6

You have to use a flash, or some other powerful light to light the people in front of the window. If there are many and big windows in the building, you may also use a reflector to guide light towards the people. But, you have to be careful not to direct the light so you get a reflection in the window. This can be done with just some minor movements form ...


5

No, it is not normal. These stripes look a lot like Newton's Rings, even though they aren't rings. Did you use some filter in front of the lens, which might have created those patterns?


4

All you need to do is time the shot correctly. The closer to sunset you shoot the lower the intensity of the sunlight compared to the light from the open sky. You can see in the image you posted you can see the position of the sun that is very low to the horizon. This was shot just before sunset with no reflectors or other light sources: http://www....


4

The trick here has nothing to do with metering, and everything to do with timing and atmospheric conditions. You want to shoot late in the day when the sun is very low in the sky, preferably when there is lots of haze. This gives you a good diffuse light from the hazy area to lift the shadows and a manageable amount of rim lighting from the sun itself. If ...


3

Chris's suggestion of an off-camera flash is a good one. Another option could be to "cheat" by taking two shots — one with the exposure adjusted for the outside background and one with a longer exposure for the people in the foreground — and combine them using exposure blending. In fact, you may well want to do both: use a flash (or just static ...


3

There are a number of Apps available for this Photo.net has an article with a listing of apps The ones that appear to be what you're after are http://www.lighttracapp.com/ or possibly http://photoephemeris.com/ Lighttracapp is a simpler option to do what you're after so I'd start there. Photoephemeris has some more robust features but is also more ...


3

I think in these situations is best to underexpose and take advantadge of post-processing to bring back the shadows. One other think you might consider is that Elena has used flash (with gels) to compensate. I allways think a good use of flash is when you don't notice right away and, these might be good examples. Take a look at the tree, it's perfectly lit ...


2

Elena has exposed lower than what you may have, at least as it appears in the bottom third, in the grass and such. I would tend to want to underexpose as well so I can capture the light around the birch leaves. Post treatment might include a gradient for exposure leaving the bottom untouched but reducing exposure in the sky and sun.


2

Blow the background, and pull down highlights in LR afterwards. Normally you'd want to add a reflector to reflect the back light back on the subject, or use a fill a flash. Without those, you should just blow the background and save it later, if possible, but its probably not important if you can, compared to exposing the subjects decently. Here's an ...


2

This is simply how Nikon has decided to present things. Frankly, I find it odd and is something I mentioned in my reviews of these cameras. The reasoning I guess is that HDR is a solution to shooting a backlit subject. That way, you go to backlight mode and either use the normal part which uses the flash to fill-in the foreground or use the HDR part which ...


2

Yes, Hasin is correct. Bracket the shots and then apply photorealistic HDR techniques. Here's my final shot: This was three exposures of 0.4, 0.1 and 1.6 seconds at f4.0, ISO 100. If you bump your ISO you can use much shorter exposures. I don't like doing that since it introduces noise which HDR can really magnify. Of course I used a tripod. (The lens was ...


2

You can also throw back some light with an off camera flash (left of camera) using a warm gel (to match the color temp with ambient light). If you use E-TTL (or whatever Nikon calls the equivalent), you can simply back off of exposure compensation, and then push your flash compensation up.


2

Use "auto exposure lock" - which is the button marked "AE-L" on the back of your camera - whenever your subject starts to move somewhere that could cause a change in exposure. This video explains how to use exposure locking on the D7000 - Nikon D7000 Tutorial: Using the exposure lock setting.


2

Spyder's software is probably going to suck horribly, you should be using Dispcal GUI. It's going to be sRGB (normal gamut) -- see post 5, here: http://www.notebookcheck.net/Review-Apple-MacBook-Pro-15-Retina-2-3-GHz-Mid-2012.78959.0.html Backlight is LED, third post here: https://www.ifixit.com/Answers/View/190272/No+backlight+after+LCD+replacement .. I ...


1

Based on your comment: your image is super-underexposed. From the metadata: Exposure time: 1/125s Aperture: f/5.0 ISO: 1600 and it looks like, from the link you gave, that you've pushed this up about three stops in post processing. (That is, to the equivalent of ISO 12,800.) It is not at all unexpected to see artifacts like banding when taking an ...


1

I didn't mess around in color since i don't have the raw file and the jpeg correction would look pretty bad. But in the newest version of lightroom you have access to the dehaze tool. I also messed around a bit with the contrast and clarity. You may have to take them to a professional if you don't know what you are doing.


1

Maybe try the free "sunshine compass" Android app, it simply activates the phone camera showing the camera feed overlayed with a curve of the sun's path, annotated with time points, using GPS, so you can point your phone in different directions and visually determine the where and when of the sun's location.


1

Some of the pictures look like there are reflectors, or very nicely balanced light or strobes to fill in the shadow details. I especially noticed the spect. highlights in the bunny eye. I have never seen her before...I may have to worship her. ;)


1

What you are looking for is called "shallow depth of field" (that is, just little bit in focus and the rest blurred). There are 3 factors that effect depth of field, with a small point and shoot camera you have to combine all of them if you want to get a visible effect (actually there are 4, but you can't change the 4th): Focal length - zoom in as much as ...


1

Briefly, you can get that effect using a large aperture. A large aperture gives you shallow depth of field, so the subject will be sharply focussed while the background is blurred. On the Nikon Coolpix 8800, set the camera mode to 'A' (for aperture priority) and then adjust the aperture to a low value (low values mean large aperture, high values mean small ...


1

I think if you take bracketed shots and merge them using Exposure Fusion technique, it may work. here is a link: How does exposure fusion work?


1

If you don't want flash reflections in the window, and you don't plan to use off-camera flash with umbrellas etc, I suggest to turn the strobe's head so that it points at a wall (nearby) or the ceiling. I think the bounce will give you plenty of light, and diffuse its direction at the same time. You'll probably want to set the strobe to maximum power, to get ...


1

If you don't want to use the flash because of reflections you will need to adjust how your camera is metering the scene. You need to use spot metering on your subject so you camera will expose you subject properly.


1

I'd suggest popping-up your built-in flash (if you don't have an external one) and using a diffuser on it (or making one). If you have a reflection in the window, you could position yourself so that the model is between your flash and the windows, so the model would prevent the flash from hitting the windows directly. You could also position yourself just ...


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