25

The blur is caused by the people moving while you were taking the photograph with a slow shutter. Honestly, I think it improves this particular photo a lot: it shows that the people are dancing, rather than just standing in weird positions. If you want to, the only way to avoid it is to use a faster shutter speed. This necessarily involves compromises. If ...


14

Honestly, the biggest problem I see in your picture is not the blur, but the badly clipped highlights. Next time, try shooting at, say, -1 EV (which will also reduce the exposure time, and thus the blur, a bit) and adjusting the exposure afterwards to get softer highlights. This does increase noise in the shadows a bit, as if you were using a higher ISO ...


8

By a zoom lens I assume you mean a telephoto (long focal length) lens, as zoom implies a variable focal length. There are no f/1.4 zooms and f/2.0 zooms are incredibly rare. In any case you are being mislead by the blurred background into thinking this was shot with a fast f/1.4 - f/2.0 lens. Background blur is actually more closely related to the size of ...


5

You appear to have a Nikon camera. On all other brands, one chooses from a list of ISO sensitivities or Auto. The camera then uses the specified ISO for every option other than Auto. With Nikon, if you have Automatic Sensitivity Control enabled in the Shooting menu, then the camera will use selected ISO as the default and actually select another sensitivity,...


5

In A,S,P,M modes, you have to turn Auto ISO on, in Setup menu, see manual. Auto ISO is automatically ON in Auto mode, but is not automatically ON in A,S,P,M modes, not unless you turn it On. User has choices unless in Auto mode. In A,S,P,M modes, you manually open the popup flash if you want to use it, and don't if you don't. You set Auto ISO On if you ...


5

I don't want to use flash Why not ? It's what flash is for. Get a good external flash and learn to love it. Learn to bounce light from the ceiling or using a bounce card or similar. Easy technique, great results. I would, however, agree that blur is useful in these shots sometimes. There's no other way to give a sense of motion. I disagree with the ...


4

No. Extension tubes that offer AF capability simply mean they have contacts that allow for electronic communication between the body and the lens. They do not have autofocus motors in them or add autofocus capability to a body/lens combination that doesn't have it without the extension tubes.


4

Unless it had been included in a recent firmware update for the EOS 5D Mark III, the only Canon model (as of June, 2014) capable of applying Exposure Compensation to Auto ISO in M exposure mode is the EOS 1D X. That capability was not included in the original firmware but was added by a relatively recent update. Since this answer was written, several new ...


4

1) Yes & No. See pages 47-50 of your D3200 User Manual. You can select Fill flash, Red-eye reduction, Slow sync + red-eye, Slow sync, and Rear-curtain + slow sync while in A mode. All of these modes can automatically calculate the amount of flash power used to correctly expose the shot. The Auto (auto flash) mode that will determine if you need flash and ...


4

Hoping I haven't misunderstood your question, it is as simple as this: Turn Dial on top left of Camera to “M” Press the “Q” button on the back of the camera Set ISO to auto Alternatively Turn Dial on top left of Camera to "M" Press the ISO Button on top of Camera and turn the top dial to the left until you reach "A" now you are free to set the aperture ...


4

The thing you see is called motion blur. The amount of it depends on: subjects move (eg. standing still or waving hands), camera move (how still you're holding a camera) and a setting called Shutter Speed. I'd recommend you to learn how to use the last one. What it is: Imagine a real shutters on a window. You open them, let some light in and then close ...


3

This is the number #1 reason I never leave auto mode. It's too much hassle being forced to set the ISO sensitivity manually. It looks like most people actually prefer this. But if you don't, you can change the setting: According to this article, you enable auto ISO like so: Go to: Menu>Shooting>ISO Sensitivity Settings, and turn the Auto ISO sensitivity ...


3

It's practically impossible to tell, but as I am procrastinating I will take a shot (ho ho): Guesstimate analysis: Telephoto of a minimum 200mm - reason: It's a kite surfer. There are ways of getting this close without a tele, but they aren't exactly simple, and would mean you'd have to be very good indeed at accurate panning - imagine how fast she's going ...


3

To reduce the motion blur, you need to increase your shutter speed. To do that, you need to either increase the aperture or ISO or both until a shutter speed is obtained that can minimise the blur. If the maximum F-Stop for your current lens is f/5.6 and the maximum ISO of your camera is 5000 giving you a shutter speed of 1/8 second which then results in a ...


2

Most Canon DSLRs do not allow Exposure Compensation in Manual Exposure Mode. This is the case with your T2i/550D. There are several things you can try to accomplish what you want to do. When Auto ISO is turned on it uses information from the camera's light meter to make the decision on what ISO to use. Depending on the scene, using different metering modes ...


2

Exposure compensation in manual mode with Auto ISO is not possible with the 5d3, or for that matter, any other Canon camera except the 1DX (according to http://photo.net/canon-eos-digital-camera-forum/00bWQo ). This is called a "known annoyance" of Canon cameras there, I guess I would agree. However, you could go the route of the Magic Lantern firmware ...


2

Exposure compensation basically effects the metering. Because the camera meters to 18% gray, exposure compensation is there to allow you to adjust the parameters used to meter to account for bright subjects or dark subjects, basically by allowing you to indicate that the scene is lighter or darker than the camera thinks. So, in that aspect, this would ...


2

Not repeating the very good answers above: At f/5.6 its difficult to take photographs even in sunlight. You have a newer camera so it works much better at higher iso that cameras even a few years ago did. I found the following very rough rule of thumb when taking sports photos of my sons soccer games: If someone is moving their legs or arms very fast, ...


2

Yes, it is now possible to use Exposure Compensation in Manual mode with Auto ISO with some of Canon’s newer cameras: EOS-1D X EOS-1DX Mark II EOS 5DS / EOS 5DS R EOS 7D Mark II EOS 80D The easiest way is to assign a Custom Function to the “Set” button. Brian Worley: Manual mode, auto ISO and exposure compensation


1

The D7200 manual says that in A or P modes, the ISO menu Minimum Shutter Speed is the threshold concerning if ISO increases or not. It does also say that in Auto Mode that the camera will choose Minimum Shutter Speed based on focal length, but that is only Auto mode. But also, page 104 of the free larger D7200 Reference Manual also says that if flash is ...


1

The camera is behaving this way because the built in flash is relatively weak compared to most external flashes. Even if you are shooting at closer distances, where the built in flash does have enough power to use a lower ISO setting, the camera is apparently applying the same set of rules as if the distance to subject where longer. When using an external ...


1

Use a hot shoe flash. The D7200 is one of the later models with the latest way that Nikon Auto ISO reacts with flash (there have been three methods on iTTL models). If a hot shoe flash is used (a flash model recognized by the camera, meaning that can communicate with the camera), then Auto ISO will only advance at most 4x ISO (two stops) above Minimum ISO ...


1

As noted by others (and me) you need to find ways to use a faster exposure time to reduce true motion blur. It is possible to use post-processing to make the image look somewhat sharper. Whether this is an improvement is a matter of individual opinion. The image below was "played with" slightly. Very basic manipulation. Colour balance altered. Moderate "...


1

This is motion blur. This occurs due to a slow shutter. Since you were in the dim indoor environment its really difficult to have photos with movement without motion blur. If your main priority is to capture movement you might want to set your camera to shutter priority and set the shutter to something 50 and above. Always take test shots. This gives you a ...


1

My settings in this situation (action in full daylight) would be 1/2500th of a second and either ISO 400/f5.6 or ISO 100/f2.8 depending on which lens I was using. 2/3 over sunny f16, but accounts for inevitable falloff wide open. 1/500th seems way too slow. There's no reason to have any exposure automation in full sunlight--get it right once and lock it in ...


1

No. There are cameras that do though. However, they are almost all based on setting a parameter which decides how ISO is increased from its base sensitivity. In some cases (Pentax) you specify a relative rate, while in others (Nikon) you specify a minimum shutter-speed. Except for some Panasonic cameras, the change of ISO has nothing to do with the scene or ...


1

The question would be why is it taking a long time when using the optical viewfinder. Different metering is used for optical (using the metering sensor) since the mirror is down vs direct measurement using the CMOS sensor when the mirror is up (LiveView). Something may be wrong with your metering sensor. First I'd check to make sure your metering settings ...


1

Setting e2 is where you select the "slowest" (e.g. the longest) shutter speed you want the camera to use when an active flash is detected by the camera. You can still use a faster (e.g.shorter) shutter speed when e2 is set to 1/60! If e2 is set to 1/60, you will be locked out of selecting shutter times of 1/30, 1/15, 1/8, etc. (although in certain shooting ...


1

Here's something straight from Nikon. If the stock flip down diffuser is used on the SB800 (probably the 600 as well) then the camera is programmed to only sync at 1/60. There is a sensor in the flash that limits the camera. I flipped mine back up took a shot on a sunny day and the flash sync'd at 1/250 Hope this helps


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