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On my computer when I am in ACR and do B/W conversion when press "\" I get colour image. Second press of the same button return me to B/W version. P.S. Same work for me in Lightroom (as before and after)


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For most uses, the standard color profile for your camera ("Adobe Standard") should be sufficient. However, you may prefer the look of one of the other profiles for specific images. According the the SpyderCheckr (Windows, Macintosh) help files: It is recommended that the "Adobe Standard" option be selected in the camera profile popdown ...


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If you go to "Crop" in the Develop Module, you can choose between "As shot" which will give you the in-camera cropped version, or "Original" which will give you the full frame version of the RAW file.


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It's not exactly using the a*/b* CIELAB channels/values; even though that is what it looks like. When you set the temp towards the blue side of the slider you are telling the program that the light was warmer (lower kelvin) and it needs to add blue light to the scene... and light is additive color (RGB). However, anything in the scene that is showing a color ...


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Your two images look essentially identical. Here is a map of the difference once one is scaled to match the other: The white is the pixels where the difference in level is 3 or more (difference along contrasting edges is due to rescaling). As far as I can tell the purple bands are in both images, and it indeed looks like banding: A smartphone is not a good ...


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What you are probably seeing is the difference between how your display devices scale down the larger image and how they display the smaller image when you look at it on Instagram. Viewed at the same size, there's no significant difference between the two images.


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I fixed it. Adobe told me to clear my cache, which didn't work. I did two things that appeared to work, not sure which one did it. First, I deleted both Photoshop and Bridge, chose the option to not keep any preferences in case their was a hiccup in them, then restarted the pc. Second, under Camera Raw Preferences, DNG File Handling, I selected "Embed ...


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Adobe actually describes extremely well their white balancing process in the Digital Negative (DNG) Specification, specifically in Chapter 6 Mapping Camera Color Space to CIE XYZ Space. The process is not super trivial but the core principle is to compute a matrix converting from Camera Space, i.e. space the captured image is upon capture, to CIE XYZ ...


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This is a more tricky question that you might think. First, the RGB value that you see with your eyes on the screen are the result of an operation on the processed output from Lightroom, that is defined by the calibration of you screen. So beware what RGB values you measure. Second, when you are adjusting color temperature, what you are really doing is ...


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If you look at my related answer here: https://photo.stackexchange.com/a/122262/20809, the White Balance process of Adobe Photography products, i.e. Adobe Lightroom and Camera Raw, is outlined. As for automatic White Balance, and given an image, you can, for example, compute the average chromaticity coordinates in a centre area of the image and use that as ...


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The basic answer is "it depends" on what settings are selected in LR/PS (Lightroom/Photoshop). Most of the time it is based on in-camera processes that set the color channel multipliers in the EXIF info but raw conversion applications, including LR and PS that both use ACR (Adobe Camera Raw) under the hood, can be set to use other things instead. ...


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