21

The answer is basically the same as this one on white balance and raw. You're right, it doesn't matter at all in how the image is recorded or stored. As you note, the selected color space applies to the preview image and to the histogram. The camera also may make metering decisions intended to avoid clipping (overexposing to the full saturation point) in ...


12

It's just the values from the sensor, which is a (mostly) linear counter. The different photosites on a Bayer sensor have different colored filters, and the value for each site represents the light which gets through that filter. The name "RAW" is meant to convey precisely that the values are simply that "uncooked" reading. In a sense, then, the RAW file is ...


9

If everything is working correctly, the difference should be subtle and you shouldn't generally notice a big shift. I have a suspicion: You may be working on a monitor which is not capable of rendering the whole Adobe RGB gamut. In this case, out-of-gamut colors are clipped or approximated (perhaps poorly). When you convert to sRGB, the colors are mapped ...


8

It has no impact on the RAW data. It may not even affect the embedded JPEG used as preview but I am not certain about that. The point is that RAW images do not have color info at each pixel and so are not in any color-space. They have color primaries correspond the the wavelengths that the Bayer filter on each pixel but that is fixed and cannot change with ...


7

ProphotoRGB is the color space which defines the gamut. This RAW file size is controlled by the color depth (such as 14 bit). A 14 bit depth is the same size in AdobeRGB and ProphotoRGB. A jpg is 8 bit regardless of gamut chosen.


7

Carol, are you sure you have the U2414M? That's Dell's medium gamut variant of the monitor, covering about 75% of Adobe RGB. So I think that if that's the monitor you have, it's behaving as expected. See this review on TFT central for details. Dell's terminology here is unfortunately confusing, since previously the U2413 (with no M) was the wide-gamut ...


6

Digital cameras and films to do not have "primaries". The spectral sensitives of digital cameras and films dictate their response to various wavelengths of light. These native responses are sometimes encoded relative to a set of encoding primaries such as rec709, adobeRGB, Kodak ProPhoto (aka RIMM/ROMM), or ACES but these encoding primaries have nothing to ...


5

Actually, #E58C4E, if you mean the web color, is defined to be in sRGB. However, if you didn't mean that particular convention but rather "red:229, green:140, blue:78", it's a different matter, because the extremes (the "primaries") of each channel are different in different color spaces, so those numbers actually do represent something different in each ...


5

That Adobe seems to butcher the colors of all my raws drives me nuts You are wrong here. What you see on the back of your camera is not the raw file, but the JPEG preview, which includes whatever setting you dial in your camera. That includes contrast and boost of saturation. LR cannot reproduce the same look from the raw file, because the process is ...


4

The real key is going to be that you'll want true 8 bit color resolution rather than the 6 bits that most TN panels get. Off angle color changes is also a key issue when looking at choosing a good screen for any color sensitive work. Having a wider color gamut is helpful, but if I had to choose between a more limited color gamut on a S-IPS panel with good ...


4

There is no global color space. A color as you specify is just a triplet of Red, Green and Blue. Each component has a value between 0 and 255 (0 and FF in hex) which indicates how much power to give each LED for a given pixel (or phosphor in the days of CRTs). The scale is relative to your monitor and its current settings. This is why monitors need to be ...


4

[afaik] Unless the display driver or application being used applies a color profile or similar to compensate for the wider gamut, the color codes you use in your application will be sent to the display as-is. And in the display a specific color value (say E5) is no longer interpreted in the srgb scale but in the wider gamut scale. So why does the display ...


4

All other things being equal, saving file in ProPhoto instead of sRGB or AdobeRGB shouldn't increase the size. But ProPhoto files should be always saved in 16 bit color to avoid posterization. Compared to 8 bit workflow with sRGB the files are larger...


3

If you review the top answer to this question: How do color spaces like sRGB and Adobe RGB overlap? you will see that the sRGB color space is completely within the Adobe RGB color space. Therefore, there should be no issues with 'missing' or odd colors. However, it you are going to display on the web, most assume sRGB color profile, so it could look washed ...


3

The in-camera color settings don't affect RAW in any way. Changing color space (i.e. from sRGB to Adobe RGB) changes only the look and embedded color space of your in-camera JPEG, and also the JPEG preview embedded in your RAW files, that you see on the camera display and in most image viewers. Raw data is just that, raw data, it contains only raw light ...


3

It's hard to say what the 'Standard' setting is supposed to do on each particular monitor. From my experience with similar monitors, where there are 'actually standard' presets like sRGB or AdobeRGB and then some others, the Default or Standard preset can be one of two things: The 'native' display, without any built-in corrections. The 'best looking' ...


3

One thing I don't fully understand is why, when I take a photo with a Nikon and import it in Lightroom, the colors immediately appear desaturated and visibly different than what it looked like in the camera. This is just a different interpretation of the raw data. Lightroom can't read the preset information from Nikon files, it seems and applies some sort ...


2

It does not matter what you set in camera as RAW. RAW is RAW, it is not modified until post. Most monitors will not display aRGB and many printers do not print aRGB. I select aRGB as the assigned profile and my printer tells me much is out of gamut. I am forced to work in sRGB as that is where my color gamut is for my monitor and printer.


2

More generally, what is the nature of the gamut? Primaries as peak sensitivity don't behave the same as primaries for mixing output. I suppose this is necessary to know for RAW importing and would be explicitly stated in a DNG file. Do they vary greatly between cameras? The output from the sensor is RGB based, so if interpreted simply as three ...


2

I found this page which includes the illustration: It reminds me of how the human eye works, which I'm sure is not a coincidence. The similarity is that the difference in red and green spans most of it, with blue breaking the tie by picking out the left side. The green right slope comes down around 630 and blue picks out the half left of the green peak. ...


2

An RGB image stores, for each pixel, an R value, a G value and a B value, which combine to define the colour of that pixel. Using 16 bits per channel (for example) allows for 281 trillion distinct colour possibilities for each pixel. This takes up the same amount of storage space regardless of the colour space of the image, whether it's sRGB, Adobe RGB, ...


2

If I stick to Case A: Could I be sure that everyone (with calibrated monitor) will see my photos as me in smart "viewers": ACDSee Pro, LightRoom? Not if the other calibrated monitors are only 96%, or 90%, or any other portion of sRGB other than the exact same 99% of sRGB that your monitor renders. The 1% your monitor can't display may even be different from ...


2

You can't, just from coverage percentage numbers, because you can't tell exactly where the overlap in three-dimensional colorspace will be from a single number representing area. See How do color spaces like sRGB and Adobe RGB overlap? for details. In practice, I would expect most monitors to give you coverage numbers for both of these color spaces. And, I ...


1

If your monitor covers the AdobeRGB gamut then it does that all the time usually. There are some high end monitors (BENQ and EIZO come to mind) that have modes for the sole purpose of quickly previewing things as though you're a "normal user" with a cheap monitor. But it has absolutely nothing to do with Adobe software suite. Your Greens will be the most ...


1

Use a software RIP (Raster Image Processor) as your printer driver. When you print from most software applications, you are at the mercy of the operating system, the software and the printer driver. A RIP takes direct control of rendering your photos so that they will look their absolute best when they are printed. You can make high quality prints on your ...


1

I think the main error is that your Working Space is set to your monitor profile. The monitor profile is actually adapted "live" as it's drawn to screen & should not be part of your workflow. You should always check that the correct monitor profile is in the drop-list for that tab, but you should select your actual intended gamut there - AdobeRGB for '...


1

Your issue is that some applications are color managed, and some not. in your example, firefox is a color managed browser, so it is smart enough to see the sRGB profile and convert it to AdobeRGB (or more precisely to the profile of your monitor which is close to AdobeRGB). Edge I guess is not. Photoshop is smart, so images should appear fine there. This ...


1

Windows 7 (and other versions, probably) let you choose separate colour profile for each display. This can't be limited based on how displays are connected. Whether the software which you work in will manage colour properly (i.e. will moving the windows containing the image to the other display preserve colour or will the image be displayed equally in ...


1

If you are not using calibrated screens, then you will get this kind of issue. The Mac screen may be particularly bright and if it isn't calibrated to be comparable to the other screens, then you will end up mixing the image darker than in needs to be to look correct on the other displays. Building an ICC profile for all the displays will allow for the ...


1

As Raymond Chen would put it, developers hate to pay taxes. Colour management is a very big tax on Windows. Developers are expected to ask Windows what colour profile to use and then do all the RGB conversions themselves. (And let's not even get started on the added challenges of multiple monitors!) Most developers don't know any better so they just draw ...


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