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30

You need a lens. It's probably possible to persuade the camera to expose the sensor without a lens on it, but nothing would be in any sort of focus whatsoever. As an aside, if you're asking this kind of basic question about cameras, I'd question whether a full-frame SLR like the D750 is the right choice. You'll end up spending a lot more on your equipment (...


29

No Canon EOS body needs AF motors because every single Canon EF lens released since the EOS system was introduced since 1987 has a focus motor in the lens. Thus no Canon EOS camera has ever had a need for a focus motor in the body. There are a few manual focus lenses in the EOS system, but they are clearly designated as such by not being named as an EF lens:...


28

You need to upgrade your camera when, and only when, you need a camera that can do something in particular that your current camera can not. This is not only true for your camera body but for your lenses and any other accessories that you might need in order to produce a photo you desire. The specific reasons for upgrading a camera body can be as varied as ...


25

First: please recognize that despite what you may read on click-hungry review sites or fan-fueled forums, every DSLR and mid-to-higher range mirrorless camera on the market will be stellar for the purposes described. Any differences are details — every option is an A and it's then down to arguing over A+ or A++, as well as subjective factors or very ...


25

Short answer because there are many good explanations already: The brightest part of your picture is the background. The brightest part of the second picture is the subject.


17

There is an additional element not taken into account in other answers, the color grading. First, let us compare the two histograms. Here is the kitty one. And here is your photo's As you can see, the kitty's one, even if there are zones that are clearly on a dark shadow, like behind the trunks you do not have any black. This is perceived as a higher ...


15

I don't know what specific model rotary wheel Nikon used in that camera, but moving it fast shouldn't cause any excessive wear. These rotary wheels are usually just rather simple mechanical switches. There are usually two separate switches. Each goes thru one complete cycle each detent, but the two are off from each other by 1/4 cycle. The fancy name for ...


15

No Canon EOS camera has an in-body focus motor. Canon's lens mount is 100% electric, there is no mechanical linkage. (Some mounts e.g. Pentax have a mechanical link for the aperture too, for some lenses). The EF designation of Canon's lenses stands for Electro-Focus - in other words, the focus is driven electronically. Each lens has a built in motor. There ...


14

Pros of using an EVF as opposed to the rear LCD screen: It is easier to see in direct sunlight. Holding the camera to the eye increases stability and comfort (especially with heavier lenses). EVFs offers diopter correction so users don't need to wear eyeglasses.


13

Canon lists the body-only mass of the 60D at 675 grams and the 600D at 515 grams. These numbers are without batteries. Include the batteries and the 60D is the 755g you quote in your question, but the 600D is only 540g. The 60D chassis is polycarbonate resin (plastic) with glass fiber on an aluminum chassis and moderately weather sealed. The 600D chassis is ...


13

No question: adding an external flash. See previous question Prime lens or flash: which upgrade will most improve baby photos?, which covers some of this. A flash can freeze motion, and makes it easy to get enough depth of field to get the whole scene in focus. And when you can move the flash off camera, you can create nice light where it doesn't exist ...


12

Yes, it's possible to capture some kind of images without a lens, but it's not useful. It's like a bike without tires. It's possible to use it to transport yourself some distance, but it's not anything that you would call riding a bike.


12

When you need to. That is the one and only time you need to think about it. If the answer to one or more of these questions is a Yes, then you may want to consider an upgrade... Do you need a shallower depth of field? Do you need a bazillion megapixels? Do you want to use old or specific lenses that require full frame? Is your viewfinder too small? ...


12

You should only upgrade when you need to. Chances are good you won't wait that long or be that sensible. ;) So, basically, to me, it comes down to a few "tipping points" as to when "upgrading" (more realistically you may be sidegrading [e.g., crop to full frame], or expanding [e.g., adding mirrorless to a dSLR rather than replacing it]) has been worth it ...


12

I already have a Nikon D5200 and I I tried so much to get a clear view of the sky and it didn't work so much. The camera you have is a fine one to start with. You should spend some time working on technique before you worry about switching to a different camera. Astrophotography is all about capturing tiny amounts of light compared to daytime photography, ...


11

I followed other's suggestions (wipedown, etc.). Additionally, I put it in a box with a small container of baking soda for a couple of days. Seemed to do the trick.


11

The best way to improve image quality? Learn how to get the most out the gear you already have Please don't misunderstand the following as flippant or taking a cheap shot at a budding photographer. It isn't. It is an encouragement to decide to put in the learning and practice to develop the technique and compositional skills that better images truly ...


10

You want a "body cap". Specifically the Nikon BF-1A or BF-1B, or a generic equivalent. http://www.nikonusa.com/en/nikon-products/product/cap-cover/bf-1b-body-cap.html


10

The second photo is much sharper than the first. This is probably a combination of: A sharper lens. The examples I've seen of the Tamron 70-300mm f/4-5.6 Di LD are not sharp enough to produce the second photo, even when perfect technique is used. Cheap 70-300mm zoom lenses, such as your Tamron, are almost universally softest at 300mm compared to other ...


9

I am going to answer this from the perspective of "want" rather than "Need" which has been handled really well by Michael Clarks answer. Unless you are a Pro and the camera is just a tool, the whole feeling of owning a new camera for enthusiasts and hobbyists, is amazing. Its equal to driving a new car straight from the forecourt. For most enthusiasts, it ...


8

Those controls are made for rapid adjustment. You shouldn't have a problem with using them as quickly as you can accurately make adjustments. I can't guarantee your knob won't eventually fail, but the speed at which you turn it (within practical limits) shouldn't cause any problems for it. Even relatively cheap dials don't have problems with this and ...


8

Yes, you do need a lens. But for starting out, a simple, cheap one will do - and there is a healthy market for used lenses. The best choices would be either a 50mm f/1.8 prime lens, often called "nifty fifty" because for technical reasons it is a very simple lens design that can be made very cheaply while still providing great quality. As a prime lens it ...


8

As a collector of old and sometimes, very smelly cameras, I swear by general household kitchen white vinegar! Equal part vinegar and water, dampen a cloth, and scrub away! You will be surprised! You can also half fill a small desert bowl with white vinegar, and then place that inside a cardboard box on one side with your camera on the other and by morning,...


7

Macro shooters sometimes need to know the distance between their subject and the image (film/sensor) plane, because that's how the minimum focus distance of a lens is measured. The mark gives you an easy way to determine whether you're inside or outside of that distance.


7

There's no standard, or even agreement. Generally, people mean "compared to other cameras of that general class". Or maybe "compared to a sense of all cameras available now" — it depends on the context. The answer may even change over time — a camera may be fast compared to the competition when it comes out, but a few years later be slow compared to the ...


7

overall Canon crop sensor cameras lack in focus and / or sharpening ability when compared to Nikon / Sony / Fuji I think you might be jumping to conclusions here: there are certainly plenty of examples of very sharp photos made with Canon crop sensor cameras. Were that not the case, there wouldn't be much market for the Canon 7D and 7DmkII, for example. The ...


6

According to Nikon's web site, there's some metal under that plastic. The magnesium alloy employed for the top and rear covers endows the camera with high robustness and durability, despite its compact, lightweight body. The body is effectively sealed at various locations, ensuring weather-resistance and dust-prevention performance. Although I wasn't ...


6

I think your premise is basically flawed. Every DSLR maker gives a fancy marketing name to their processor chain and hypes it in press releases for new cameras. For example, Canon calls theirs "DIGIC", and touts it as part of a their digital trinity (the other two parts being designed-for-digital lenses and the sensor). The Canon DIGIC 5+ Image ...


6

Your Promaster Pentax-mount lens will work with any modern Pentax DSLR*. Your older manual Pentax lens will too, but you will need to push a button to take a meter reading - they won't meter continuously. That's also the case with the XR Rikonon. Some older Rikoh lenses are dangerous to use on Pentax DSLRs, but this one will be fine. But, these are also ...


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