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8

Short answer: No. Staring is something which indicates hostility and even people will look away if you look at them for more than a couple of seconds. Animals will normally go to great lengths and lots of posturing just to avoid a fight since there's little advantage to being the less damaged animal. To them the camera lens looks like one big unblinking ...


8

I think this is mainly an artefact of image processing, combined with the light in the photo. This could be accidental or deliberate. A crude automatic white balance process could get confused by all the green and shift the colours away from it (i.e. towards purple), especially if the image is also being lightened. The post was old, so in-camera white ...


8

Since the choice of lens is highly subjective, we can’t tell you definitively which to pick. Instead, I’ll offer a suggestion about how to make the decision yourself. Each lens has many variables that can be evaluated only with the specific lens: sharpness, bokeh, speed, physical dimension, weight, etc. But one thing you can test quite generically is ...


4

A general answer to this will be hard to give. It entirely depends on which species you're looking to capture. Regarding pets there simply are no general answer. Domestic animals live in a (often) mutual relationship with their owners and both the animal and their carers personality will come into play when you want to make them look into the camera. I'd ...


3

To rephrase Philip's comment: The choice of lens is a personal one. Personally, I do not like the Canon EF 50mm f/1.4 USM on APS-C, because shooting at (APS-C) 50mm is uncomfortable to me and I do not like the perspective, color rendition, bokeh, and sharpness it offers me. However, this does not tell you anything useful at all. Bokeh is a highly subjective ...


2

There are very few people out there with that job; it's an extremely tough discipline to break into. That said, here's what I'd work on to start down that path: 1) you need to be a good photographer. More than that, a good nature photographer, with a portfolio that stands out. So, go out and shoot. Shoot at zoos, shoot in refuges, shoot wherever you can get ...


2

Using a polarization filter does actually have an effect on fur. You can see an example in this article: How to Photograph Your Dog: 9 – Polarizers for Perfect Pet Portraits However, the effect doesn't help your case at all. What you would need would be to reduce the reflected light from the white fur while affecting the rest of the scene less. The ...


2

There are two components to the light being reflected off the fur. The predominant one is likely diffuse scattering. A polarizer won't help with that. There may be some more "reflection" looking sheen, especially if the light is coming from somewhat behind the cat. That probably is polarized, so a polarizing filter should be able to accentuate or ...


1

Like many "dream jobs", the one you describe requires a combination of multiple skill sets. You would need to master each of those skill sets before combining them in a way that makes what you have to offer unique enough to motivate someone to pay you to do it. Here are just a few of the areas in which you would need to become exceptional: Basic ...


1

Which Macro Lens? Over the next few days, you can trial each of your lenses by bringing them on walks to photograph small objects and critters you encounter. Bring the lens with which you get the best results. Shooting through Glass Bring a polarizing filter and tripod/monopod for shots through glass. You do lose light, but the way aquariums and ...


1

According to the Wikipedia article on Nick Brandt: In 2001, Brandt embarked upon his first photographic project: a trilogy of work to memorialize the vanishing natural grandeur of East Africa. His photography from 2001 to 2012 bore little relation to the colour documentary-style wildlife photography that is the norm. He photographed on medium-format black ...


1

If a speedlight isn't enough, chances are good you'll have to move up to more expensive, bigger flashes, which in turn may require bigger, sturdier support gear and modifiers. Most folks would typically recommend a studio strobe, and if you're on a budget and in the United States, one good option are the Paul C. Buff lights, such as the Alien Bees or ...


1

One thing you can do is to set manual focus and focus at the desired distance e.g. 5 m. Set the camera in shutter priority, with a time of at least 1/250 and an ISO that suits. Your next goal is to catch the dog in focus, but you can help that by shooting burst.


1

If you spend enough time watching any animal you can pick up their habits and time your photograph. Most wild animals will regularly look around for predators, and if you are patient you can work out the pattern to it. For example while birds are feeding or preening, they will regularly look up and around for danger for a few seconds, then resume what they ...


1

Provoking wild animals (even to make them turn towards you) is not a good idea, specially at close distances. If using longer lenses 400mm+ and trying to provoke them by making a noise or throwing stones will just make them alert and they will disappear after a while. Sometimes, however the animals (in wild) will look towards you if they hear/feel you move ...


1

While the Canon 7D/100-400 zoom is an excellent package, it is large and heavy and expensive. The megazoom cameras make an option that will be attractive to some people. I carry the Panasonic FZ100, which has an effective focal length of 25-600 mm. Today's entrants go out to around 1300 mm. They weigh around 1.5 lb (700 g). Mine replaced a old Canon ...


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