20

Sounds a bit iffy to me... A card, by itself, DOESN'T have a fixed L*a*b* colour - that's a product of the reflectivity of the card at different wavelengths and the intensity and wavelength distribution of the illumination. In the dark, L* will be 0. Light it with a coloured light and your a*b* will change. Light it with a "white" light with a different ...


12

This frequently comes up in photographic reproduction jobs where one is trying to closely approximate some other object such as a painting antique drawing. This cannot be done with typical photographs even when adjusting them to a specific, matching, LAB color. Regular photographs increase color saturation and tailor contrast, boosting the midranges and ...


11

The display corruption could be a consequence of using GPU acceleration in the ACR module. Not all cards are supported, so try toggling off the option. Also make sure that option is off in Photoshop.


9

The raw image is 12 (or maybe 14) bits, and JPG is 8 bits (less range). JPG does not handle changes of extreme range well. The JPG image already has white balance and color profile in it, likely our bad guessed try that has to be corrected first (which is the reason we are looking at it). Not even speaking of JPG artifacts, the Raw always is the ...


7

White balancing when implemented correctly (like in Lightroom) ensures that whites stay white under the new illuminant, essentially mimicking the chromatic adaption performed by the human visual system. When you white balance a photo in Lightroom you are effectively picking an illuminant / whitepoint colour temperature for your photo. The result of that ...


6

DNG convertor is standalone software, independent of any other software. Adobe camera RAW/Lightroom are part of Adobe Creative cloud. So updating DNG convertor have nothing to do with updates of Adobe Creative cloud. By definition (simplified): DNG convertor - convert RAW files to DNG, free Adobe Creative Cloud - Lightroom/Photoshop/etc. - photo ...


5

The limitations when working with JPEG image files, as compared to working with raw data, isn't so much in the application used (unless it is a poorly written application - which could be the case for either raw or jpeg processing). The limitations are self-imposed by choosing to edit a JPEG image instead of a raw file and by the way previously converting to ...


5

If you are referring to this EIP File Format – Enhanced Image Package, the format is specific to Capture One. Support by other programs is unlikely, and Adobe's list of supported file formats for Photoshop does not include it. If you don't have the original files from which the EIP file was created, you may be able to use a standard unzipping tool to ...


5

Come to the light side. We may not have cookies, but we have legitimate free software. The creators of Photoshop, as is their right, decided to keep the internals of the program proprietary and to charge money for access and use. But, other programmers have decided to take a different approach and created RAW-processing software like Darktable and ...


4

The support for the Canon 7D's RAW files was incorporated in Camera Raw 5.6 and the latest version of Camera Raw supported by Photoshop CS2 is 3.7 so there are no support for the .cr2 files created by the 7D in CS2. Unfortunately there is no way of opening these files in such an old version of Photoshop (unless there's a strange hack that I don't know of) ...


4

According to the Adobe help on camera raw: To toggle visibility of the mask overlay, use the Show Mask option, press Y, or position the pointer over the pin icon. To customize the color of the mask overlay, click the color swatch next to the Show Mask option. Then, choose a new color from the Color Picker.


4

Lightroom likes to use reverse psychology :) It does so in numerous places but it color temperature is one of the more obvious one. You are right that diminishing the color temperature of an image should make it more yellow. However, what Lightroom is doing is letting you specify the color of incident light to indicate how much correction is needed. As you ...


4

Photoshop is a general purpose raster image editor, and as you state it requires an intermediate step in order to open a RAW file (which is not, as such, an RGB raster image format). Once Photoshop has opened the image and edited it, there are a number of file formats that you can use to save the image, some of which are capable of keeping the image as 16-...


3

As far as I know, the only values that can be brushed are the ones shown in the brush. I would guess that Adobe feels the others are out of the scope of lightroom, which is "only" a image editing tool, not an image creating tool like photoshop. So maybe you'd need photoshop and use the RAW file from there.


3

Canon 6D was added to Camera Raw 7.3, which requires CS6. I think your only options are to use the DNG converter, upgrade Photoshop, or switch to another tool like Lightroom.


3

It shouldn't make any difference, they are both tools created by Adobe with the same processing engine behind them. As long as the versions of camera raw are in sync, its the same thing. Use whichever one suits your workflow the best. If you spend most of your time working a single image at a time and in PS, then stick with that. If you edit thousands of ...


3

I would imagine the advice was given to crop in ACR vs PE because edits within ACR would be non-destrctive vs PE which would be editing a JPEG in a destructive manner. I don't use either tool directly but this would be my assumption. For example, once you crop and save in Photoshop Elements, the image is overwritten and the cropped portion of the image lost(...


3

So the only solution appears to be: Install Exiftool (Free) Open Terminal and navigate to the directory containing the image(s): For a single image called BD3A6291.CR2 with dimensions of 5760 x 3840 execute: exiftool BD3A6291.CR2 -AspectFrame="0 0 0 0" -DefaultCropOrigin="" -DefaultCropSize="" -CroppedImageWidth="5760" -CroppedImageHeight="3840"


3

A camera profile may consist of several operators, including: A linear transform (a matrix) from the camera RAW color space to CIE XYZ color space (used to compute the conversion transform to ProPhoto RGB, which is the working color space of Lightroom). An HSV lookup table - Similar to the HSL function in Lightroom, but provides much more control on the ...


3

There is this Adobe blog post with link for ACR for Photoshop CC or CS6: http://blogs.adobe.com/crawlspace/2011/03/keeping-photoshop-up-to-date.html#notconnected


3

The slider in Lightroom is not used to adjust the color of the light that lit the scene. That light has already been recorded. Rather, it is setting the correction for the light in the scene. The correction provided by any raw converter needs to be the "reciprocal" of the light that illuminated the scene. That is, the correction needs to be on the opposite ...


3

On Windows, they can be found at: X:\Program Files\Adobe\Adobe Lightroom\Resources\LensProfiles\ On Mac, they should be here: Applications/Adobe Photoshop Lightroom X/Right-click Show Package Contents/Resources/Lens Profiles Source: Julieanne Kost: Where does Lightroom Install Camera and Lens Profiles?


3

They're all proprietary. Each application uses their own algorithms to convert the raw data. To the best of my knowledge none of the adjustments made with one application will translate identically in another application unless both applications use the same raw conversion engine "under the hood" (e.g. Adobe Lightroom and Adobe Photoshop both use Adobe ...


3

In short One can utilize the Adobe Camera Raw(ACR) bundled with Photoshop Elements(PSE),as if it were near-native to Bridge Creative Cloud(CC) (read below for the caveats though, because there are some quirks and some things you cannot do) What works and what doesn't The Adobe Camera Raw included with PSE seems to be a separate instance from the CC ...


3

Correction — the linked article (including the comments thread following it) suggests that the .NEF format undergoes a linear quantization only for some consumer-grade DSLR cameras. Mathworks.com user "Craig" says (in comment #4): I did some checking and Nikon’s consumer-grade DSLRs (D90 and below) do indeed compress the raw sensor data from 12 bits to 9-...


3

I have figured out the problem. For some reason, with hardware accelerated graphics for Camera Raw, it was displaying sRGB incorrectly. To fix: In Photoshop, click Edit > Preferences > Camera Raw..., then at the bottom, untick Use graphics processor Update: As of Camera Raw 10.0 this bug seems to have been fixed for me


3

I discovered it was the graphics driver. It needed updating and there is still a little lag, but it is almost unnoticeable.


2

Welcome to the "Photoshop Tax" on getting a new camera body. The main thing to keep in mind is that RAW is not an acronym, a file format, or a standard. It's merely a file that contains the unprocessed (raw) contents of a sensor data dump. Every camera model has a different RAW file format. The .CR2 files from a 5DMKII are different from the .CR2 files ...


2

In Photoshop CC, go to the top menu bar, select the word 'filter'. In the drop down menu select 'camera raw filter'. Your current layer will then be opened with the camera raw editing window. OR The keyboard shortcut is: shift + ⌘ command + A (select them all at the same time).


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