10

This is actually a characteristic of the leaf shutter used in Fuji's X10/X20/X30 and X100 cameras. The leaf shutter can only travel so quickly. The wider the aperture is open, the slower the shutter speed has to be to accommodate the operation speed of the leaf shutter. It's a mechanical limit. In M and shutter priority modes, Fuji is allowing the faster ...


9

In Av (and Tv) mode, flash is not assumed to be primary light source, so camera will choose exposure to match metered ambient light. In P mode, however, the camera tries to ensure exposure time is quick enough for handheld shooting, and thus will happily expose for the flash-illuminated subject, ignoring the lack of ambient light. To put it in flash terms, ...


9

Yes. Constant Aperture is a reference to a zoom lens' maximum aperture at all focal lengths. It does not mean that it is the lens' only available aperture setting. That would be a fixed aperture lens. It some ways it is easier to shoot in aperture priority exposure mode with a constant aperture zoom lens than with a variable aperture zoom lens. (The ...


7

Both of your changes were in the same direction with regard to shutter speed, not in offsetting directions. Keep in mind that exposure values (EV) with higher numbers are for brighter lighting conditions and require shorter shutter times, narrower apertures, or lower ISO. Exposure values with lower numbers are for dimmer lighting conditions and require ...


7

No. This sort of feature is available on higher level Canon cameras where you can have one or more sets of "custom settings", but not on an entry level camera like the 1300D.


6

According to the Pentax K50 and K10D manuals, in P mode, if I select aperture, then program will choose a corresponding shutter speed, and if I specify shutter speed, then camera will select a corresponding aperture. Not entirely true. After reading the manual, you can't set values other than ISO. Av & Tv lets you set the aperture & shutter speed (...


6

In A,S,P,M modes, you have to turn Auto ISO on, in Setup menu, see manual. Auto ISO is automatically ON in Auto mode, but is not automatically ON in A,S,P,M modes, not unless you turn it On. User has choices unless in Auto mode. In A,S,P,M modes, you manually open the popup flash if you want to use it, and don't if you don't. You set Auto ISO On if you ...


5

In my experience (with a Canon, not Pentax, but it's probably similar), P mode is part-way between Auto and Av/Tv modes. The difference between P and full auto is that you are given the option of making creative adjustments, if you want. The camera will use its auto algorithm (or something like it) to choose an aperture and shutter speed, and you can then (...


5

In each of the 4 photos, the amount of sky and foreground has changed. The sky is very bright and everything else is much darker. This makes for a very challenging exposure for any camera. The camera metering had to decide between the light and dark areas and come up with a guess as to what the correct exposure should be. Your camera actually did a very ...


5

Originally you asked the camera to overexpose by one stop. When you set exposure compensation back to 0, the exposure time was halved. When you increased the ISO sensitivity by a factor of two, the exposure time was halved again. So you would expect an exposure time of 1/400s. That you got 1/500s instead is essentially a rounding error. The exact value would ...


5

Yes. Usually, the f/2.8 notation just tells you the maximum aperture (greatest diameter), but it does not say anything about the smallest aperture (smallest diameter). E.g. a 70-200 mm f/2.8 can keep its maximum aperture all the way from 70 mm to 200 mm, but you can always choose a smaller aperture, e.g. f/4 or f/11 (just two random examples - usually, you ...


5

There are two misunderstandings in your question. As covered already by Michael and flolilolilo, "constant aperture" means that the widest available aperture (smallest f-number) is constant across the zoom range; it doesn't mean that the lens can only shoot at f/2.8. Suppose that you did have a hypothetical lens that could only shoot at f/2.8. Then you ...


4

In your situation I would be using manual mode. If you really want to use Av mode, then you must disable "Safety Shift". You can disable it in the custom function menu. It is at the bottom of the C.Fn1:Exposure page in the camera menu.


4

The main way you balance out light against your needs for the image is the "exposure triangle" of the three main settings: ISO, aperture, and shutter speed. You have to choose your priorities: noise (ISO), depth of field (aperture), or the possibility of blur (shutter speed). Outside of these three settings, however, you do have two other options. You can ...


4

Aperture Priority is an Automatic mode. In all Auto Modes the camera will automatically set what it thinks is the correct exposure. Changing the Aperture, Shutter or ISO or will not change the exposure if any one of them are in "A" or "Auto". If you want additional control, you must use the Exposure Compensation dial to lighten or darken the photo.


3

The second and subsequent pictures should be darker. You increased the aperture size by 1 1/3 stops from f/22 to f/14 but reduced the shutter speed by 1 2/3 stops from 1/60 to 1/200. So the second picture should be 1/3 stop darker than the first. How did this happen when you only changed the aperture and the camera automatically changed the shutter speed? ...


3

Yes, this is generally the case. If you fix a value like aperture (which is what you are doing when you set the camera to Av mode), one of the other exposure factors must change — and the only other options are shutter speed and ISO. If you are using automatic ISO, that may or may not change first, according to your specific camera's program line. If you ...


3

Short answer: Assuming you're shooting in aperture priority mode, fiddling with the shutter speed or ISO actually won't change much. The exposure is automatically calculated by the camera for you and it tries to estimate what shutter speed + ISO will give you a correctly exposed photo. Assuming you're not happy with what you see after you take a photo using ...


3

Several settings could be causing your D40X to demonstrate the behavior you are describing when you are also using the built in flash. Check Custom Setting 10. If it is set to 'On' and the Minimum Shutter Speed is set to '1/60 sec', then the camera will increase the ISO rather than allow the shutter to be slower than 1/60 sec (see page 76 of the D40X Manual)...


3

Yes, this is normal. Assuming that this works the same on the D7000 as the D7100, search the manual for "standby timer". The c2 custom setting (on the D7100) controls for how long the settings can be changed after a half-press of the shutter button. The default is 6 seconds. You can increase this or set it to "no limit". Quoting the manual: The ...


3

I sent the question to pentax support and here is the answer: S: Cust. wants to know what the difference is between P mode and Tv and Av mode. T: At P-mode the shutter speed and the aperture will be set automatically. However, the cust. has control over the two values and he can still adjust them. Av mode prioritizes the aperture, so cust. ...


3

If the lens is entirely manual and has no electronic communication with the camera, then it is very possible that the camera is making incorrect assumptions about what to do with the metered light. Without communications, when you stop down to f/11, the camera doesn't actually know that. It could be assuming a faster aperture, in which case it will choose a ...


3

Canon DSLR's operate in so-called "slow sync" mode when in Av mode. That means, the exposure time is set to expose for ambient light, just like without flash. This is useful to freeze your foreground subject with the flash, but still get a natural background lighting. (try shooting a person at night in the open to see the difference!) I like to dial in a ...


3

Have you checked the mechanical linkage on the body that reads the aperture setting from objective to see if it is stuck? If it is not stuck try moving it by hand and see if the aperture reading changes. The mechanical aperture ring likage may be used to read the aperture ring position and if it is not in the pictured position and springed and moving around ...


3

Is there any way to make ISO settings independent based on exposure mode selected, meaning we could set ISO 200 for M mode and ISO 400 in Av mode and when the dial is switched from M to Av, the ISO will be 400, not 200? Since the entry level Rebel T6/1300D, along with the entire Rebel/xx0D/XX00D series, has no 'C' position on the mode dial this is not a ...


2

Have you checked the mechanical linkage on the body that controls aperture to see if it is bent? It is the tab on the left just inside the lens flange. even if the camera is not controlling the aperture, it may still attempt to use this linkage to estimate the position of the aperture set by the dial on the lens. Here's a closeup. the aperture control link ...


2

Where you're getting confused is in how shutter speed affects flash exposure vs. ambient exposure. If you typically don't use a flash, you assume that a longer shutter speed will create a brighter exposure, no matter what. In most situations, a flash burst is many times faster than your shutter speed. Keeping the shutter open for a longer period of time ...


2

If the shutter speed, aperture, ISO and other camera settings are all the same, photos should be identical. What M mode does give you is the ability to go beyond the max exposure compensation that Av provides.


2

In addition to shutter or aperture priority with fixed ISO, options include: full auto or program mode a program-shift mode, if the camera has one (from this camera's manual, it does not, but other brands do) an ISO priority mode, if the camera has one (again, not available on this camera) manual but without asking the photographer or checking the ...


2

While the actual questions you asked aren't very broad in scope ("should I use Av/Tv/Manual mode?", and "Is the 18-55 STM lens useful for my application?"), I think the details of your use-case open this up to a HUGE range of considerations. Should I use Av mode, Tv mode or manual mode? You should use manual mode, with automatic ISO. ...


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