13

The battery door. This is where the door that is normally on the camera goes while you have the battery grip on the camera. That way, when you remove the grip, you can easily put the door back on without losing it. The manual shows how it works.


10

I never take my battery grip off my 5D mark iii. The extra battery life that it gives is wonderful. That said, I use it with the official batteries and I have a total of 4 regular batteries for it. I do still have a loaded and ready to go AA tray in-case of emergency, but AA's don't really work well as a battery option because they still provide less ...


8

Two batteries in parallel at the same voltage can supply more current than one of them alone can. If we were talking about car or truck engines we would say we have twice as much torque (current) at the same RPM (voltage). Therefore the same load will not cause the same drop in voltage when two of the same batteries are in parallel. This also means a greater ...


4

This is completely dependent on the make/model of the DSLR. Some ONLY use the extra battery power as reserve, while others will register the availability of the extra power and drive the AF motor more vigorously. But this is brand/make/model specific.


4

The entire light box, including the rectangular reflex mirror would need to be rotated as well. You would also either need a second prism/viewfinder to catch the light coming off the rotated mirror or you would need to be able to rotate the prism/viewfinder as well. The same goes for the AF array in the floor of the light box that catches light off the ...


4

It all depends on which Info screen you are talking about and what is currently displayed on the rear LCD when you press the INFO. button. If you are shooting and you press the INFO. button to cycle to the Shooting Functions screen on the rear LCD, the value will be displayed as a combined one, as will the value displayed on the monochrome LCD on the top of ...


4

As per my instruction manual: "Be sure to attach the battery grip to the camera before inserting the batteries. The results of the battery check may not be displayed properly if you attach the battery grip to the camera with the batteries already inside." Also the battery grip power button is specifically for the additional camera controls on the battery ...


4

It's highly doubtful such a grip exists. Nikon did not design the D3200 to accommodate a grip. Nikon doesn't offer a grip for the D3200 and other D3xx0 series cameras. There are no additional contacts in the D3200 battery well to allow communication between controls on a grip and the camera. Most DSLRs that may be used with a manufacturer's battery grip ...


3

I think the short answer is that you'd have to design a new mount specifically to achieve this, or use a smaller sensor than the mount would otherwise support (e.g. ASP-C sensor with an EF-only mount; no EF-S). If you take the lens off a Canon 5D, for example, and look at the mirror/sensor (you can use Bulb mode or the sensor cleaning mode to see it) you'll ...


3

It depends on how the battery grip is made. There are two factors to consider: Can one battery be removed without disconnecting the other? Some grips have a flap type door that opens to reveal both batteries sitting side-by-side and still maintaining a connection. If a grip is this type, can the access door be opened without tripping a shut-down switch? ...


3

You could use an AC Adaptor - The Sony AC-PW20 is the option here. Alternatively you could buy a third party non-OEM battery that is rated above the OEM battery in capacity. The Sony NP-FW50 is rated at 1080 mAh and you can find some 1500 mAh options out there if you look.


3

You can only see the detailed battery status under the Battery Info display in the menu. The LCD on top and Info screens show a combined status (average) for simplicity, though the camera will generally use power from both batteries roughly evenly. The Battery Info screen (found under the third section of the Wrench menu) will display shutter counts for ...


3

Battery grips takes up a huge space like 1.5x bigger camera and adds on weight just the same. If you carry it for a few hours in your hand your arms may hurt. If you're shooting in the streets battery grips are scary just as big zooms are. People will be more shy in front of your camera. So in street photography smaller is better. The only benefit of a ...


2

Battery grips are heavy and take space. I have a nikon D80 with the original battery and a battery grip, and I end up using the original battery much more often.


2

I've got Zeikos grips for both my 5DII and 7D. They work fine. Sometimes I have to wiggle the right hand battery in the one for the 7D to get the camera to see it. Once the battery is seated, the camera sees it, and the door to the battery compartment is closed I've never had it stop being recognized until the battery is removes and reinserted. The build ...


2

AA batteries will hardly replace regular battery. Either you spend lot of money in buying often high capacity so they last longer then cheaper AA or you get rechargeable that will not last so long and need to be charged often. I recently bought battery grip so I do not have to worry about charging when going on long trip. Yes, it does make camera bigger ...


2

If you look on the menu under the "Wrench" Icon, third section, second choice -- "Battery info." Do you see both batteries? If so, all it good. It is my understanding that LCD and info screens only show a total battery power view -- meaning that when both batteries are ~1/2 discharged it should read 1/2.


2

It's funny you should ask because I have just sent a second grip back from my D7000 and ordered a third by Meike. The first two I had were unbranded but I have a suspicion that they're all the same anyway with a different sticker. I certainly can't tell the difference. The problem is that if you have no choice other than to get a third party one you may not ...


2

You would need a view finder that could display the image in portrait orientation. You would need a shutter that can open and close the direction you want. You would need to be able to adjust the AF sensor. There is far more complexity and things to break. It is far, far easier and more reliable to turn the camera. If there was a camera, even at the ...


2

Go into your custom settings menu and assign and scroll down until you see the "Assign MB-D15" button. Change it to "AF-ON" or whatever you want it to be.


2

The way every grip I've ever used has worked is that whatever particular button on the grip corresponds to a particular button on the camera will function the same way as that button on the camera body without any additional setup. Just as pressing the shutter release on the grip does the exact same thing as pressing the shutter button on the camera, if the ...


2

You can only buy two battery camera groups for the Canon 6D. Have a look at the Canon BG-E13. This let's you use two batteries which effectively doubles the battery life of your camera. You can also buy a mains adapter for the 6D which substitutes the battery. If you want to try a DIY option you could combine the Battery adapter part of the 6D mains ...


2

Modern cameras don't use simple electric motors. Their power is not directly proportional to the voltage provided, it stays the same whatever voltage applied. Reading several sources I can deduce that most cameras do not get a faster shutter speed from the use of the grip. The exception that I found are Nikon cameras which are reported to indeed improve the ...


2

It might sound silly to you, but my two main reasons for using a grip are these: 1) Better balance and inertia when using big lenses 2) My pinky finger no longer slips off the bottom of the camera


2

One possible reason is that the NEX-F2's card slot is under the bottom, so a grip would have to either: leave space for card access (and so would not have much space for batteries) completely lock up the card access. So a hard to design thing for a rather limited market... Further research points to some OwnUser taiwanese company that made grips for the ...


1

yes the camera will not turn on without the battery cover in place. However, the battery cover is fully detachable and has to be removed completely for the battery grip to be fitted. It is also likely to be a very cheap replacement part. Before you go looking for a replacement one though, take a look on the battery grip itself. See in this picture: The ...


1

From the description you've supplied it looks like your battery has failed and needs replacing. The easiest way to test it is to find someone who has another d5100 near you and try your battery in their charger / camera. The d5100 is a very popular body and it is likely that someone you know has one (or another camera that uses the same battery.) Li-ion ...


1

They make the MB-D15 http://www.amazon.com/Nikon-MB-D15-Battery-Pack-Digital/dp/B00BJ3NGFS I have one of these and love it. The challenge/benefit with third party ones are: Challenges: Can be lower quality. Check out reviews. Generally people like Photix grip. Benefits: Lower cost.


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