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19

Definitely you shall use frontal lighting. Mostly so called fill-in flash. The second option: HDR with at least 3 shots to get high, mid and low tones.


17

There are many improvements that could be made here. Firstly, you need to use a much longer exposure, and a lower ISO setting. Get a tripod, even a cheap one, and use mirror lockup. Could do with stopping down a bit further for depth of field. Post processing You might be able to get away with your current shots, with some post processing. Here I've taken ...


17

This is the situation when you use fill-flash. Contrary to common belief, flash is NOT to be used in darkness. In darkness flash lights up the foreground and leaves background pitch black. Flash is best used to outshine bright light you can't control (like sun) so you can bring dark foreground up to bright background. This will most likely create white ...


16

Ruined? That's a great photo! (If you were going for a sort of Halloween effect.) The position of the key light – off to the side and elevated – was perfect for this subject, and is typical of how beauty dishes are used. Now, if you didn't want the shadow here are things to consider: Using a single source you can't have the subject against a ...


15

What you encountered is the dynamic-range limit of your camera. All cameras and films have a limit to the dynamic-range they capture and scenes where the contrast is too high will always cause exactly this kind of problem. For cases with moving subjects, like a wedding, they are two avenues to diminish the issue: Reframe so that your subject is surrounded ...


15

This is motion blur caused by 'panning'. Ideally, you would use a tripod or monopod and track the car (panning) as it's moving with a relatively slow shutter speed. The background will blur as you move the camera, but the car will stay in focus as it's relative position with the camera hasn't changed. The slower your shutter speed the harder it will be to ...


14

The white background effect is usually done by lighting the background and the subject separately, you can't do this with such a small box. There are no camera settings that will help you because your problem is that the difference in brightness between the background and subject is too small - and everything that makes the picture darker or brighter ...


14

Graphic Design Stack Exchange: How to cut how hair accurately Advanced hair extraction tutorial First off, plugins and simpler methods are available. This is if you want to get higher quality results. I'll be using this photo from Photo by Ariana Prestes on Unsplash.com: Note: I'm going to be doing the body in a separate layer so I'll be ignoring it for ...


13

To make the inverse square law work for you, you need to get the light as close to the subject as possible, and move the subject away from the background as much as possible. It will also help if you can "flag" the light so it doesn't strike the background, at least not in the angle of view of the camera.


12

The color replacement tool isn't working for you because its default mode is "Color", which changes hue and saturation, but not luminosity (brightness/value). That's why you get the blue or the gray→gray effect. Changing this the tool's mode to Luminosity may get you what you want. I don't have Photoshop, so I'm not the best-suited to answer that. For an ...


11

Despite the name of your modifier (Profoto White Softlight 20.5" Reflector), this is no soft light at all. The light source is far away and small enough to produce hard light on the subject. The most common property that makes light hard or soft is how smooth the shadows are. This can be seen from the shadow under the chin on the neck. The shadow has a sharp ...


10

Well, you need lighting gear, so this is a LOT easier to do if you can buy lighting gear like flashes, stands, and radio triggers. The way a white background is achieved in studio photography is by creating lighting zones. The subject is in one zone, and the background is in another, and each of these zones has a different level of light. When the ...


10

The difference between the outside parts of the scene and the inside parts of the scene are too great for your camera (or pretty much any camera) to properly record both. You have two basic options: Add more light to the indoor parts of the scene. The best results will be with strategically placed off camera light sources that won't cause distracting ...


9

You have several opportunities to improve your results! The first thing I would do is increase the light enough to get the ISO down to native sensitivity for your camera. Probably ISO 100 or 200. You can get the same depth of field (DoF) by increasing the focal length and the focus distance by the same proportion. This will improve the perspective and your ...


9

It can be hard to pick up, but the shadows on the wall behind the backdrop in a couple of shots should be telling you that there is a light immediately behind the subject. There is one picture with the subject over a large puddle or pool of water, and that one's the giveaway: if you look at the reflection, you can see that there is a small light stand in ...


9

Other answers have already covered that the difference between the light exterior & dark interior is too great for almost any camera sensor. With no additional equipment, and if you had the time, waiting until the light faded outdoors would have been your optimum solution - though could get somewhat tedious, if that was lunchtime ;) Exposure to the ...


8

I've done a lot of this work in the past and tried enough different methods to be sure that there is no quick way to do it that gives good results. You can have either quick or good, but not both together. I'd love to be proven wrong on this as I imagine I'll have to do a lot more of this work in future. Here are the three main methods I use: Manually cut ...


8

If you want to take a portrait like this without blacking out the background in Photoshop, then there are a couple things to keep in mind. The big idea is that you need to make minimize the amount of light that hits your background. You mentioned the inverse square law, and the distance between the subject and the background helps. But the camera settings ...


8

The building did not become darker in the second picture, the colors are different but the brightness is about the same. There are two differences between the photos: White balance. The building is lit with somewhat yellow lights, in the 1st picture the camera compensates and makes the light white. For the second picture the flash's light is blue, the ...


8

If as you say the background has been setup before the shoot then best practice would be to shoot in manual mode and take a few test exposures to confirm your settings. Using the camera histogram is far more accurate than any of the metering modes.


8

I recently upgraded to a used Nikon D80 with DX AF-S Nikkor 18-55mm lens and I am still learning how to use it. I have really only used it on Auto Mode. Unfortunately, I cannot purchase any more equipment right now or any time soon. I am supposed to do an indoor maternity shoot in 2 days for a family member and I am really nervous. Oh. Dear. Here's ...


8

The simplest way get a gradient background is to use a gradient backdrop. This particular backdrop is made of paper, and is 80cm × 110cm (31" × 43"). Another backdrop at B&H Photo Video is PVC, 43" × 67" (110cm × 170cm). And yet another one at B&H is muslin, and is 5' × 7' if you need a very large product backdrop. Try searching Google, B&H ...


8

Given your gear, a perfectly balanced inside and outside will be impossible - the correct exposures for each are too far apart. Since shadows can be bumped up and blown highlights are completely gone, you should err on the side of not blowing anything out. You actually handled the situation as best you could. In looking at the first shot, nothing appears ...


7

I have two suggestions: The first, and easiest suggestions is to use fill flash. Flash isn't just for outdoor photos and can work very well to bring out some detail, particularly if the background is brighter than the subject. As Itai mentioned though, flash can lead to some unnatural results, so it's not always the best option, particularly if you don't ...


7

Set your Nikon D7000 to auto focus using AF-S and select one of the 9 cross-type focus points as the only active point. Set your aperture to the widest (lowest number) your lens will allow. Place the point you have selected over the part of the scene you want to selectively focus. Half-press the shutter button to lock focus on your subject and continue to ...


7

As a rule of thumb if you can do it in-camera then you should. If nothing else, getting that kind of mask right in post processing can be time consuming and fiddly. It all adds time to your workflow that you don't really need to spend. Do it with a backdrop and a coloured sheet - it'll be slightly more difficult to set up initially but once it's done once ...


7

This technique is called “panning”. Panning produces the effect you are asking about however panning also allows the photographer to freeze action using a lowered shutter speed. Panning the camera is often employed when imaging airplanes, cars and running athletes. The photographer composes the fast moving subject and swipes the camera, keeping pace with ...


6

Using the inverse square law is only part of the solution. If your background is white, for example, you'll likely find that it's still not quite pitch black. Using a dark background helps (such as a black bed sheet), but the real key is to get some black velvet (check local fabric/crafts stores) which does a great job of absorbing light and making things ...


6

Perspective and settings - like Darkcat Studio said. Direction of the light - in the second background, the side of the tree branches facing the camera near the couple are in shadow while the couple is lit from the front - you have to choose a background that has the same light direction has the foreground picture. Quality of the light - hard light vs. soft ...


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