12

Not attributing photos (or any other content) to web addresses is pretty much standard in major print media circles. There are probably a lot of factors involved, but it is likely as much about not promoting another business as much as it is anything else. If you want them to promote your business, I'm sure they would be happy to sell you ad space in their ...


9

Does that mean, that I can use that image(and other such images found on wallpaper hosting websites) without worrying about its license and attribution? No! Someone owns the rights to that image. If you are not the holder of the rights to that image or if the owner has not granted you a license to use the image then you are not allowed to use the image....


7

If photo is royalty-free and requires one-time purchase, can I take picture with camera of my screen and use it without paying for it? No. If stock and non-stock photo was taken from certain website and had title added to it, does that make it legit to use it? No.


6

No, of course you can't do those things. Taking a photograph of your screen is making a copy, just like using a copy machine or a scanner would be. Pay the price, or use public domain or Creative Commons imagery. If someone else's work happens to be in some portion of your photograph but only incidentally, you may be able to argue fair use (or possibly ...


5

Just because someone has copied something without paying attention to copyright does not mean that the actual author loses ownership. Wallpaper collection sites are notoriously loose with this. You're doing the right thing to stop and think. When doing a Tineye reverse image search and trying to find the actual source, looking for "oldest" is often helpful....


5

Even if it wasn't illegal in pretty much every legal jurisdiction in the world (maybe with the exception of the countries that are currently in a state of semi-anarchy), it is certainly a moral issue. The reason that people are charging for these photos is that they have almost certainly put a lot of time, effort and monetary investment into the creation of ...


3

The photos are licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution / Share-Alike license (the first is CC-BY-SA-2.0; the others are CC-BY-SA-3.0). Basically, you need a credit line with the author and license. The first photo's Summary block has a source URL of Flickr, so it is reasonable to construe that that indicates a requirement to list the originating URL ...


2

Such standards are usually up to the discretion of the publisher / reprinter, possibly subject to certain limitations, restrictions, or specification by the licensor. This allows for some creativity on the part of the person/organization licensing the photo to create a unified style for their publication. Associated Press: immediately following the caption, ...


2

It sounds like he wants you to sell him some type of agreement to either reprint, or use the images as you agree to. An example of attribution from the creative commons license: Under the Creative Commons Attribution license, commonly abbreviated as CC-BY, you are free: to Share — to copy, distribute and transmit the work to Remix — to adapt the ...


2

A royalty free image with a one time purchase means that the person purchasing it is granted the rights to reuse and distribute the image as much as THEY want. It is not giving rights to everyone who they distribute it to to then redistribute it. With royalty free images, you don't have the copyright to the image, you only have a right to redistribute ...


1

When faced with a similar situation, a "friend" asked for a commitment for additional work to be published in the future. If self-promotion according to your preference isn't available, they must be given some "incentive" toward loyalty in lieu of "yuge" monetary compensation. Is there any extra "wiggle-room" in the agreement. How long can they use it? Can ...


1

In general, attribution type depends how and where the photos are used. For printed material, like books: the photographer should receive proper credit for his work: his name and all image titles released under "Creative Common Attribution Share Alike 3.0". However, it doesn't need to be on the same page. It can be by the end of the book, with the page ...


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