26

Lightroom gives you a lot more control over the processing of your images. You can finely tune vignetting (add and remove), curves, sharpening, split-toning, adding clarity, removing chromatic aberrations, powerful noise reduction, de-warping (lens distortions and perspective) "selective editing" (e.g. change the saturation/luminance of one color only, or of ...


9

Lightroom is pretty much the defacto standard for photo management. It has the backing of Adobe and this gives it more chance to last than the competition. This is a double-edged swords as some people are concerned that Adobe will abuse its power and force users to buy into a subscription model with little to escape since the majority of data is stored with ...


8

Photos for OS X The next version of OS X Yosemite coming Spring 2015 will have an application Photos for OS X that will integrate many of Apertures features. Photos for OS X is a new product that combines features from the soon to be retired Apple Aperture as well as Apple iPhoto. Photos for OS X is tied closely to other Apple cloud products, and edits are ...


8

In addition to the answer @max provided, an important feature of Aperture and Lightroom offer, is non-destructive editing. Basically, Aperture and Lightroom never make changes to your original images, but store the steps made to achieve the changes. See it like a 'recipe' to produce the changes; Aperture and Lightroom apply that recipe 'real-time'. ...


8

In June 2014, TechCrunch reported that Adobe are "committed to helping interested iPhoto and Aperture customers migrate to our rich solution". ArsTechnica, quoting TechCrunch, have a slightly different spin on the situation, saying that Apple's developers are "working with Adobe to work on a transitionary workflow for users moving to Lightroom". Presumably ...


6

On the side of open source options, in Apple OS X and Linux (but not in Windows) a nice option is darktable. I use it a lot (as an almost exclusive Linux user), and I am quite satisfied with the results(1). There is still no support for X-Trans sensors, but it is coming along. (1) caveats: I am not a pro. And I know that there are a lot of missing thing ...


4

Yes, you can do it several ways. With the image selected: Pull down the Image menu, then say Duplicate 1 Photo. ⌘-D Right-click or Ctrl-click the photo, then say "Duplicate 1 photo" None of these methods make a copy of the original file on disk, a fact you can verify by subsequently saying File → Show Referenced File in Finder. No matter whether you ...


3

From what you describe I do not believe Lightroom has an exact equivalent. Find Photos in Lightroom I understand why someone might ask the question that you have and desire that view. It is the standard view for graphical operating system folders such as Windows or OS X. The thing is when you have 10's of thousands of images and hundreds or thousands of ...


3

Canon will almost certainly always have a version of Digital Photo Professional to include with their cameras. Apple may not always support Aperture. (Yeah, I know. Hindsight's always 20/20) Additionally, it has been well over five years since the question was asked and most of the other answers written. Digital Professional 4 is a far different ...


3

You should buy a calibrator(x-rite or spyder are the two main brands that come to mind) and do the calibration yourself. Having it calibrated there won't necessarily do you much good. For a proper calibration you should do it right about as you want to edit those photos. And that's only after you have had your screen on for about 15-20 minutes. That's ...


3

In May 2019, Adobe published a free Lightroom plugin for Mac to help people migrate from Aperture and iPhoto libraries. It does exactly what you want. Migrate from Aperture to Lightroom Classic on macOS. Here is what it includes: METADATA Flags Star Ratings Keywords GPS Data Faces: Face naming tags are mapped to keywords Rejects: Files designated as ...


3

Within Photos, the only EXIF or IPTC data you can edit directly is what you see in the info window. There are some batch EXIF editing tools available for macOS on the Mac App Store: Photos EXIF Editor EXIF Editor (I've not used either of these, so have no idea how well they work.)


2

This is actually a very useful function for saving time and space when used correctly. I personally shoot in JPEG most of the time, but when I'm really concerned about redundancy and/or flexibility in editing after the fact, I'll shoot RAW+JPEG. Here's where the workflow is important: Import JPEG only - This is much faster, and most often your photos should ...


2

Is it possible that in Aperture it's not recognizing the full address, but only a city/state? If that's the case, then the geotagging is likely centering within a geographic range, getting you close to the right address, but not quite close enough.


2

Good news, Aperture now supports Leica M Monochrom DNGs! Enjoy.


2

My problem turned out to be a bug, and Apple has fixed it. I found this in the release notes for Aperture 3.5: "Addresses an issue that could cause the black and white points in Curves to shift incorrectly when using the eyedropper tools." Cheers, folks!


2

Aperture < Preferences < Import < Standard Previews I began noticing the same issue. I work with social media nearly 100% of the time so I don't shoot in RAW that often because I need to generate decent photos quickly and get them online (my iPad data plan would hate me if I started uploading those file sizes too haha!). Following the above path ...


2

The great thing about non-destructive photo editors such as Apple Aperture and Adobe Lightroom is that they do not make changes to the original photos. You are concerned about the corruption of the Aperture Library. The library contains references to the original photos which it calls masters. It also contains other data such as additional files derived ...


2

Capture One is awesome at RAW processing, and can also be used for organizing, tagging, and sorting. I've found the RAW processing to be better than LightRoom most of the time, although that's very subjective. On the down side, it's more expensive than LightRoom, and does not have plugins to upload to SmugMug, Flickr, etc.


2

Why would you move existing projects over? If you're thinking of moving to Lightroom you could start new projects there... but why not keep your existing Aperture projects for the moment. That way, when Adobe release a solution for migrating across you have less work to do. Or you can just migrate to Photos if that proves to be suitable for your needs.


2

Unfortunately, Aperture doesn't have built in automatic lens distortion- you need to buy the plugin PTLens, ~$25.


2

With "LCD screen", i assume you mean your camera's screen. The better question would then be "Why can't i see the the posterization on my crappy camera LCD?" and the answer is: because it doesn't have the quality of a real monitor. Also, on the camera, you see the jpeg preview, while in Aperture you see Aperture'S rendering of the RAW file. That said, i don'...


2

Unfortunately color calibration is a bit of a complicated field. For best results, you will want to use a color calibration device such as a Spyder or Colormunki. These devices are somewhat pricy, but a very necessary step for getting solid color accuracy. Software that comes with the color calibration units will display various colors on your display and ...


2

Changing the center of the vignetting tool in Apple Photos does not appear to be possible. The available settings are: Strength, Radius, Softness.


1

What I used to migrate my 120K+ library over to Lightroom was a new tool called Aperture Exporter. In addition to preserving the metadata, it has features to automatically generate JPEGs and TIFFs for adjusted photos so that your final outputs are retained. It also embeds "album" keywords into the metadata so that you can create Lightroom collections to ...


1

So, while I have a Mac, I've never specifically used Aperture. Nevertheless, the way I would attempt to solve this would be to export the version (not the original) to 16 bit TIFF and then import the TIFF and the original RAW into Lightroom. You might need a fair bit of disk for this... I assume you already know how to do this, but for others, see this ...


1

Photo organizing software is generally of two types, browsers and DAM/PIEs. A browser just browses folders that have images in them. Maybe showing just the images, or allowing albums to be made that are really links or paths to the photos. The images themselves are kept in what filesystem arrangement the user wants. Lyn, AfterShot Pro (in part), Graphic ...


1

A bad cable is the most likely reason for this. I've noticed (after extensively using USB, Firewire800 and eSATA) that USB is probably the least stable connection for an external drive. Firewire800 has been the best (most reliable) connection I've used for external drives.


1

Figured it out: apparently exporting with the ITPC information included causes many photos to be rotated.


1

There is a program made for this called RawHide for Aperture. I have used it myself to convert albums full of low-importance pictures from RAW to JPEG. You can have it delete the originals automatically and replace them with JPEGs, or keep both; you can tag pictures you've operated on; and there are quite a few more options.


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