11

These cameras have microadjustment capability, just not in a user-accessible way. The exact method varies by model. Some have a software feature in an advanced (and secret) "debug" menu — the Pentax K10D, for example, had this. Others have physical adjustment screws or similar (like earlier Canon Rebel models). Or, repair centers may simply use shims. To ...


10

It is not necessarily true that all tele zooms back focus on the wide end. What is almost universal is that no zoom will be exactly calibrated at both the short and long end at the same adjustment setting. Both Canon and Nikon recommend calibrating zoom lenses at the focal length you use the most. If the camera doesn't allow separate entries for the W and T ...


9

No, cameras do not exhibit back-focusing issues. Lenses do not either. What exhibits back focusing issues is a particular camera and lens combination. This can happen with any camera that uses Phase-Detect Autofocus which includes all current DSLRs and some SLDs, notably those from Canon, Nikon and most from Sony. High-end cameras like the D7000 have ways ...


3

If the lens can focus on closer objects, but not achieve infinity focus, the lens needs to be brought closer to the sensor or film plane. This often happens with adapted lenses that move the lens too far from the imaging plane. This also happens when you insert focusing bellows or extension tubes between a camera and its lens — you trade infinity focus for ...


3

There are several possibilities of what is going on here. Before we get too far into the hardware related issues, let's makes sure it's not user error. Modern AF systems, even on cameras such as the 1200D, are fairly sophisticated and there can be a steep learning curve to using them. For more, please see: Do the issues with sharpness I am seeing require AF ...


3

AF alignment is not a camera flaw or a lens flaw — it's a matter of how the two you have work together. Your new 50mm may be perfect out of the box for someone else's camera — and their camera wrong for all of the rest of your lenses. Since your camera does not have a user-accessible focus adjust feature I suggest sending the camera and lens to Canon for ...


3

As Nikon D5X00 cameras lack the micro-focus adjustment feature found in D7X00 cameras, viewfinder front focus and back focus problems cannot be fixed by camera settings. Fortunately, there is an undocumented mechanical adjustment screw inside the mirror box in D5X00 cameras that can be used to correct this problem. This screw has a 2mm hex socket and is ...


3

It can be any number of different things. It all comes down to the tolerences that consumer cameras are built to. Typical suspects would include: Lens Element locations Flange-to-film distance Sensor location Focus sensor It is all about the location of the focal plane as outlined here: What is back-focusing?


3

Your Nikon D7000 is capable of AF Fine Tune. For how to determine if your problem is AF Fine Tune related see Do the issues with sharpness I am seeing require AF fine-tuning? For how to adjust AF Fine Tune, see the following: What is the best way to micro-adjust a camera body to a particular lens? Which offers better results: FoCal or LensAlign Pro? Beyond ...


2

They will most likely just adjust the lens, but use the camera body to judge how much to the lens needs adjusting. As a result your other lenses ought to carry on working fine. In terms of what they can actually do to calibrate the lens, then it will vary depending on the lens but in most cases there will be a position sensor in the lens which detects where ...


2

I've used the Canon equivalent, called Auto Focus Micro Adjustment, for several years. If the Nikon Auto Focus Fine Tuning is anything like Canon's version you have two choices when performing AF Fine Tune: calibrate for a specific lens or calibrate for all lenses. If all of your lenses require a calibration in the same direction then you should adjust the ...


2

Of course I can only speak for the camera I own, and not for the entire produced batch, but yes I had some really nasty back focusing. Taking the time to go into AF fine tuning however, I was able to get things working properly. Can be a tedious job with some lenses, but the camera provides the tools to do it, so wth:-)


2

I'm lazy, so for me, "best" means easiest. YMMV. :) I use Magic Lantern, with the dot_tune.mo module to perform auto dot tune. Dot tune was developed by horshak on dpreview. You don't have to take any pictures with it, it's fast, free, and uses the data of when the AF confirmation dot lights or (or doesn't), with a lens set to critical focus manually, while ...


2

Front or back focus issues can be the result of any of several issues. It's usually a combination of more than one of them since there's no such thing as a perfectly aligned lens, mounting flange, and focus system. The focus elements in the lens not moving exactly as the camera instructed is only one such cause. That particular issue most often results in ...


2

The camera body is only half the equation - the lens is the other half! The optical elements located in the lens must be properly aligned so that there is the correct distance between them and the sensor in the camera body. The only physical thing with the body that can require focus correction is a slightly different distance from the lens mounting flange ...


2

What you are describing is known as back-focusing. The different tolerances in manufacturing, assembling, and calibration have combined such that your individual camera, when combined with your individual lens, will consistently autofocus slightly behind the subject. See also: What is back-focusing? This is correctable by calibration. There are several DSLR ...


2

While it might be an autofocus issue, I'd recommend you make sure it's not the fact that you're shooting at f/1.8 with the lens all the time. :) It is extremely common, after getting their first fast lens, for a newcomer to primes to shoot with it wide open all the time. But that's where the lens is weakest. Unfortunately, in the case of the EF 50mm f/1.8 ...


2

Yes, you can, as long as the given range (-20 to 20) is enough to give you good results. AF Fine tune values are simple to understand. If your camera exhibits back focus (i.e. focus is farther away than you want it to be), you apply a negative value and vice versa - if it exhibits front focus, you apply a positive value. You can find the AF Fine Tune ...


1

What could explain that the problem is so persistent outside, but so rare at home? You're shooting different distances. It's not uncommon at all for lenses and cameras to be properly matched to autofocus accurately at one distance and not autofocus accurately at a significantly different distance. It's why Nikon offers 'Autofocus Fine Tune' and Canon offers ...


1

If you are only testing for relative sharpness and focus accuracy then you don't really need a chart at all. You only need a target/subject of good contrast with fine enough details to judge sharp/unsharp. And something with consistent/repeating details that transitions near-far for judging front/back focus (i.e. a ruler placed at ~45* adjacent to your ...


1

For so-called unit focusing lenses (many but not all prime lenses are), moving it closer to the sensor is what will make it focus to infinity, and that is what the lens mechanics are actually DOING to focus. Lens designs that focus only by moving the front element or group closer to the rest of the lens can usually (if these are simple designs like tessars) ...


1

There are several thing to consider here: Based on reading a lot of reviews from a lot of different sources one can learn that the Sigma Art series of prime lenses are very sharp when focused manually but tend to not do very well on Canon cameras in terms of autofocus. I probably wouldn't consider such a lens unless my intended usage was primarily as a ...


1

The Pluto trigger sends the "Focus" command as a shutter button half press command, rather than a command to "Focus." This is because the connection of the receiver to the camera is via the camera's wired remote port. That's also what wired remote release cables do. The commands sent by the remote are actually commands for "Shutter button half press" and "...


1

The ratio of the amount of Depth of Field (DoF) in front of the focus distance to the amount of DoF behind the point of focus is highly variable. At Minimum Focus Distance (MFD) most lenses give a DoF that very closely approaches 1:1 or 50/50. At any focus distance past the hyperfocal distance the DoF ratio is 1:∞. The common 1:2 or 33/67 rule of thumb is ...


1

When doing AF Fine Tune (Nikon) or AF Micro Adjustment (Canon), the test distance should be as close to possible as the distance you plan to shoot in "real world applications". At the very least, you should probably use a distance that is 25x the focal length of the lens. 50x is even better when possible (very long lenses make this problematic in a ...


1

If you're asking so you can do it yourself, sorry but you're out of luck. The following only applies to DSLR cameras. When adjusting lenses, collimators are used and can cost tens of thousands of dollars. They are finely tuned instruments. A collimator optically emulates infinity (over 100 meters or so) and come in different sizes. It shines light through ...


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