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27

It sounds like you're doing almost everything right, but there's one detail that caught my attention: Aperture highest the lens offers. I'm assuming that this means that you are stopping the lens all the way down. You shouldn't do that, because the small aperture results in a less sharp image overall due to diffraction. See What is a "diffraction limit&...


18

A quick Google search for "Christy Lee Rogers making of" returns enough information: The pictures are taken underwater From this interview The effects in my images are created naturally in-camera using the refraction of light and movement in different depths of water. Light has a lower optical density in the air, while light traveling in water has ...


18

Edit: I wrote a Gimp script that does the steps below, and another one for Ilmaris answer. Both scripts are available for download on GitHub. The suggested way to go is this one. I’m answering this right here because I have been searching for a solution for quite some time and found a simple and working one. Let’s get to the result right away: Create a ...


9

I agree with the comments about aperture, but also don't forget about mirror lockup and using a remote release (or the timer function) for the exposure.


8

The method I've used myself is similar to yours, but uses the Resynthesizer plug-in (for GIMP) or Content-Aware Fill (for Photoshop) to reconstruct the gradient: Create a selection that completely covers the drawing. You can do this by hand, or you can use high-pass filtering to compute a selection mask like this: Start by using an edge-detection filter ...


7

Benjamin, I want to encourage you to consider something different than pursuing only sharpness. That is continue with the different techniques already discussed, focus stacking, super resolution, etc. However, add to your tool belt two sets of other tools. I say this because of your statement "I'm getting great shots.. but I want to capture all the fine ...


6

You camera isn't holding you back. I would think that slide film would be even harder for you to use since the time it takes to get feedback on your results will be measured, mostly likely, in days, not seconds. I've photographed my gallery owner's (Katherine Baltivik) works for her to have printed so quality was of utmost importance. Here's what one looked ...


6

Just looking at a picture does not tell you if it is a photo or not. A definition of a photograph is that an image (graphy) must be formed by photons (photo). In the case of the plane, the reason someone knows at first hand it is not a photo is that that plane never existed in the first place. Or simply know that a specific image is an illustration because ...


5

This answer describes the fastest reliable approach I know atm, based on the answer by Ilmari Kanoren. It is semi-automatic; the automatic mask does not work for hard images like the one below because there are no edges in some parts of the drawing. This Gimp script automates steps 3 and 4 (note that Resynthesizer is required), so the workflow is just: ...


4

Use the delayed shutter release (or a remote) will reduce any shake from touching the camera (which can still affect a camera on a tripod) and the mirror lockup which moves the mirror out of the way early again reducing any vibrations caused by the internal mirror moving during the shot. This may help along with the other advice about finding the sweet spot ...


4

There's an old saying about photography: Gear doesn't matter. While true, it is only part of the fuller truth: Gear doesn't matter... until it does. What that means is that better gear won't make anyone a better photographer. If the photographer is not applying the proper technique, skill, and knowledge when using lesser gear then better gear will not ...


3

While @Paul Cezanne has pretty much covered what you need to do, I'll add a few notes: Photographing the paintings outdoors has its own challenges: Movement due to breeze, and harsh shadows of brush-strokes, which will show up under close examination and create a false pattern. If you must, you can partly address both these concerns by fashioning a "soft ...


3

I happen to frequently photograph artwork, including framed and with glass. If possible, do this in a room that has black walls and no windows. If such room is not accesible, wich is my case, I use a black backdrop BEHIND the camera. This helps a lot against unwanted reflections. Also, as the other answers point out, place the lights a 45 degree or more ...


3

from my experience, glare is the biggest issue and the one most difficult to fix in post. While everyone says shoot head-on, I find that to be extremely difficult to producing a good image. I use assorted diffuse lighting, no flash. I've tried polarizing filter, but not on both the lens and lighting. What I find works best is to get even lighting by any ...


3

It is vital to know what you want the image for. If you are making prints from the image there is a limited upper size that you can achieve at fine art quality. In this questionWhich image sensor format for photographing oil on panel? I demonstrated that at 38 x 28.5" print size (!) from an ~A3 original you are better off using an A3 sanner than any 35mm ...


3

Make sure you are taking the photo exactly straight on with the optical center of the camera aligned to the center of the artwork. Imaging a line passing perpendicular to the camera sensor going through the center of the lens and it should reach the center of your artwork. To make this easier, place the camera on the tripod with a multi-axis level and ...


3

It isn't so much the camera body itself (that's just a sensor) -- it's more about the lens (photographer's understanding of the task is always important as well). Mostly what the DSLR camera body offers... is the ability to change lenses to something more optimally suited for the task. Optimizing Field curvature A lens focuses to different distances and ...


3

As this is the photography forum I will try to make a good approach using one. You need a camera with some kind of live view preferable. Get a tripod and position your camera pointing to the sheet of paper. I think a lower angle than the one you are using is probably more dramatic. Prepare a grid. Take a piece of cardboard, pets say size tabloid or A3, and ...


2

Not really I'd say. You need a camera with a decent macro lens. But I assume and interchangeable-lens camera system includes a decent macro (personally I really like the Nikon 105mm, but there are many other manufacturers who are no doubt good enough [and the 105 may be too long for your use case]) More important will be the tripod you use, the ...


2

Digital is better than film: easier film processing requires a pro lab. if using film, you should shoot on transparency which requires an accuracy of 1/3 of a stop. Raw files have +/- 1 stop flexibility. Raw files have colour temp flexibility. Digital is more sensitive to subtle variations in tone ~ therefore You should mix daylight and flash lighting ...


2

A flexible tripod with a level from a good brand A platform with two/three steps for shooting the artwork from an appropriate level (you may need, sometime) Consult the curator whether they will allow you to use a flash or not. Because in some art studios, it's strictly forbidden to use flash during taking a photo. If they allow using flash, get a ETTL flash ...


2

I shoot artwork regularly with my Nikon D300, i use a Nikon 50mm 1.4f on arounf 10f, 2x studio flashes, a tripod, and a colour chart. mount the artwork directly in front of the camera, 90 degrees in all directions. always shoot raw, and use a circular polarising filter. IF the artwork is oil, you may need to experiment with flash/ light positioning to ...


2

You have a D800 which has enormous resolution, so I think the way I would tackle this is to pull back a little and crop the result rather than filling the full frame. Your 50 f/1.8 was designed for a full frame camera (if I recall correctly) which means that on the T2i, you were hitting the lens center sweet spot. That's basically what I'm suggesting with ...


2

There's a somewhat similar question here, although it was more geared towards which camera was better I still think there's some value in looking into it for other misc info. As for distortion, pretty much every lens has distortion, the difference is that it's sometimes a bit more obvious in certain lens due to its design. Fortunately something like this ...


2

I would use the 50mm, stop down the aperture to f/4 or 5.6, aim for iso 200 and under a second exposure. I would also underexpose by a stop or two. I would tweak the contrast and sharpness in post, but you could try doing a custom picture style by adjusting the picture style contrast and sharpness settings. If you have a flash maybe consider adding some side ...


2

The short bio on her web site summarizes: Without the use of post-production manipulation, her works are made in-camera, on the spot, in water and at night.


2

About the digital processing part, you should avoid using the general purpose sharpening methods like unsharp mask, as these methods will only increase the local contrast — making details more visible but you won't get details back that have become invisible. It is better to use methods that are based on actually reversing the blurring due to imperfect ...


2

You could also consider trying using a wide aperture, (resulting in a narrow depth of field), and then focus stacking or several different exposures and exposure stacking possibly both - some software options can be found here. While focus stacking is normally used for macro photography it is not restricted to such use and can be very rewarding and should ...


2

Use a longer prime lens. The 50mm f1.8 comes to mind (it is a short tele for a crop camera, such ad the 700D). Canon lens don't come any cheaper, and this one has hardly any barrel distortion (design of normal prime lens has been mastered long ago, so they can be made both good and cheap). Align your artwork with the plane of sensor as closely as possible. ...


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