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21

Well, in order to get good results, you'll have to make the plunge into non-auto settings. I'd recommend Manual mode. The problem you're running into here is that you are pointing your camera at a bird in the sky, which is bright. Camera meters are set up to try and make every exposure a uniform grey in terms of brightness. So if you point your camera at ...


20

Several possibilities: In the examples shown, it could be a problem with the subject. The center of the picture is a rather fuzzy plumage for the dove and sharp lines for the white-eye. Your 55-250mm is not so sharp at the long end. Decent lens, but not built/checked to stringent specs like a L series. Only way to tell is to try another lens. Your camera's ...


11

Your example is made up of images from two different situations. It is extremely likely that no lens / camera on earth could achieve the sort of image shown in that situation without "cheating" by using some sort of processing - and probably multiple images - to deal with bar removal. You CAN achieve extremely good results when you have control over where ...


11

Bird photography is challenging, because birds are fast-moving subjects. Action points for you (based on my personal experience): Make the shutter speed as fast as possible Because of that, you will be tempted to shot with a maximum aperture. Don't take pictures on wide-open aperture, however. Close it a bit (for 1 stop at least). Lenses are softer wide-...


7

As someone who occasionally indulges in bird photography, shoots micro four-thirds, and has adapted manual lenses to her Canon dSLRs, I'd say don't do it. The lens will be disproportionately big and heavy compared to your G5, and the lack of autofocus (and EXIF, and aperture control from the body unless the lens has an aperture ring) will probably be more ...


7

I wrote about this on my blog recently: http://www.chuqui.com/2013/06/getting-started-in-bird-photography-choose-your-weapons/ For someone getting started, it's not really true that you need a big, heavy, expensive camera set any more. There are some really nice, moderately priced cameras with what are called "superzoom" lenses. There are limitations to ...


7

Easiest fix Only shoot the bird when the sun is at your back, not behind the bird. Given how redtails circle where I am, I sometimes just wait as I draw a bead and follow them around the circle, to where the light is falling on them nicely. However. This will be rarer than backlit opportunities, because a hunting hawk doesn't like to fly into the light ...


5

I've been a professional long-lens bird/nature shooter since the 80's. I used to use very big and pricey dedicated video cameras/lenses, but now have found the wonderful micro-4/3 world and love it. I've gotten some amazing shots, both video and stills, by adapting older long telephoto lenses to my Panasonic G6 and GH3, as well as my Olympus E-PL5 and E-M5 ...


5

What lens would work for a canon 6D to take up close photos of birds far away in the trees? It comes down to three questions: How up close do you want to get? How far away are the trees? How big are the birds? In landscape orientation, your 400mm lens takes in 3.4 degrees over the height of the sensor and 5.2 degrees across the width. That means that a ...


5

This is nothing to do with your settings; you just need a longer focal length - or in other words, a new, bigger, heavier, significantly more expensive lens. As a very rough rule of thumb, you'll want a focal length of around 400mm (full-frame equivalent) in order to do birding shots, or a lens which can go to about 250-300mm taking into account the 1.5x ...


4

Here is a relevant 1:1 snippet from near the middle: Nothing looks out of expectation here. You can definitely see the softness of the lens a bit, and it looks like the picture was overexposed. The lens sharpness for this detail with this size sensor is reasonable enough. The overexposure is making the tops of the flamingos look more white than pink. ...


4

I shoot both a Canon 50D and the micro four-thirds G3 and GX7. I use my 50D/EF 400mm f/5.6L USM combo for bird in flight shots. For me, the difference is chalk and cheese at the speed of reaction I have to have to get a BiF shot. The G3 with my 45-200 OIS are perfectly capable of taking perched/walking bird shots, though, as you suspected. G3+45-200 ...


3

It's NOT (only) the exposure. This situation calls for more than the correct exposure which you will discover if you are able to bracket your exposures to select the one with the subject optimally exposed. No matter which one you choose from among the series, it will not show the plumage correctly. Why? The bird you illustrate against a clear blue sky has ...


3

I you're going to be standing on the ground with cages on poles like in the image you posted then you're out of luck. In order to throw the cage bars out of focus to the extent to which they don't show up in the image your lens will have to be very close to the cage (touching if possible). You'll need a wide aperture lens with a fairly close focusing ...


3

A crop camera (1.6x) and Sigma's "Bigma" lens (50-500mm), would get you a respectable 800mm reach and value. In the end, learning bird behavior, approach techniques, and perfecting your patience are probably going to be the best benefit no matter your gear.


3

Switch the camera to using a single auto-focus spot in the middle of the frame. Most high end cameras have this capability. I don't know if your Sony camera can do that or how it will show you the spot if it does, but look around the owners manual. On my Nikon, the autofocus spots are shown as small red rectangles in the viewfinder. You point the spot at ...


3

You might find that applying some fundamental photography techniques will help you select settings that are most appropriate for the subject and situation. For example, for Bison, I wanted a narrow DOF, so I could just focus on the Bison - so I shot at f/2.8 and focused on his eyes. I believe you may encounter Elephants at you park. So, you could use that ...


3

AI Servo in and of itself only means the camera is continuously focusing where it has been told to focus. It doesn't mean the camera will necessarily track a subject across the frame. To accomplish that you need to select an appropriate AF Case and AF Area choice from within the AF Configuration Tool (under the AF1 tab) in your camera's menu. The 7D Mark II ...


3

Now that we finally have enough information to accurately answer the question: Mostly the differences aren't about your lens, they're about the light. There are several differences between the two images that cause the first to look less "sharp" than the second. Although both were taken with your lens at 250mm, you cropped the first tighter than ...


3

Ignoring the specific lenses here, the question you're really asking is "which is better, a general purpose 'superzoom' lens or a dedicated telephoto lens?" The answer to that is of course "they're different": The superzoom lens (18-200 in your case) has the advantage that it has a very wide focal length range; it can do everything from ...


3

Straight up, I should mention that I am not a bird photographer and do not have much experience in this area. Hopefully someone with more experience can offer an answer with more specifics. Preferred Zoom Range However, the bird photographers that I know all seem to gravitate toward use of 150-600mm zoom lenses (that ... and techniques to allow them to get ...


2

Expanding on chuqui's answer slightly, Roger Cicalia of LensRentals.com did a comparision of a high-end digiscope (Swarovski) against some high-end Canon lenses in 2012. Summarising the results briefly: In the centre of the frame, the sharpness of the digiscope compares well with the sharpness of the Canon lenses. Away from the centre of the frame, the ...


2

Bird photography is the kind of situation where you have to select one of the auto-focus point (usually the center one). With such setting, you have a better control where the focus is done (as the camera will not switch between the focus-points). Furthermore you do not really care if the subject is right in the center of the image as, most of the time, you ...


2

It depends on the camera, but in general, even a basic PDAF should be light years ahead of CDAF for any kind of action shot. The problem with CDAF is that it is a guess and check approach. The camera can't tell that it is in focus unless it tries going too far to one side and then too far to the other. For a still object, this works ok, but when the ...


2

Warning: I have not tried this and don't know if it'll really help much. Either going full manual, or setting an Auto mode to overexpose by a stop may help. Then, consider adding both a polarizing filter and a yellow filter to darken the sky background as much as possible without significantly mucking with the spectrum from the bird.


2

... the problem is the sports mode is too slow Depending on what you mean by "too slow" there are a few settings you can try. But a bridge camera is relatively handicapped in two ways of being slow that probably make a dSLR a better choice for BiF (Bird in Flight) shots. Shutter delay is too slow If by "too slow" you mean that the time between mashing ...


2

There are two speeds of interest - shutter speed and what I'll group as camera speed. The shutter speed is the first - too slow and you'll get blur. Sports mode should be OK for this but if it isn't you'll need to select a shutter speed priority mode and then select a fast shutter time yourself. To start with turn the ISO up to at least 800 and probably ...


2

I know what you mean about the big lens still not getting close enough. Tips though include: Set up an area if you can with a bird feeding station. Manage the type of food offered and the overall placement against a nice background. Although the 6D is your A camera, ideally your B camera could be placed on a tripod next to a feeder ready to be remote fired....


2

You either need a longer lens (>400mm) or a telephoto extender. Telephoto extenders are a less expensive way to get additional "zoom" from your lens, but the image quality will not be as good.


2

Your 7D Mark II plus Tamron 150-600mm lens weighs in at just under 7 pounds. Add a battery grip and a second battery and you're over 7 pounds. You must then factor in the use case and consider that the camera and lens will not be static, but in motion when tracking your subject. I would recommend that whatever tripod and head you choose be rated for at least ...


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