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53

Why are hardware-based manipulations, like black and white photography (traditionally using black-and-white film), long exposure, etc., which also result in an "unnatural" image, acceptable while software-based manipulation (like HDR) is frowned upon by the photography community? Differences from human perception that are due to limitations of the medium ...


36

The sale price of film is going up because of “economy of scale”. In other words, the more you make of any particular article, the lower the cost to make that article. Digital imaging has overtaken film imaging and this movement continues at a rapid pace. Thus as film sales drop, the cost to manufacture goes up. It is as simple as that!


30

Pardon me while I get a little metaphysical for a bit. "Color" as we understand it isn't a real property of anything in the universe. It's something created by our vision system — a complicated interaction in our eyes and brains. It's useful for things like "don't eat the poison berries", "look at that tiger over in the grass", and, more recently, "stopping ...


27

The story goes that Ansel Adams came up with the "18% gray" figure. Back in the hay day of film photography he was developing the zone system and needed to define a "middle gray". It was a judgment call. Eventually, the idea caught on, but film and camera companies picked their own middle gray. It is a fun fact that your digital camera probably uses ...


21

Is it frowned upon? Photography has always made use of whatever technology was available, whether in the camera, the darkroom or, now, the computer. It's a long time since other forms of art were required to be 'photorealistic'. No need for photography to be either! If you find yourself among people who disagree, work within their rules if you find ...


20

Yes, if you shoot RAW. If you have difficulty visualizing an image in B&W, shooting in B&W gives you a good approximation of the final image at the time of shooting so you can adjust; many digital cameras can even process B&W with color filters, so if you have a particular type of processing in mind, such as using a red filter to darken skies (...


20

Ilford Delta is a pretty common film. I am certain you will be able to find a reputable lab to develop it somewhere around (you do not mention where exactly in Germany are you spending your year). On the other hand, you should not have a problem developing it yourself in a years time. To maximize your chances you should keep it cold - in a fridge, or even ...


19

There are several effects going on here. The water effect must be done in camera, with a very long exposure. Probably during dusk or at night otherwise you'll have too much light, even with a strong ND filter. The black and white conversion can be done in camera if shooting JPEG but is better done in post. The gradient in the sky is either done with a ...


19

No. It is not possible to create a physical filter that can completely "De-saturate" incoming light. The only way to achieve this without post-processing is at the film / sensor level.


18

It's worth looking at a gamma chart for additional perspective as you think about this. Standard display gamma, for example, is 2.2. The curve looks like this: 50% grey, in an 8-bit space, is 127 (horizontal axis). This lines up with ~20% luminance output of the display. Both for display and print the concept of gamma is important as it provides the ...


18

It sounds like what you're looking for is JPEG2000. It has a range of options including a 16-bit lossy compression and better compression ratios than JPEG. It hasn't been as widely adopted as hoped (for a host of reasons) and may have some patent issues that might make it difficult to use in certain situations but otherwise it fits your needs. Personally ...


17

The biggest advantage is that you get 3X more light sensitivity. With a bayer filter, every photosite gets 1/3 of the light that falls on it because the filter blocks 2/3 of incoming light to filter for one primary color. So the sensor becomes more sensitive to light. That means that less amplification of the read-out signal to get the same ISO as with a ...


16

Its been a very long time, but I believe this is caused by inadequate rinsing of the negative during processing. The film has a coating to reduce light reflecting from the film backing itself. It is usually rinsed away, but seeing a slight purple tinge on negatives is likely very familiar to those who have developed their own B&W film. The coating is ...


16

All color is a result of software processing. The only thing a sensor, be it film or semiconductor, can do is change state in response to incoming photons. Yes, a digital camera has color filters, but all they do is restrict the wavelengths which are passed to the sensing pixels. The output of each pixel is simply a bunch of electrons, which are then ...


15

If this image were RAW, the color would still be there. But since it is JPEG, I'm afraid not. The fact that the image is in RGB format does not help, because I'd you look, you will find that in fact for each pixel, each of these values is set to the same thing: (0,0,0), (37,37,37), (221,221,221), or whatever. That is, they're all gray levels, just ...


15

Here’s Fuji’s annual report: https://www.fujifilmholdings.com/en/pdf/investors/integrated_report/ff_ir_2018_all.pdf The page you want is page 48. What you should notice is that photo imaging made up 15.7% of the business - to which photo imaging revenues were roughly 2/3. While imagine revenues have shown increases from 2014, they also appear to be ...


14

For the budget? Go digital, but don't worry about those monochrome sensors. Sure, they're strictly better in terms of per-pixel awesomeness, but even entry-level DSLRs and mirrorless cameras have high enough resolution to make up for it — especially if your comparison point is 35mm film. And the color information let's you easily make color filter choices in ...


14

Traditionally a price factor, but not anymore. The idea that you should shoot only black and white as a beginning "serious" photographer is both highly subjective and highly restrictive, especially in a world where colour comes at no cost. If you are shooting film and doing your own darkroom work, then there is a distinct price advantage to shooting in ...


14

Long exposure astrophotography is often done with a monochrome sensor to maximize the number of photons captured from a faint source. Relatively short exposures with separate Red, Green, and Blue filters are sufficient to color the image, but the longer unfiltered channel provides more detail in the structure of what's being imaged. You can replicate the ...


14

There is a really important diference if you are using film or is a digital photo. I will focus on Digital aspects but will give you an idea of what to expect with film. The method I am using is simply using the primary channel of a colour RGB image. Let me start with primary light colors RGB. As the skin has more red component the skin will look brighter ...


14

I would not worry overmuch about the color schemes. Two reasons: the emulsions you mention (Bergger and HP5+) are panchromatic, in both cases with rather decent color rendition your scenes will be static, so if and when you decide to alter the color rendition you can do so with classical B&W filters (the classical sequence of light yellow, dark ...


13

It's something else. Your photograph appears to be split toned. That simply means that the image wasn't completely bleached out before the sepia toning was done; a pale, low-density silver print, mostly of the shadows, would have still been visible. That gives considerably more depth to the shadows than a "pure" sepia-toned print, where the darkest darks ...


12

When using B&W, you have decided that the colors are suppressing the subject and you want the viewer to concentrate on geometric's. But this is strictly decided by the photographer eye. A more detailed article about this subject can be found here


12

You can't add a physical filter, but you can remove a physical filter to convert any digital camera to a strictly monochrome camera. The actual sensor on any DSLR knows nothing about color - each pixel records the total luminosity in all the wavelengths it's sensitive to. The way color is introduced is by adding a Bayer filter, which is basically small ...


10

If you are using a digital camera, there is little need to use colored filters, as you can apply their effects in post processing when you do the black and white conversion. See Are there reasons to use colour filters with digital cameras? Also How can using a color filter help to improve a black and white photo? If you are shooting film, then Red is ...


10

The look you are after is dependant on lighting and post processing rather than lenses. You want to shoot with soft but directional lighting so create strong textures within your image, directly sunlight through hazy cloud is good for this. As is the "magic hour". In post you need to blend the colour channels looking for the most contrasty mix. Then its a ...


10

Shorter version: Expose it as 3200 and shoot normally. Develop according to the instructions and make sure you use the correct development time for 3200. Longer version: Delta 3200 is not an ISO 3200 film, it is more like ISO 1000-1200. If you expose it as 3200 and develop according to the instructions, you are actually push developing it. The film ...


10

The image has some highlights where there is some blue mixed in, where there is otherwise only information in the red and green channels. It's those highlights that doesn't balance well when you desaturate the image. You can use the Channel Mixer in Monochrome mode to convert the image, that allows you to balance the channels to avoid the posterising. ...


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