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13

The general/umbrella term is using camera movements. A tilt/shift (or perspective control) lens for an SLR is a very limited way of bringing such movements to a type of camera that doesn't natively have them. Rail-type view cameras usually have a full suite of movements available; field cameras (flatbed view cameras that usually fold up into a sort of carry ...


12

I think you are talking about the 4x5 Graflex Speed Graphic that David Burnett was shooting with. http://www.lomography.com/magazine/lifestyle/2012/08/09/david-burnett-an-analogue-view-of-the-olympics


7

It's David Burnett, he was recently seen photographing the 2012 London Olympics with his Graflex Speed Graphic http://www.lomography.com/magazine/lifestyle/2012/08/09/david-burnett-an-analogue-view-of-the-olympics Here's a great video of him going through his bag and talking about his gear: https://vimeo.com/13036394


5

Absolutely, I've done this. The image does get dimmer though so you'll need to adjust your exposure accordingly. I've only toyed with it since much of my interest is in wide, not tele photography.


4

Only if you prefer the ease of use with folding bellows as compared to bag bellows. Bag bellows can be prone to sag in a way that partially blocks some of the light from the lens. Depending on the type and number of movements used, it may not always be obvious from just a cursory look if part of the bag is in the light path or not. They're also fussier to ...


4

First of all, you probably do not want to use a bellows with your Canon EF lenses. The reason for this is simply that the lenses are all-electronic so you cannot change the aperture once the lens is on the bellows... unless the bellows are electronically compatible with the EF mount and I seriously doubt that such an animal exists. However: The nice thing ...


4

Well, the most extreme macro lens in production is, as far as I know, the Canon MP-E 65mm. It offers up to 5x magnification and is not an easy beast to master. At 5x magnification, it would still have to be a pretty darn big fly if its face were to fill a 24x36mm full-frame sensor, or even the 16x24-ish one on a crop camera. In other words - kit that ...


3

Using this Extension Calculator it looks like it may be difficult to find a bellows with the amount of extension you need. To achieve 5:1 magnification with a 100mm lens, you need to have a lens extension of approx 400mm or 15 inches. You will also need a bellows that has electrical contacts so that you can control the aperture on your Tamron lens. ...


3

At a distance this dual camera arrangement from here used by Getty Images to capture 3D footage may have looked large and/or strange. The article talks about a single system but seems to also include footage without any real discussion of a robotic camera which appears far closer to what you described. This appears to be a 35mm DSLR (probably 5D MkIII ...


3

Yes, a bellows set should be able to give you 1:1, unless it's too deep when collapsed. In that case, it's not that you can't get up to 1:1, but that you won't be able to get down to 1:1 with the lens nominally adjusted to infinity focus; your magnification will always be greater than 1:1. In both cases (the dedicated Adaptall extension tube and the bellows) ...


3

Assuming your bellows just allows extension, and does not offer tilt or shift capabilities...then that's all you really get, extension. If your bellows is a full-freedom bellows with tilt and shift (and maybe even rotation) capabilities, then the answer to your question is probably more complex. With greater extension (elongation of the bellows), you reduce ...


3

This will work for a pinhole camera, within limitations, but zone plates actually have a certain focal length, so it won't there. (Of course, zone plates tend to have a very large depth of field, and aren't particularly sharp anyway, so in the real world you may have some latitude.) For a pinhole camera, there is an ideal pinhole size (for every wavelength ...


2

In addition to Esa Paulasto's suggestion, you can use a combination of telephoto and reversed wide-angle lens to do macro. I found that a 28mm reversed and added to a 200mm lens gave me 5.2x magnification (I photographed a ruler with this arrangement and computed the magnification). But as Staale S says, you will need bright lighting since you need to stop ...


2

The white plastic pieces don't look like they belong. When comparing your photos to my Crown Graphic, the bed and rails appear the same but I definitely don't have anything that looks like the white pieces in your photo.Your hinge doesn't appear to be out of alignment, so I'm thinking that someone placed something under the inner section of railing to shim ...


2

As a previous owner of a Nikon PB-6 bellows unit, I remember from the manual that Nikon did recommend using macro lenses with the bellows unit. I don't see why a non-macro lens would not work with a bellows unit, but you will certainly be able to get even closer to your subject with a macro lens (if that matters for the type of macro shots you have planned). ...


2

The photographer was just tilting/shifting the lens to change the way the imaging circle would be recorded. The bellows are not being "twisted". If you look at the camera frame and the lens holder, they are both perpendicular to the ground. See How does a tilt-shift lens work, and why does it solve certain problems?


2

Can any give me a good explanation of how this is supposed to work, or if it can work at all with a 100mm lens? If you're set on using a 100mm lens, you will need to add some more distance between the camera and bellows, using extension tubes. For 1:1 slide copy work, that bellows was intended to be used with a 50mm lens (or similar focal length). ...


2

1:1 (life-size) is achieved when the object is 4 times the focal length from the image plane (film plane or sensor plane). If a 100mm lens is mounted, the lens-to-image-plane distance will be approximately 400mm. The lens position will approximately split this distance i.e. 200mm from object and 200mm from image plane. These are approximate points because ...


1

This is appears to be a breech-lock mount. Breech-lock mounts visually appear to be just about the opposite of bayonet mounts. In typical bayonet mounts, The camera body has slots to receive a cylinder with tabs (from a connector standpoint, it is "female"); The lens has an extended cylinder with multiple locking tabs protruding from the end of the cylinder ...


1

PB-6 has more tolerances for more mounting rings, especially if one has to use old metal converters on medium and large format lenses. PB-4 can also mount those manual converters but for some tight angles may interfere with free movement of the bellows. PB-6 design is more accommodating. That is the response I got when I asked a true expert, an expert who ...


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