25

Upon viewing his portfolio at the link you provided, my first thought was push processing. In push processing, one typically underexposes the shot (that is, meters and set exposure as if the the film were a higher ISO than it really is), then compensate in the darkroom by overdeveloping the film to account for the underexposed shot. Push processing tends to ...


23

If you want to achieve this digitally note how the whites aren't full white and the blacks aren't full black. You can do that e.g. in Lightroom or any other editing tool by pulling the endpoints for the highlights and shadows towards the middle. To get a creamy tint, select the RGB Blue-Channel and reduce the Highlights-max Point. This bumps up the yellow:...


9

If those were film images, I'd say they were "overexposed" by about one stop and developed at N-1 (pull 1) to ensure well filled shadows. They may also have been printed on a warm-tone paper, and the prints preflashed to rein in the whites. Presuming they're digital in origin, it's likely filters with similar results were applied in post Generally, this ...


9

Just to expand on Matt's answer a bit. Most B&W films used during the first half of the 20th century were not panchromatic. They were much more sensitive to the energy in blue light than the energy in red light. Even if a panchromatic film were used, if a blue filter were placed in front of the camera's lens, it would reduce the amount of red light ...


6

Photo films and digital sensors do not record colors exactly as seen by our eye / brain vision system. Initially, photo films were only sensitive to the violet and blue region of the visual spectrum. Translated, films blackened when exposed to violet and blue. They did not blacken when exposed to any other colors. The resulting black & white prints ...


5

Are any of these in the ballpark? The last one: "imperfect chemical film response". Most black and white processes are not "panchromatic". That is, it does not respond the same way across the whole color spectrum. Ever see darkroom with a red "safe light"? That's what's going on here.


3

What you were told is not correct... it's backwards (or maybe you misunderstood?). The human response to light is ~ logarithmic; it takes ~ 2x as much brightness/luminance to cause the same perceptual change in tonal value. That's why "exposure" is logarithmic as well. I.e. a human is most sensitive to smaller changes in darker tones. But at extreme dark ...


3

With selective grade contrast papers and a variety of film processes you can achieve these results. I don't know if there's negative combinations or pre-flashing of the paper, but all of these are easily achieved in the darkroom after a couple of weeks of practice. I hate to say it but these appear to be pretty simple- so the fact that they're interesting ...


3

Rodinal is a good one, my personal favorite. The 100 ml "Baby" Rodinal from Adox is an especially good choice for infrequent developing; the small packaging lasts only for a couple films (whether it is good or ill depends on your volume). Just to give you more options you might consider Ilford HC and / or Kodak HC 110. Both of these (the "difference" ...


2

Use Rodinal. The last bottle I emptied had been opened for at least 15 years and kept at room temperature without any protective measurements.


2

The point behind shooting a film at box speed and developing with recommended dilutions, agitations, and time is consistency. If your film is properly exposed, then doing everything by the box will yield usable images. Anytime you deviate from the recommended process, you are experimenting. As with all experiments, you should change a single variable at a ...


2

View this Leica blog and look at his negatives. He used a lot of TriX 400. The idea is exposing for the right things. He exposes so that the shadows are all dark. You can certainly bring the highlights up in post processing, but look for high contrast light - noon light and shadows. https://www.leica-camera.blog/2015/08/12/renato-dagostin-coast-to-coast-...


2

Another option is to shoot through colored filters. Back in my "I'm going to be a real photographer!" phase (before I realized I had absolutely no talent for it), I shot a lot of B&W through various filters to enhance or reduce contrast. Red filters darken blues (making white clouds stand out against a blue sky), green filters darken oranges (bringing ...


2

Along the x-axis of the histogram is the color intensity. Along the y-axis, are the frequency of the corresponding values. The histogram of a gradient is expected to be flat. The appearance of the histogram you've shown curves upward at either end. This is likely associated with how the software you are using generates it. Behind the scenes colorspace or ...


1

If you can read the edge markings on the film, your development worked, at least to some extent (half time with Caffenol may be a bit short -- C-41 film in Caffenol will generally come out pretty dense because the orange mask adds to the fog/stain from the coffee). Given this, if your frames are completely clear, your camera's shutter may not have fired, or ...


1

You need to look at your negatives. Scans mean nothing. Your film should have rich blacks and film base clear areas. If the whole image is 'thin' (meaning under-exposed) then the scans will be made in such a way to try and capture as much detail without blowing them out. Basically, you need the source material, not the end result. If you want to post a ...


1

For what it is worth: The noise pattern you've got looks a lot like matte beads. These are micro-plastic beads added to film emulsions to keep the emulsion 'bumpy' and not sticking to film/scanner/print. It's only on the gelatin side, not the base, and depending on the light source can significantly become visible. Since the beads are chosen NOT to be ...


1

There are two aspects to that: The coatings (or maybe even choice of optical glasses) will have been made in a way that makes them relatively color-neutral. Do not forget that film had a fixed white balance. Some early lens coatings (single coating era) create a noticeable blue or yellow color cast. As mentioned in other answers, chromatic aberration will ...


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