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14

The Nikon FG-20 has an electronic shutter, which will not work properly if no battery is inserted. You can, with limited capabilities, still use the camera without a battery. Light metereing will of course not work, but the shutter speeds are also restricted to B and a mechanically controlled 1/90s indicated as 'M90' on the speed dial. Unfortunately, the ...


10

It depends on the specific camera. The Pentax K1000, for example, only requires the battery for metering, but everything else is mechanical. On your camera, shutter timing is electronic and requires a battery — but according to the manual there is a special setting M90 which provides a 1/90th of a second shutter speed which is all mechanical and can be used ...


7

Not a definitive answer, but I'm a fan of using the USB connection first. My thinking is that if the USB port suffers mechanical failure, you'll still be able to charge and export files externally, but if the battery or card compartment breaks, you're without a functioning camera. To put it another way : Durability [external] = Durability [card slot + ...


7

I've had good luck with Eneloop batteries. One problem with NiMH batteries is that they produce a lower voltage than standard alkalines. NiMH batteries produce ~1.25 volts (vs 1.5 volts for alkys) for most of their life. (may start at ~1.35v freshly charged) Equipment that's not 'NiMH aware' might complain that the batteries are almost dead when they are ...


6

Although freshly charged NiMH measure at 1.4 or so volts, they quickly drop to 1.2 under load. However, unlike alkalines, they stay around that 1.2 for a long time (this is called a "relatively flat discharge curve"). Alkalines by contrast have a much steeper discharge curve but do present a higher terminal voltage when new. (Hint: You can separate unused ...


6

I understand your concern. I personally have bought things on Amazon which looked completely legit but turned out to be fraudulent. (Like, not just generic instead of official, but actually with fake brand silkscreening.) However, this is generally because Amazon isn't really selling most of the stuff on amazon.com — it's a big network of third-party ...


4

If you want them to last months waiting for use, your only problem is in not buying the proper NiMH battery choice. AA NiMH have MUCH more power capacity that alkalines. This may not be significantly noticeable for low drain devices like mp3 players, but it is all important for the high drain in cameras and flashes. That is speaking of any NiMH, however ...


4

The Nikon D5100 uses a rechargeable internal clock battery. It should have enough charge to give you 3 months to charge the main battery. A main battery that is almost completely empty, should also have enough power left to keep the clock running for months or even years. There is probably a problem with your internal battery, or a contact to it. The ...


4

If the film advanced and you heard the shutter fire, there's a good chance you captured something. Based on info mattdm provides, the film may be under or over exposed, depending on whether photos were taken indoors or out, because of the fixed shutter speed. You can try using the camera while examining the shutter to see what happens. Consider taking the ...


4

My experience is with Canon cameras (5D, XXD series). The ports are accessed via a rubber gasket on the side that sits well enough to create a good seal around the ports but is also only held on by the same rubber. It's a rather tight junction - which is good, one doesn't want it flopping around. But, at the same time, leaves me feeling like opening it 100% ...


3

What to do is pretty much up to you and your preferences. If you are careful, either approach can work until you feel it is time to replace the camera for other reasons. Unless a camera can be charged only by USB, I prefer to swap batteries and cards. I have used the battery door and card slots on my cameras nearly every day for years. The greatest risk of ...


3

Warranty service is with Nikon, not Best Buy or any other retailer. If Nikon says you can buy a genuine product someplace, then you can (and you did). If you're concerned a product is not genuine, verify the serial number on the manufacturer website. If you're unable to figure it out, you'll likely have difficulty making a claim because it's usually a ...


3

Most cameras have a capacitor or internal battery that keeps the clock and settings active while the battery is being changed. If the camera is left with a dead battery for a very long time, the capacitor or battery may become fully discharged and dysfunctional.


3

No, it doesn't require batteries, although there are drawbacks to using the camera without them. The battery powers the camera's light meter. This means you will not be able to shoot in auto without a battery. You could shoot manually, but this would mean metering must be done either by guestimating, using the sunny 16 rule, or by the use of an external ...


3

Yes, it is okay to use a larger capacity battery in your camera. The only important value is the 3.7v specification. There is a good chance the 1500mAh battery you want to buy is actually a 1100mAh because sellers and manufacturers often exaggerate the actual capacity.


3

This turned out much longer than I thought it would. Skip to "conclusion" at the end for a tl;dr. I would like to build a custom DIY battery pack that uses a larger battery. This is a good idea! Can I connect the battery directly to the flash? This is not! Sadly, the links are dead and I can barely find any information on the product. What I did ...


3

I use them all of the time in several different hot shoe mount flashes. The only difference I've noticed is that when I put in a set of fresh alkalines, the battery level indicator shows 'full'. When I put in a set of freshly charged NiMH batteries, the indicator does well to show three out of four bars. However, a set of fully charged NiMHs that show three ...


3

You do not have a 1150 mAh (milliamp-hours) charger. There's no such thing. It might be an 1150 mA (milliamp) charger, which means it's only providing 1.15 amps of charging current. Some batteries require a minimum current to charge very well. My Samsung smartphone, for instance, requires a 1500mA charger. If I try to use a 700 mA (0.7A) or 1000 mA (1.0A) ...


2

A 6VDC power supply would actually have to be quite massive (think laptop rather than phone power supply sized), big speedlites can draw several amperes when charging. There are a few older flashes that, as per the documentation, deprecate the use of rechargeables (eg the Metz 45CT); this should not be an issue with more modern ones. The most likely cause ...


2

Nikon has made an effort to stop third-party batteries by integrating a chip into the battery which reports some identifier. It's clearly not very strong cryptographically, as these clone batteries exist and report false information. Now, I'm a very strong believer in your right to use a battery like this — it should be an option. But, lithium batteries can ...


2

Based on discussions threads over the Internet there are two possibilities: a camera firmware disabled access to that brand of battery The chip responsible for communicating with the camera is no longer working Source https://www.dpreview.com/forums/thread/3623903 Unfortunately there is no fix for the first issue. The second issue can be fixed if the ...


2

CMOS battery or supercapacitor charging are likely culprits, as you state. Keep the battery charged to prevent losing date/time and customized settings, as well.


2

The camera battery compartment is separate from the light-tight area of the camera. This being the case, you can remove dead batteries and replace without harming the film. You are advised to check the camera’s manual. When the battery dies or is near death, likely the camera stops functioning. Under these circumstances you will have little choice; you must ...


2

It will probably charge the battery, but likely at a slower rate than Nikon's EH-7P USB-C battery charger. According to a Nikon employee's response to the question titled "USB-C power specifications" at Nikon's product forum for the EH-7P (Nikon doesn't create direct permalinks for questions asked at its product forums), the EH-7P has a maximum rated output ...


2

No need to hack up something yourself, this already exists, google for "DMW-BLH7E BLH7 Dummy Battery DMW-DCC15" (around $20 on Amazon US).


1

You don't need to do this when purchasing a DSLR. When you get the DSLR, it has probably around 40% charge because that's the optimal charge for long-term storage. If that partial 40% charge doesn't annoy you, you can start shooting immediately. Or, you can charge it immediately if you want to. DSLR lithium-ion batteries are unlike car lead-acid batteries, ...


1

If anything, rechargables should be better than alkalines because they can deliver more peak power. But that is a problem too, because they could cause a fire. Cheap toys refuse to accept rechargables because it would be unsafe. How do they know ? The + cap of a rechargable is a bit wider than a regular battery, so with a bit of extra plastic around the + of ...


1

There is usually an internal battery/capacitor that helps maintain small bits of information like date time and location. Most likely this battery is dead and causing you to re-enter the information. The D5100 is not really user serviceable and I wouldn't recommend changing this yourself. You can get yourself a battery grip and get a longer shooting period ...


1

Draining (or calibrating - initialising) the battery without a proper charger is not possible. Like you said, at a certain level, everything shuts down. To drain the battery completely, you have to continue using power. The only thing thats still alive is the top display. If you switch on the light of the top display (by turning the on/off switch one notch ...


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