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10

Most probably, this is due to the lighting and its continuous pulses. The Digital Picture has an excellent article called "Flickering Lights (Why are some of my pictures dark?)" that states: The problem images [...] have usually been captured under fluorescent or gym/arena lighting and a short exposure was often used. Shooting action sports with a fast ...


6

Any suggestions of how to fix this? Replace the lighting with a type that does not flicker at the rate of the cycle of the alternating current powering the lights. Use shutter times longer than one-half full cycle of the flickering lights. For countries where alternating current is 50Hz, that would be 1/100 second. For countries with 60Hz AC, that would be ...


3

I read that the Canon 7Dmk2 has a killer feature for sports lighting which times the exposure to synchronize with the lights. To fix in post, try shooting a burst which will get the stipes in different positions on each frame. Stack them (auto-align) in Photoshop and use brightest choice for each pixel via blending mode and parameters.


3

In person, the sign is pure white. The light and dark yellow-tinted bands looks like a flickering issue, which is common with many artificial light sources. Some cameras have an anti-flickering setting. If such a setting is not available, you can try dropping the shutter speed to something like 1/40. If the problem goes away, you can gradually increase the ...


2

I'd forget domestic lighting altogether. I doubt anyone is going to bother making it flicker-free because it's not on the list of requirements for your average household. Google, eBay, Amazon etc & search "video lighting panel RGB" for many options, from $£€ 50 upwards.


2

Flickering was the unavoidable effect of the image display method in CRT displays and therefore it was always synchronized to the frame rate. In today's LCD screens there is no connection between flickering and the refresh frequency, because it's not the screen what flickers, but its backlight. (this also means that unlike CRT, some LCD screen will not ...


2

Neon lights - especially true neon lights (as opposed to flourescent striplights, where a lot depends on the actual circuitry used. True neon lights usually run straight off several kilovolts AC from a transformer) - do have a dark/partially illuminated phase in every mains half cycle. Any camera that does not capture all parts of the image at the exact ...


1

The flicker or banding is caused by the light pulsing while the sensor rows are scanning across the frame. It is possible to reduce this if you have your speed at multiples of the electricity Hz. In the US, AC electricity is 60 Hz, so that is 1/60th a second. This may not always solve the issue though. For photography, if your camera allows it, you can use ...


1

I had the same issue when shooting my son's gymnastics meets and my daughter's soccer matches (outdoors, under lights). I learned (here, I believe) that I should turn off Auto White Balance, and instead select a fluorescent or tungsten balance (or use a meter to determine & enter the value in K). While it still left some dark images on occasion (...


1

If the whole scene is illuminated by a single light source, it might be possible to create a "flat frame" by taking a picture of the uniform white background illuminated by that light source, and then using the flat frame to compensate your photo for uneven illumination (divide the photo by the flat frame in photoshop/gimp/other). Preparing a good quality ...


1

It's almost impossible to remove them in post. You'd basically have to repaint the image digitally. Choose a shutter speed that is slow enough to solve the problem in advance and in camera - it's always a better idea to solve problems as soon as practical. Sadly, I don't know a good formula to determine the best speed, but you could just take a few test ...


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