of ink that either vary in size or vary in spacing or both. The halftone method is the mainstay of how pictures are printed on paper with ink. Halftones are made using an assortment of methods depending on the era. You can identify a halftone by examining the ...


3

First, do not use regular paper on inkjets. The colors will render poorly and the ink will bleed. Inkjet paper has a special surface coating that causes the ink to instantly dry without soaking in. This also gives rich colors and deep blacks. Some printers have special settings for regular paper which limit the ink. Check the driver settings for that. But ...


3

You might try: The Focal Encyclopedia of Photography (Elsevier) Your question is specifically regarding the technical aspects of exposure. Much can be learned from online resources about digital sensors (as the previous poster mentioned) and the history of digital imaging. Relatedly, the YouTube video series "Crash Course Computer Science" is also worth ...


3

Ansel Adams is my hero. He mastered how to intermix the science of photography and the art of photography. I highly recommend reading his books and those about him. In short, he perfected what he called “previsualization”. In other words, study the vista before you shoot the picture. Know in advance the scale of the picture. Should objects in shadow show ...


2

Search out the Rotovision imprint books. There is one specifically on Portrait Photography, but I find Lighting the Nude to be one of the best books in all of photography. Anyone serious enough to ask this question (and invoke "Light, Science, and Magic") can take the lessons it teaches to any form of photography; certainly general portraiture is not that ...


2

It would be worth reading if you are interested in the history of science. It really depends on your interests. You would probably need a reasonable understanding of optics and physiology, so you can appreciate where he's right or wrong. The wikipedia link you gave also has links to english translations. For example, this one: http://www.worldcat.org/title/...


2

I really have stopped using books, I think video's are far superior. If you don't mind paying then take a look at kelby's site, they have linear generalist classes as well as specific technique classes. I agree that the nature of the internet makes it hard to put anything cohesive together, and you never know how good a technique really is. As far as ...


2

For a beginner, I think the Scott Kelby books are probably easiest to understand, and if you don't mind his corny sense of humour, they are well written and organised. The Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 4 Book for Digital Photographers The Adobe Photoshop CS6 Book for Digital Photographers Since you specifically mentioned portraits, his Professional Portrait ...


2

I enjoy books from the publisher Craft & Vision. They are sold directly from their website in PDF. From there you can import it into the Kindle application for easy synchronization. Kelby Training is another publisher that produces great books but are more of the basics of digital photography but they also have a huge repository of training videos. I ...


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