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29

There is no clear answer: That depends on your type of photography. If you want the camera just to take the usual this and that photos, you are probably not missing out very much. The computational support in the phone has come quite a way. However, you will notice some limitations: Due to the small sensor, the performance in low light is limited. The phone'...


13

(I'm promoting my comments to an answer now that I have a little more time.) In addition to all the points brought up in other answers, there are several non-technical, "user experience", reasons that a DSLR is superior to a smart phone. The first relates to the "immediacy" of the controls. After a few (dozen) hours using a camera the ...


9

On top of what has been said, part of a photographer's skills is to make arbitrages between light received, exposure time, and depth of field. With a smartphone, you may experiment with framing, which is very important, but you won't really be able to experiment with light, exposure and depth of field. In a sense, it is like learning to play guitar with only ...


4

A lot of things have been touched on but upon re-reading your question and seeing you'd get multiple lenses 18-55 mm, 70-300 mm, and 50 mm prime. There is no way a camera phone is going to function with as much versatility as the package you're proposing. Digital zoom is not a feature. It's just cropping a photo. You won't touch a 300mm lens with a camera ...


3

Yes. The smartphones are small, easy to use, allways connected to networks, stuffed with all the filters... They, actually, replaced them years ago. But through point-and-shoot cameras. No. The smartphone geometry will never allow to build such optics that can barely close to the DSLR/Mirrorless. Each pixel needs some area to gather photons, the more area it ...


2

There is, of course, an XKCD for this: https://xkcd.com/1235/ Basically, what everybody else has said with particular emphasis on not relying on "megapixelage" as the sole metric of how good a camera is. Broadly speaking, you'll get a better photo with an old DSLR (let's say 3 megapixels) with a true zoom lens which allows you to frame your subject ...


2

A phone will be nowhere near as good as a camera if: You want long-range (planes, birds, wild-life, etc) You want a bit more creative control (motion blur, shallow dof, etc) You will edit the photos later on photoshop/lightroom/gimp/etc. I don't mean remove/add things, even for basic fixes like white balance, saturation, etc. Saving RAW, never jpeg. My ...


2

Changing the center of the vignetting tool in Apple Photos does not appear to be possible. The available settings are: Strength, Radius, Softness.


1

In recent years, I have seen smartphone photos taken by others that totally blew away any reservation I previously had about using smartphones for photography or video. The usual assertion has been that phone cameras : Lack ability to change the focal length. But when you look at what they have done, its really not much different from using a prime lens on ...


1

There are multiple good answers, but I'm going to approach it from a different direction: On an easy shot a modern phone is within the ballpark of a DSLR. While there still is a difference it rarely matters. What does matter is when the shot isn't so easy for whatever reason. Multiple answers have already touched on zoom--only optical zoom matters, digital ...


1

This is an old thread, but the A5000 can be used as a "webcam" using the OpenMemories-Tweak from ma1co on GitHub. I've successfully used this procedure (modified slightly since I used the macos version of pmca-gui) to output clean (ie: no on-screen displays) 1080p from the micro HDMI port. I use a $15 USB 3.0 HDMI video capture device and have ...


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