19

Definitely you shall use frontal lighting. Mostly so called fill-in flash. The second option: HDR with at least 3 shots to get high, mid and low tones.


17

This is the situation when you use fill-flash. Contrary to common belief, flash is NOT to be used in darkness. In darkness flash lights up the foreground and leaves background pitch black. Flash is best used to outshine bright light you can't control (like sun) so you can bring dark foreground up to bright background. This will most likely create white ...


16

Ruined? That's a great photo! (If you were going for a sort of Halloween effect.) The position of the key light – off to the side and elevated – was perfect for this subject, and is typical of how beauty dishes are used. Now, if you didn't want the shadow here are things to consider: Using a single source you can't have the subject against a ...


15

This is motion blur caused by 'panning'. Ideally, you would use a tripod or monopod and track the car (panning) as it's moving with a relatively slow shutter speed. The background will blur as you move the camera, but the car will stay in focus as it's relative position with the camera hasn't changed. The slower your shutter speed the harder it will be to ...


14

Graphic Design Stack Exchange: How to cut how hair accurately Advanced hair extraction tutorial First off, plugins and simpler methods are available. This is if you want to get higher quality results. I'll be using this photo from Photo by Ariana Prestes on Unsplash.com: Note: I'm going to be doing the body in a separate layer so I'll be ignoring it for ...


12

The color replacement tool isn't working for you because its default mode is "Color", which changes hue and saturation, but not luminosity (brightness/value). That's why you get the blue or the gray→gray effect. Changing this the tool's mode to Luminosity may get you what you want. I don't have Photoshop, so I'm not the best-suited to answer that. For an ...


11

Despite the name of your modifier (Profoto White Softlight 20.5" Reflector), this is no soft light at all. The light source is far away and small enough to produce hard light on the subject. The most common property that makes light hard or soft is how smooth the shadows are. This can be seen from the shadow under the chin on the neck. The shadow has a sharp ...


10

Well, you need lighting gear, so this is a LOT easier to do if you can buy lighting gear like flashes, stands, and radio triggers. The way a white background is achieved in studio photography is by creating lighting zones. The subject is in one zone, and the background is in another, and each of these zones has a different level of light. When the ...


10

The difference between the outside parts of the scene and the inside parts of the scene are too great for your camera (or pretty much any camera) to properly record both. You have two basic options: Add more light to the indoor parts of the scene. The best results will be with strategically placed off camera light sources that won't cause distracting ...


9

It can be hard to pick up, but the shadows on the wall behind the backdrop in a couple of shots should be telling you that there is a light immediately behind the subject. There is one picture with the subject over a large puddle or pool of water, and that one's the giveaway: if you look at the reflection, you can see that there is a small light stand in ...


9

Other answers have already covered that the difference between the light exterior & dark interior is too great for almost any camera sensor. With no additional equipment, and if you had the time, waiting until the light faded outdoors would have been your optimum solution - though could get somewhat tedious, if that was lunchtime ;) Exposure to the ...


8

If as you say the background has been setup before the shoot then best practice would be to shoot in manual mode and take a few test exposures to confirm your settings. Using the camera histogram is far more accurate than any of the metering modes.


8

I recently upgraded to a used Nikon D80 with DX AF-S Nikkor 18-55mm lens and I am still learning how to use it. I have really only used it on Auto Mode. Unfortunately, I cannot purchase any more equipment right now or any time soon. I am supposed to do an indoor maternity shoot in 2 days for a family member and I am really nervous. Oh. Dear. Here's the ...


8

The simplest way get a gradient background is to use a gradient backdrop. This particular backdrop is made of paper, and is 80cm × 110cm (31" × 43"). Another backdrop at B&H Photo Video is PVC, 43" × 67" (110cm × 170cm). And yet another one at B&H is muslin, and is 5' × 7' if you need a very large product backdrop. Try searching Google, B&H ...


8

Given your gear, a perfectly balanced inside and outside will be impossible - the correct exposures for each are too far apart. Since shadows can be bumped up and blown highlights are completely gone, you should err on the side of not blowing anything out. You actually handled the situation as best you could. In looking at the first shot, nothing appears ...


7

As a rule of thumb if you can do it in-camera then you should. If nothing else, getting that kind of mask right in post processing can be time consuming and fiddly. It all adds time to your workflow that you don't really need to spend. Do it with a backdrop and a coloured sheet - it'll be slightly more difficult to set up initially but once it's done once ...


7

This technique is called “panning”. Panning produces the effect you are asking about however panning also allows the photographer to freeze action using a lowered shutter speed. Panning the camera is often employed when imaging airplanes, cars and running athletes. The photographer composes the fast moving subject and swipes the camera, keeping pace with ...


7

"Blown out" means the maximum value for all color channels. For RGB, that means maximum red, maximum blue, and maximum green. This appears to be pure white, even if the color of the subject is not white or a shade of gray. If you take a baby blue wall and expose it properly, in the resulting image the wall will be baby blue. If you over expose it enough, ...


6

You need more light on the background than on the subject. If all four of your lights are the same brightness, then you need to do two things: Insure that the lights illuminating the background are as close to the background as you can place them without being visible in the scene or creating uneven brightness on the background. Also insure that none of the ...


6

More exposure makes black look gray, and Less exposure makes gray look more black. But in practice, for your coins on a jet black background, your best investment would be a yard of black dress velvet from the fabric store. It will photograph extremely black (whereas any black paper will reflect more light).


6

One thing that hasn't been mentioned is that you need to achieve the highest separation between foreground and background lighting, so if you can find a way to lift the coin above the surface, you can increase the light on the coin and get a relatively darker background. Complete the job with exposure compensation and post processing.


6

Shoot in RAW at the lowest ISO. Expose for the sunlit portion of the picture. In your RAW software adjust the shadows to show some details. The bench is lit by direct sun and the shaded areas are lit by the blue sky. This will give different white balances. In your RAW processor you can produce two different pictures with the two different white balances. ...


6

You are now experiencing the power of nature and the construction of human eye :-). Technically the CMOS sensors are catching like 6-7 EV brightnes/darkness span (dynamic range) at one time (for the 14-bit sensors/raw images). Info taken from Bryan Peterson's book Understanding Exposure. Everything that is beyond that will be black or white. Human eye ...


6

I really like several of the other answers here — particularly, use of fill-flash to balance the scene as the top technical measure, and accept the camera as an important alternate way of thinking. I want to add to that second one just a little bit. I think this photograph succeeds as a composition just as it is in terms of exposure, but the mixed white ...


6

You have flare. That's the light wrapping around the edges of her body, particularly pronounced in her left (camera right) armpit and hand. The background is spilling too much light onto her. Light the background completely separately from your subject. You want to get your subject farther from the background and light it with a more directional light and/...


6

Try shooting a bracketed set of photos, then fusing them together. Here is one example I tried as an experiment. The bracketed photos, with the largest center one being the default exposure: And the result after postprocessing: This isn't a perfect solution, for example if the subject is close and there is movement you get completely different results (...


5

Actually, printer paper is not true white. It's produced to fool our eyes in thinking it is, which sounds weird I know but it is. You are probably getting more transmitted light/reflection from the printer paper as it at has a small amount of gloss on it. Photographic background paper is completely matte so it will give you a slight exposure change vs ...


5

My short answer is just move the model a little further from the background. The rest are just some additional opinions. An additional thing is subjective, because it is modifying the light style: It is moving the light source a bit to your right. In my opinion the light is a little "plain" because it feels too close to the camera. If you move your light ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible