36

The sale price of film is going up because of “economy of scale”. In other words, the more you make of any particular article, the lower the cost to make that article. Digital imaging has overtaken film imaging and this movement continues at a rapid pace. Thus as film sales drop, the cost to manufacture goes up. It is as simple as that!


15

Here’s Fuji’s annual report: https://www.fujifilmholdings.com/en/pdf/investors/integrated_report/ff_ir_2018_all.pdf The page you want is page 48. What you should notice is that photo imaging made up 15.7% of the business - to which photo imaging revenues were roughly 2/3. While imagine revenues have shown increases from 2014, they also appear to be ...


9

Just to expand on Matt's answer a bit. Most B&W films used during the first half of the 20th century were not panchromatic. They were much more sensitive to the energy in blue light than the energy in red light. Even if a panchromatic film were used, if a blue filter were placed in front of the camera's lens, it would reduce the amount of red light ...


7

I've re-thunk this since first posting ;) Best guess is he just used natural light, not through his kitchen window, as I initially had assumed, because he states he didn't take it to the kitchen. However, in the 1920s I would assume an artist would have an artist's loft*, with high, broad natural light... & a photographer would use one too, for ...


6

Photo films and digital sensors do not record colors exactly as seen by our eye / brain vision system. Initially, photo films were only sensitive to the violet and blue region of the visual spectrum. Translated, films blackened when exposed to violet and blue. They did not blacken when exposed to any other colors. The resulting black & white prints ...


5

The images on gelatin-silver film and prints are formed by silver particles. The images on color (chromogenic) film and prints are formed by color dyes. There are also chromogenic black and white films that are developed using the standard C41 color process, but use black and white dyes to form the image. Modern commercial chromogenic and silver-gelatin ...


5

In addition to economy of scale as mentioned, environmental protection obligations are certainly not becoming less - and it is called "chemical film" for a reason. There will certainly be some harmful chemical waste left after making film. Also, while exposed and developed film in household/commercial quantities might be considered normal bin-able household/...


5

Revenue maximisation and lack of competition: Especially with Ilford, it is very obvious that they are pricing their products based on willingness to pay in a certain market. Ilford products are e.g. significantly cheaper in the US or UK compared to mainland Europe. If you want 4x5″ 100ASA tabular grain black and white sheet film, your only two options ...


5

Before making assumptions on monochromaticity with LED lights that aren't built for this purpose, test and/or measure. LEDs are often overdriven, and/or allowed to get reasonably hot, and/or used in pulsed modes in these applications. All this can affect their spectral behaviour (compared to datasheet values) a lot.


5

Are any of these in the ballpark? The last one: "imperfect chemical film response". Most black and white processes are not "panchromatic". That is, it does not respond the same way across the whole color spectrum. Ever see darkroom with a red "safe light"? That's what's going on here.


4

When I look this photo I think that something is wrong. It looks a little flat. That's what you want in a negative (or raw digital file) because it can contain the most amount of information all the way from dark to light. But in most cases, you want to add a little contrast when you print it or otherwise prepare it for viewing. In the film age this was ...


4

You need to remember that film is a step in the process - it's not the end. Whether you are printing in a darkroom or scanning and editing, you'll be making adjustments to the image and then printing or finalizing for on-screen viewing. When creating the negative, your goal is to compress as much tonal range into it as possible so that your highlights are ...


4

It does not entirely do justice to the film, nor reveal potential problems with your developing routine, to judge from the output of a flatbed scanner such as the V800. For a more reliable assessment of negative quality, you should examine the negatives directly. Use a light table and a loupe with ~10x magnification to view the negatives. It takes some time ...


4

Photos taken in... shutter priority... Overcast but bright day. You probably underexposed the image. Since digital images can be "corrected", you will need to examine the film density directly to determine exposure. Other possible issues: Did you check whether the shutter and meter in your "re-discovered" AE-1 are fully functional? Was the film expired? "...


3

Beware of red LEDs that are based on blue LED chips + red phosphor, they may still emit a fair amount of blue light. I don't know how many there are out there, just saying. Same for amber/yellow LEDs, they may be fantastic, or they may be useless. https://www.google.com/search?q=led+darkroom+safelight = 42100 results.


3

Ansel Adams is my hero. He mastered how to intermix the science of photography and the art of photography. I highly recommend reading his books and those about him. In short, he perfected what he called “previsualization”. In other words, study the vista before you shoot the picture. Know in advance the scale of the picture. Should objects in shadow show ...


3

Rodinal is a good one, my personal favorite. The 100 ml "Baby" Rodinal from Adox is an especially good choice for infrequent developing; the small packaging lasts only for a couple films (whether it is good or ill depends on your volume). Just to give you more options you might consider Ilford HC and / or Kodak HC 110. Both of these (the "difference" ...


2

Make sure that you're agitating correctly. Inversions should be somewhat abrupt. I invert five times in five seconds every thirty seconds (i.e. five seconds of agitation, 25 seconds of sitting, then repeating). Ten seconds of agitation at the start of every minute should work pretty much as well; I know some home processors use this style instead. I've ...


2

I would say that using a scan from any scanner to evaluate a negative is disingenuous and not the proper way to make a true assessment. A digital copy of an analog does not represent the true analog. Use a loupe, your eyes, knowledge gained from study and experience on proper density and from printing from lots and lots of negatives. One of the most ...


2

The photo looks okayish. There is little detail in the lows (tree trunks) but that is to be expected given the overall contrast of the scene. With basic Lightroom techniques / Variable Contrast printing & some dodging and burning (depending on the kind of workflow you prefer) you should get very solid results. As you seem to be taking your process ...


2

There is no “best” developer for any black and white film. There are dozens and dozens and dozens of different developers each with their own characteristics. With that being said there are some developers that work with some films better than others. The key is doing research and experimenting with different developers to facilitate finding the ...


2

Y' in (Y',Cb,Cr) is called the Luma component, and on its own it represents a reasonable black and white image. But Y' is not an accurate representation of the actual Luminance; for blue and red objects its value is way too low. This is described as the Constant Luminance Error. For a better result the order of some operations must be changed; the wrong ...


2

You can simulate the spectral response with filters. To cut red, use a cyan or blue-green filter. To select for blue or green, use a blue or green filter. If you can find the response curve of the films you're interested in, you can look for corresponding filters. Otherwise, you should shoot some test rolls to compare filters against. You can see ...


2

Use Rodinal. The last bottle I emptied had been opened for at least 15 years and kept at room temperature without any protective measurements.


1

Developing black-and-white film as color (C41 or E6) is usually expected to produce blank negatives because the bleach step removes the silver and leaves behind only dye. Black-and-white film has no dye to leave behind. A partial bleach might leave a faded looking image. Skipped bleach might look like normal black-and-white processing. (These are guesses ...


1

For what it is worth: The noise pattern you've got looks a lot like matte beads. These are micro-plastic beads added to film emulsions to keep the emulsion 'bumpy' and not sticking to film/scanner/print. It's only on the gelatin side, not the base, and depending on the light source can significantly become visible. Since the beads are chosen NOT to be ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible