Hot answers tagged

28

I used to be a pro, so I can answer this: This is absolutely normal; it is even very good! I consider 30 good pics out of 400 a very good result! The most important point is IMHO that you go over your shots and select. The "reflection process" is important. It is the place where you learn to take good pictures. This is what most amateurs don't do. And this ...


26

You've got to show them examples of your work that make them want you to produce similar work with them. In other words, you need a portfolio that demonstrates you can make it worth their time and effort. Of course that poses the question, "How can I build a portfolio if no one will work with me?" You have to start small. Check among your friends or family ...


26

Yes. Presuming you're working as freelancer. Without a doubt. Regardless of how much you're being paid, or if you're not being paid (such as if you work with models). If you're employed rather than freelance then the company's existing insurances will probably protect you, but make sure to check. Professional indemnity insurance protects you from any claims ...


23

One thing to consider is what style of photographer you fashion yourself as. Some schools take more pictures than others and see different success rates. Are you shooting sports? You have no control over the action so you're probably going to spray-and-pray until you get the perfect shot. You may only get 1 sellable photo out of 1000. Are you shooting on ...


20

Please don't take this the wrong way, but... I suggest you do a lot more learning and practising before you try doing this as a business. I don't see anything in your wedding photos which convinces me you have the skill to take photos people will be happy to have paid for. Other than that, you're buying almost entirely the wrong gear for portrait ...


19

You are right, a wedding is hard to do. But it is not impossible and we all have to start somewhere. One of the biggest challenges is going to be staying ahead of the program and getting in the right spot at the right time. Much of wedding photography is being prepared for the "next shot", getting yourself positioned and close enough to the action, and ...


16

Wow, are you hosed. You tell them the price before you start. Its too late now. Traditionally, wedding photographers made all their money off prints. If you give them soft copies, you cut yourself out of that profit stream. Bay Area, NYC, Chicago, etc. I wouldn't consider doing a shoot unless I got at least $100 per hour for my time. Plus I'd want more to ...


15

I did a wedding earlier this year, and having never done one before had the same fears as you. For me, the following points were very important: Talk to the bride & groom in advance. Discuss what they want from you out of the day. They are the MOST IMPORTANT thing for you to consider. They may ask for formal shots at the church, or informal shots at ...


13

I am somewhat surprised by all the answers that the OP is basically screwed. The lack of contract is a double edged sword, so the newlyweds have the same problems if they are not willing to pay a fair price for the pictures since they did not negotiate up front either. The OP may be able to walk away without giving them anything if they refuse to pay a ...


10

As the other answers do a good job of giving you the fish, seeing as you're an engineer, this answer will teach you to fish. The angle of view of a lens & camera combination is simply determined by the isosceles triangle whose base is the diagonal of the camera's sensor size, and whose height is the lens's actual focal length. The vertex angle of the ...


9

For reference I paid $1600 for around 50 photos in the cheapest book the photographer had to offer. We could select photos from 1000 for review, out of which a lot of them were duplicates, closed eyes, weird faces and pictures of trees, pots, and vases. He was only there for the ceremony, and 30min photo shoot with us afterwards, and my wife's getting ...


8

Extremely important for professionals. Most magazines publish photographs, not excuses. So if your camera gets attacked by a bear, falls into a lake, gets stolen, you still have to be able to bring back photos. Many events are once in a lifetime or occur extremely infrequently, which gives you only one chance to capture them. For amateurs there is ...


8

How do you feel about photographing yourself in the nude? No, I'm not suggesting the typical selfie (selfy?). I am suggesting that you take the project on with all the deliberation you would photographing a model. Light, accessorize, pose, and compose for your optimal effects for your available "model." I think it will present some significant and relevant ...


7

Before I start: Past a certain point (where the camera does not limit the ability of the photographer to take the photos they want to), it is the photographer who makes a photograph good (with composition etc.), NOT the camera. This question is one only you can answer completely, however, as always, guidance on where to begin can help. Below I have made a ...


7

Rather than considering a whole new camera, as the S95 is a rather nice little thing, you could chuck a small tripod in your backpack for these shots. This would allow you to compose you shot with your wife and use the self timer for the photo. Gorillapods are tiny enough to go in your pocket and can grip onto benches, railings, or branches or you could ...


7

Professional: Short answer: Are you mad ? !!!!!!! [ :-) ] Longer answer: For a professional lack of a backup body is ~= "death-deferred". You could consider that "being able to access an alternative acceptably quickly at an acceptable cost" is the equivalent to having a backup body, so if you were a studio only photographer and there was a 24/7/365 ...


7

Check your local arts and painting classes to see if they have nude modeling classes; go check them out and ask the models directly. Have a clear notion of what kind of nude photography you want to do (boudoir, nude, sexual or not...). As Michael wrote, have a small portfolio available to show potential models.


6

Take a spare of everything. Keep checking your settings, it's really easy to walk inside briefly, change ISO then go and shoot the rest of your outdoor photos at ISO 6400! Likewise you could be grabbing a few candids during the formal portraits and end up shooting the second half of them at f/1.8 Likewise check the results your getting to make sure your ...


6

I've done almost the exact same kind of gig, but for my cousin. Now, knowing what I know now, I'll not be doing wedding photography as a line of work, but... She was happy, I wasn't as much. Anyways, from my experience: You will need a longer lens. I went with two bodies (both Pentax K-5s) with a 17-50 f/2.8 and a 70-200 f/2.8 as the lenses. I used them ...


6

Here would be my topics How to Hold a Digital Camera How to buy the right equipment for you Composure - Some basic rules and how to break them Shutter/Aperture settings - How they affect your shot Depth of field Lighting and Exposure How to use flash What is ISO? How to pre-focus and use auto focus effectively An introduction to White Balance Lenses and ...


6

One approach would be to look at the top questions on this site, and to make sure those things are addressed in a helpful and organized way. You could even reuse the content from here, since all user contributions are licensed under the sharing-friendly Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike license. Translation into local languages is very much a part of ...


6

Most contests that have an amateur category clearly define what they consider the difference between pro and amateur to be. If you can't find it in the fine print of the contest rules, contact the organizers and ask them. Most of the ones I've looked at fall into three broad categories: A professional is a photographer who derives all or almost all of their ...


6

We hired a family member who is trying to get his professional business off the ground. He charged $500 for the day, plus $250 for a photo CD including rights to copy/share/print. That was a steal; the next lowest bidder wanted $1000 for the day, required us to buy a precompiled album (included in that $1000 "sitting fee"), wanted an additional $200 for a ...


6

There's nothing obviously wrong with the image. You've got a very narrow depth of field, so the grass in the foreground and background is out of focus, but that's not surprising if you were shooting something relatively close at a long focal length. There's some chromatic aberration (red and purple fringing) in the unfocused areas, which also isn't ...


6

If you have no existing rep, it's hard to get a start because you just come off as some kind of Leisure Suit Larry sleeze bag. Not sure how people get established on the internet. Friend of mine had the problem. Solution: Always have female with you when you make contact. Even on phone calls, skypes etc. Wives are best, girlfriends second, then sisters, ...


6

Legally need? - No. In reality - It's a good idea, but depends on a few factors such as if you are going to be doing this a lot, are you using expensive equipment? does anything you do or can do affect safety of others? If you screw up or your camera dies, is it s big issue for the client? Or are you just walking around taking a few candid snaps? You ...


5

So, looks like the photos had lights with different temperatures. Looks like a cool light source on the left and a warm light source on the right. A straightforward approach would be to take it into Lightroom and apply a gradient with a countering color to cool the colors down from the right or warm up the image from the left, so that you have an equalized ...


5

It depends on the amateur and the pro. It also depends on the type of work being done. Some shooters work very methodically and set the table for a specific shot before the lens cap even comes off the camera. They may only take a handful of exposures. Other situations call for a more liberal approach to the number of frames exposed. But even then the ...


5

I've tried to capture the rays of light in the forest many times, and have largely only had middling success. Eventually, however, I realized that the problem is one of contrast. The contrast between the dark forest and the bright light is what makes these scenes interesting. The solution is to increase the contrast between the rays of light and the ...


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