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I am not sure about who used the Beauty Dish for photography first, but the principle of evenly illumination via secondary reflection is accredited to danish mathematician Piet Hein, who constructed the R(a) - lamp in 1931 to alleviate the harsh direct light from the electric bulb in reading-situations. source: http://www.futuraoslo.no/index.php?/produkter/...


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To my understanding, a Beauty dish is not really about making the light softer. That's what softboxes / bounce are for. The true value of a beauty dish is that it focuses the beam of light in a 3D point/zone, thus simulating a virtual light at that point. This virtual light has the same property as a real one. Getting this virtual light right in front of ...


2

While not exactly a softlight reflector as in the beauty dish, bounce lighting itself was first used in 1956 by Subrata Mitra, but in cinema. The technique itself was devised to overcome difficulties with exposure that were encountered while filming Aparajito, which is the second amongst the three films of the famous Apu Trilogy by Satyajit Ray. If there ...


2

Your diagram definitely supports your observations. Although not currently using one, and taking your diagram into consideration, having used beauty dishes in the past, this is what I found; (most of which is in agreement to what you are saying.) • Unlike a large softbox, the beauty dish is designed to be used to create shadows. • Depending on how ...


1

Youre not wrong, but think of it like this You have a speedlight a focused point source of light. Next we have a beauty dish (it is a focused bare bulb) so now a light source the diameter of the dish. But like you are thinking. Inside itself parabolic focal distance you have MANY light sources from 360’ directions Next you have a bare bulb, beauty didh ...


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For smaller beauty dishes up to about 12 inches in diameter, I've been known to use a 'cake caddy' once or twice. But I'm not sure if you can easily find them in sizes of 24+ inches.


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I consider that channel a good source of tips. But in this case, they are making a not so good job. Let me explain some flaws and "omissions" on the video. Do you see that big bright hotspot on the center of the umbrella? DAM! if you have a 72-inch umbrella, but you put the flash 10 inches away from it you are wasting it... It is almost the same as if you ...


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That light will be fine for that application. Its always a balance between iris/depth of field/shutter speed/distance to subject. Start at the lowest monolight power for the first shot and work up to mid-range to understand the effect at the subject distance. Adjust ISO or shutter speed, rinse and repeat until the image works for you. If the process is ...


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This question is a little abstract... If your flash heads are heavy you need a sturdy stand. If you are on the outside you could use a sandbag to add weight. If you are using the light just a fill light or lateral, or whatever light you can use any stand. If you are taking specificly butterfly lighting then a boom tripod or C-stand it is usefull, but not ...


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I had one in 1971. Made by Photax as part of its Interfit range of tungsten lighting for photographers. It wasn't called a beauty dish back then though. Might have been called a softlight or similar. Still got the Photax stands and standard reflectors. Accidentally trod on the softtlight so haven't got it anymore.


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