Hot answers tagged

88

Practice, practice, practice. This is something I set myself to do and it is progressing although not as easily as anticipated. Like you, I decided to simply not take the poor shots after having developed an eye for what is a good photo in my vision. I started with a ratio around 100:1 from before knowing what a good photo is! With a better idea of exposure ...


72

Totally not a photography expert, but I would still like to offer my 2¢. The mistake I often do is include way too much of the part of the image that isn't relevant to the scene, just because there's some nice details there. Generally that usually means "too much land, not enough sky", or "I have to look 'up' to see the horizon". In your case, I feel you ...


67

Legit contests which have entry fees have those fees because they get too many entries. Sure, they may offset some expenses, but basically the payment exists to make people think twice about entering. It's a basic "must be at least this serious to enter" bar. The scam, on the other hand, is the opposite — they've reached out to you, and expend a lot of ...


48

Stieglitz and his photo, "The Steerage" are hailed as great not because of its compositional excellence (at least one aspect of the composition is brilliant, and some of the lines in the frame can be seen as a kind of "proto-Cubism"¹) or the technical merits of the photo. "The Steerage" is most significant because it was one of the first times a photograph ...


20

I was tempted to mark this to be closed as "primarily opinion based" but then realized that I can prove that the "rule" of thirds is not a matter of opinion. Well, sort of. In one specific way. Maybe. First, accept that it's not a rule. Appropriated from Pirates of the Carribbean: Curse of the Black Pearl, Barbosa says "...more what you'd call 'guidelines' ...


16

It's a scam. They're trying to get you to pay them money for giving your images to them. Not only are they trying to bilk you out of some cash, the mere act of sending them your image(s), and agreeing to the terms and conditions of the contest, probably assigns them unlimited usage rights to, if not outright ownership of, the image. If the images are good ...


15

Your photo looks a lot like my "wish I'd done better" photos as well. The first thing that comes to mind is that you're trying to balance a couple of ideas/rules and end up with bland. Like the person with one foot on the boat and one foot on the dock: if you don't commit to one or the other, you fall into the water. In this case, if you really wanted to ...


12

Well the first thought I'd have is that this is begging for some post processing. You're completely wasting the highlights in that image that hide a fabulous sky. There are many ways to pull those highlights out without loosing the midtones and shadows. The image you posted is fine, but you haven't exploited it to it's full potential. Post processing ...


11

There are three examples I can think of: Shooting a portrait in bright sunlight. If you have a wide aperture lens, with something like F/1.4, and there is a lot of light, it could be that the fastest shutter speed of your camera (1/4000 or 1/8000 for example) is not sufficient. This means that the picture will be over-exposed, because you want to achieve a ...


11

Is this normal business conduct and am I safe to consider participation? I'm sorry, but why do you want to win this "competition"? You received an unsolicited message, asking you to upload one of your images to some site you have never heard of, and then they ask you to pay for the privilege?! Why are you giving this any consideration? Move along.


9

I'm going to add my 2¢ too even if it's probably repeating what others have said. POST PROCESSING FTW!!! You shouldn't be ashamed / scared of post processing. Even before digital professional photographers post processed their images. They also take 100s of images and select just a few to present so just be aware even they discard 99 out of 100 images (I ...


6

Not having ever been to art school or worked as a photographer/artist--(I've just been someone who professionally was once handed a stack of two hundred resumes to pick three interview candidates)--take my advice with a grain of salt, but I think the first thing you should do is ask the art school in question what they want you to show them in your portfolio....


6

Your question and explanation involves why. I can't begin to answer such a question here. Nobody can. It might even be off-topic; but, it's one of the most intriguing questions. Every photograph answers its own "why;" however, I propose a situation that may better allow you to decide for yourself: The next time you go off to capture your miracle, limit ...


6

This is the same picture cropped to follow the rule of thirds. You could keep the rule of thirds in mind when first taking it. In the original photo, the left half is water and the right half is land, which is like a giant divide down the middle. So the viewer has to choose between left and right. It's as if the artist is presenting a choice to the viewer: ...


6

To me, it this picture is a masterpiece because its author basically invented the concept of "telling a story with a photo", while working with a fairly new technology. As (relatively) inexpensive camera were only emerging, (The brownie got out in 1900, and the 35mm film was introduced in 1905), taking this image in 1907 is like creating a great vlog (good ...


6

Yes, DG lens serie from Sigma are compatible with fullframe cameras. About the effect seems like you enable in-camera lens correction. And this correct do not work well with 3th party lenses. Check page 200 of the manual of camera and switch off this correction


5

There is no ratio or particular number for division of the frame or placement of points which has any demonstrated special power. That includes both the rule of thirds and the golden ratio. However, the basic idea that centered subjects tend towards a more staid composition while off-center provides dynamic interest is fundamentally sound. Just don't get ...


5

I would dispute the statement that ambiguity and mystery are not a good thing in most parts of human life. Certainly engineering and science are about removing ambiguity and discovering facts, but I think ambiguity and mystery are a big part of the human condition and make life interesting. As for mystery being an important element, it is one element that ...


5

Things to think about: Mastering technique is paramount. Forget about "art". Reread the manual for your camera. Have you color calibrated your camera? Did you measure the light levels in the scene? Did you get the ambient and overhead light spectrum for your scene? The scene is oversaturated in blue due to the evening light. You should have used a filter to ...


5

Close one eye before taking the photo. Some images may look spectacular when seen in the glorious 3-D that your two eyes give you, but are a bit duller or more boring in the flattened 2-D that appears on a photograph. Closing one eye shows you what it looks like in 2-D, and therefore is a better representation of the photo.


5

This is a known issue when using certain third party lenses with certain Canon cameras that have in camera lens correction enabled. It seems almost totally random which camera and lens combinations demonstrate the issue and which ones do not. As Roger Cicala says in the linked blog entry, some lenses work with some cameras but not others. At the same time ...


4

If the E-510 you purchased is not modified for IR work, it may not be the appropriate tool. Digital cameras these days come with UV/IR blockers over their sensors to keep colors true (UV/IR sensitivity can throw off greens and purples on sensors). This blocker greatly reduces the IR sensitivity of the sensor. It doesn't completely reduce it, but it does ...


4

Long short, photography is different from human vision. The brain does a lot of pre-processing, post-processing, filling in the gaps, etc. It produces an "idealized" image in the mind. The camera is basically an eyeball. You aren't going to be able to capture "what you see" with a camera. So, do what the brain does-- take lots of images, disregard most, and ...


4

I am a street photographer and so my ratio of 'good' shots is trivial (perhaps 1:100). My definition of a good shot is not just a shot that is in focus or decently composed but a shot that is more than the content. These kinds of shots depend on tweaking something within the viewer that makes shot meaningful in some way - intellectually, psychologically or ...


4

From the Bernd and Hilla Becher entry on Wikipedia: They are best known for their extensive series of photographic images, or typologies¹, of industrial buildings and structures, often organised in grids. As the founders of what has come to be known as the ‘Becher School’ or the ‘Düsseldorf School’ they influenced generations of documentary photographers ...


4

I'm going to avoid talking about the goal of art overall — partly because I think that's explored nicely at What makes "fine art" fine art?, but also because the specific question of the of the role photography as an artistic medium has a definitive answer. In fact, let's take for granted the broader, general notions of "what is art?" — art as ...


4

She is on her own and has categorically amazing artists on her team. They pay attention to minute details to create an experience for their client. Which is it...she's on her own OR she's got a team? If she already has a business and a team, then she needs to hire a marketing professional. If she is alone, then she needs to start studying how to market. ...


3

The idea of figure-to-ground is that it should be easy to distinguish subject from background and foreground. A traditional tool for this has been light vs dark, or more recently, shallow field of depth. An outstanding color can provide a powerful distinction. For action shots, sharp vs blurred works well. Wide and ultra-wide shots could also show the ...


3

885x1024 sounds like your contact emailed the image to you and his email software/system has resized the image. Ask them to zip the image file and send it again, or use an online service like dropbox or OneDrive.


3

I have come across various formulae and recipes using silver nitrate and bromides mixed with a gelatin base. The ones that seem to be most consistent involve potassium bromide and silver nitrate, but recipes or lab techniques vary. Mark Osterman's Dry Plate Emulsion Recipe Silver Gelatin Unwashed Emulsion Simple Silver-Based Photographic Emulsion Suitable ...


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