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19

A great deal here depends on when you (generally) take pictures. In particular, with bright light, a smaller sensor makes little or no difference in quality. As the light level drops, however, a large sensor (generally) gains a greater advantage. So, if you're mostly taking pictures of the view from a mountain top in broad daylight, chances are that the ...


15

The main reason we don't have "super zooms" with a large constant aperture is size/weight/costs. Roger at LensRentals recently blogged about this in the post: About That 25-300mm f/2.8 You Wanted About How Big is that? The lens is in a video housing, so that makes it a bit larger than an SLR designed lens of the same specifications would be. But it'...


14

Essentially, your argument is correct as long as you understand that negligible and high-price are relative terms. You are correct that you get one or at most two stops advantage between a full-frame and an APS-C sensor of the same generation. More importantly so, the advantage is lower at low ISO sensitivities with modern cameras which are essentially ...


14

In practice this is not a concern unless you have very demanding needs. Now I would preface this by saying that my view of "image quality" is that many people, particularly beginners, tend to make the mistake of thinking of that in terms of pixel level quality or technical tests of particular parameters (like ISO performance). In practice an "image of ...


13

The most important thing for stock photography is composition/artistic vision. Next is proper technique which involves both the skill of the photographer and, for things such as night architectural work and most nature photography, proper hardware such as a sturdy tripod. Next comes high quality lenses. Only when all of these have been taken care of do ...


12

Actually the same 50-135 f/2.8 lens was sold by Tokina for other mounts, but it was discontinued in 2009. I'd say the primary reason is that there's no significant savings between making a telephoto lens just for APS-C or one that's also good for full frame. In fast telephoto lenses, the majority of glass goes towards achieving the big aperture needed, the ...


11

I own both lenses. I can't imagine the price difference between them being "small". So I just looked, $700 vs $1100... Both new, from reputable vendors. I wonder therefore if we are talking about the same glass. As with any two lenses, there are pros and cons to each, off the top of my head, here's what I would say for each: EF 24-105 f/4 L Pros: razor ...


11

Canon EF-S 10-18 or Tokina 11-16/2.8. :D Sorry. Neither one of these is ideal on a crop body as a landscape lens. The fisheye has too much distortion and would require defishing if you ever wanted a straight horizon anywhere other than the center of the frame. And defishing will cost you the edges of the frame, so it won't be super-super-wide (which is why ...


10

Ignoring for the moment aspect ratio, from a theoretical viewpoint there is will be no visual difference, provided you maintain the same subject & camera position / orientation the same angle of view the same resolution (number of megapixels) the same size entrance pupil (focal length divided by f-number) the same lens characteristics The first two are ...


10

Since this question was originally asked, the Micro Four-Thirds system has advanced and some of the earlier answers have become outdated. The latest generation of cameras has fast auto-focus although they still lag behind DSLRs for low-light and continuous tracking (eg birds in flight and sports) due to lack of phase-contrast autofocus. The lens selection is ...


10

In the "Canon's Full-Frame CMOS Sensors" whitepaper, dated August 2006, you can read the following, which kind of answers your question, although the manufacturing technology and the costs have probably changed to some degree since 2006: Thin disks of silicon called “wafers” are used as the raw material of semiconductor manufacturing. Depending upon its ...


10

Nikon 1.5X APS-C sensors in their current lineup are actually 1.52-1.53X depending on the exact measurements of the various different sensors in different models. Some older, discontinued models in the D3x00 series are slightly smaller at 1.55-1.56X. The difference between 1.52X and 1.53X is 0.65789 percent. The difference between 1.5X and 1.53X is a mere ...


9

For some sort of photography high ISO is very important. At some point the picture quality does not matter as much as having at least taken a photo, even if it is very noisy. News journalists or street photographers, who want to capture the moment do not have the time to light up the scene. Therefore they accept the noise to get the shot. High ISO is also ...


9

I'm sure you've heard the old saying, "The best camera is the one you have with you." Some of my favorite photos are shots I've taken with my three-year-old Samsung Galaxy Note 4, a phone with a decent camera but not a spectacular one. But it's in my pocket all the time, and when there is only a moment to grab a shot, there it is. You can certainly get ...


8

EF-S are not just optimized for APS-C cameras, they are made for those only. In other words, they will NOT work on full-frame models or even APS-H ones. The imaging circle the project is smaller which lets them be made lighter and more compact than equivalent full-frame lenses. The FLM (Focal-Length Multiplier) still applies when comparing the angle-of-view ...


8

Do you need a Full Frame camera for low light work? Not necessarily. Will a Full Frame camera give you better results and make low light photography easier? Most likely. The primary question is, "How much more are you willing to spend for an incremental increase in camera performance?" Ultimately the FF sensor is less noisy at base ISO than the APS-C ...


8

You can get more lens flare using a full frame lens on a smaller sensor when shooting close to the sun or other lightsources. The reason for this is simply the APS-C lens has a narrower field of view and so a lightsource just out of frame has no physical path through the lens. If you're using a full frame lens with the same composition then there is a path ...


8

The cost of manufacturing the larger chips is not simply the difference in the surface area of the two sensor sizes. This is the case due to the rejection rates of each for the same number of defects on a wafer from which the chips are cut. Assuming an APS-C sensor is 44% the surface area of a FF chip (Nikon, Sony, etc. Canon APS-C is slightly smaller at 39%...


8

It is more about ratios than addition/subtraction. 70-200mm is less than 3x from the shortest to longest focal length. That makes it possible to place all of the moving elements that enable the lens to change focal length in front of the aperture diaphragm. 18-135mm is 7.5x. Placing all of the zooming elements in such a lens in front of the diaphragm would ...


8

The confusion here comes in entirely because "35mm" is the common name for the 135 film format, also known as "full frame" — and it happens to be the focal length of the lens you are looking at. The specification is: 35mm equivalent focal length when used with APS-C sensor camera 52,5 And you are reading this as: Equivalent focal length = 35mm ...


8

I doubt the sensor is holding you back (for the record, I shoot Nikon). Much more goes into good IQ than just the sensor: lenses, lighting, and technique are all huge factors in the equation, this is why DxO scores should be taken as only part of the decision process. I think I would really consider investing time in a particular style of stock and refining ...


7

The basic question here isn't, "Which lens?" It is, "Who knows better than anyone else which lens will work for the intended usage?" I think the retired professional photographer with 31 years experience can probably best answer this question. More than anyone else he will know what he needs to do what he wants with his new camera. So then the next question ...


7

There is without a doubt a noticeable difference. The smaller sensor size, as you mentioned, gives a Micro Four-Thirds camera a disadvantage when it comes to low-light performance. The real question is: How much is this difference? Let me preface this by saying that I have seen and reviewed nearly every Micro-Four Thirds cameras on the market, as well as ...


6

Here's the basic problem with expecting a sub $200 telephoto lens to be good enough to consider using on an FX body later on: it ain't gonna' happen. The lens may fit and allow you to take pictures with it, but the results are going to be determined by the marginal quality of the lens rather than by the exceptional quality of the body. There are FX ...


6

Edit - One More Try (original below the rule) The noise level for a given photograph is specifically a consequence of one or more of: the ISO, with higher ISOs having more noise the size of the sensor wells, bigger wells tend to be less noisy for the same generation of sensors because they get more light for the same pixel the heat level in the camera, as ...


6

35mm is not wide enough for many types of general photography. With any group shots, (especially indoors) or any large outdor landscape scenes, you will need something like 16mm to 18mm to get everything in the frame. The easiest way to accomplish this is by going with the 18-55mm kit lens. I don't know what you read but todays kit lenses are much better ...


6

Short answer no - it will be approximately equivalent to the 50mm lens on a full frame camera. What you are referring to are issues of perspective. The perspective is not a property of the lens but is due to the position of the camera relative to the subject. If you are at the same distance from the subject you will get the same perspective no matter what ...


6

Beyond the sensationalist title, I think what you are asking is simply - Are my results typical? To which I'd answer, yes your results are typical and expected. I don't often try to shoot in the woods, in November, right before sunset, handheld, but if I did - I would be well aware that I am pushing the capabilities of my equipment no matter if I have a f/...


6

Just about any wide angle (WA) or ultra wide angle (UWA) lens used with an interchangeable lens camera will use a retrofocus design. That does mean larger, heavier, and more complex than a non-retrofocus design. But that doesn't mean all retrofocus lenses must be equally large and heavy (and expensive). A wide angle lens that uses a retrofocus design is ...


6

It doesn't really matter, but two decimal digits is more precision than is practically useful. ... or is it standard practice to round to only the first place with crop factor? This is good practice, if not always standard practice. That's because in practice, it doesn't matter. Few other things are going to be so precise that going to two decimal ...


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