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6

Yes. There is no reason I'm aware of that makes the 85mm f/1.4D a bad choice for a D750. According to reviews, it is a very good lens, both in terms of optical quality and mechanical stability, as is mentioned for example here. (In fact, the author of this blog specifically mentions that the lens works well on the D800). Autofocus and electronics of the ...


5

You seem to be under the misapprehension that all lenses should cost what a 50mm f/1.8 costs. The 50mm lens is actually the outlier. The focal length lends itself to simpler designs. An 85mm lens, to achieve f/1.8 must have glass that covers an aperture opening of 85mm/1.8 => 47.2mm vs. a 50mm/1.8 => 27.8mm. So it requires bigger glass elements throughout, ...


5

The 85mm requires bigger glass elements to be able to offer the same aperture f/1.8 as a lens with a shorter focal length. This alone makes it cost more. In addition, it becomes heavier so it also needs a more powerful focus motor.


4

If you are shooting under fluorescent lighting, you can use the same camera, the same lens, the same exact settings, etc. and still get varying results. That is because fluorescent lighting flickers. As the alternating current powering the lights reverses polarity the intensity, color temperature, and spectrum of the light will change. In most countries the ...


4

Hard to tell, but most likely it's nothing to do with the lenses and everything with the camera settings. DSLRs, especially when on automatic modes, tend to try to do a lot of colour compensation for you. And when shooting in incandescent light, there's a distinct yellow tint to the light that the camera, when not set at the proper metering for incandescent ...


4

Maybe. If you are primarily concerned with AF accuracy, a lens with an electronic connection to the camera and an internal SWM will very likely provide more shot-to-shot consistency than a lens focused by a mechanical connection from the camera (assuming the body, such as your D750, is from the last five years or so). Mechanical connections are much more ...


4

The same 85/1.8 lens is sold under different names, including Neewer, Opteka, Bower, Vivitar, Lightdow, and others. You don't state what camera, mount, or purpose you want these lenses for, so they may or may not meet your needs. I have used the Neewer 85/1.8 variant. It is reasonably sharp, but doesn't feel sharp (acutance) when used wide open. Like most ...


3

Pictures on the Nikon ad show it's a Jintu, or at least a Jintu box. Jintu say that's an 8-blade aperture. Picture shows 6. You could get one actually purporting to be a Jintu for the same price… or you could save your money. A very very similar Neewer on eBay is £80 & may even be the same thing in a different box. These things often are. I'd say you ...


3

I just spent a few weeks with the viltrox 85mm f/1.8 for a review project I've been working on and I've shot the Sony FE 85mm f/1.8 in the past. It's not quite as perceptually sharp or punchy as the Sony and the colors aren't as vibrant. Chromatic aberration is definitely a lot more noticeable on this lens than the Sony and of course, it's heavier and manual ...


3

I want to expand my lens collection with something more suited for portraiture. A portrait is essentially any photo with a person as the primary subject. There is no particular lens suitable for portraits. However I get the impression your problem is not going to be solved by lens purchases. Why ? Currently, my longest lens is SEL55F18Z, which is just ...


2

Zeiss 55 1.8 is a very expensive lens. I believe you could get two used Sigma Art 1.4 lenses to roughly the same price. If you want to get the shallow depth of field then cropping is not what you want to do. That translates to a higher aperture value, and makes more in focus. I have no experience of the Zeiss, but I have two Sigma Art and prior to ...


2

The first few paragraphs of juhist's answer can be confusing, so stated a bit differently: A 55/1.8 lens in crop mode will produce an image that looks like one made with an 83/2.7 lens (but exposure will still be calculated with F1.8). If the reduced aperture look (F2.7) and the reduced resolution (10.6mp), are acceptable to you, crop mode may work out fine. ...


2

Be aware that there is current controversy about identically-looking inexpensive lenses sold under different brands, rumoured to be from the same OEM. For example, there are some brands offering lenses that look like Laowa products; however Laowa claims that they are NOT Laowa OEM products but blatant counterfeits (Laowa announcement https://twitter.com/...


1

More worried by the specs: Mount: for CANON DSLR Mount Compatible Brand: For Nikon Otherwise you find a "Neewer 85mm f/1,8" on Amazon at about the same price that looks a lot like it and could come from the same plant. You can check the comments of Amazon purchasers, they likely apply to the eBay cousin Buying on Amazon could be safer (return policy, ...


1

The plan seems to be good (with crop mode, you see the cropped result in viewfinder, if Sony works like EOS RP works, as an answer to the comment by Andreas), with one caveat. Do note the 55mm / 1.8 = 30.555 mm aperture opening in 55mm lens, whereas 85mm / 1.8 = 47.222 mm aperture opening is in 85mm lens. The 55mm / 1.8 and 85mm / 1.8 lenses are not ...


1

One note, the Zeiss Batis is f/1.8 while the G master and Nikkor is f/1.4, so Batis is if nothing else a bit slower. My guess will be, although I don't know, the Batis is sharper than the other two. As to the Nikkor not having AF, well is all about using a smart adapter. You can get this smart adapter if you wish AF with your Nikon lenses on E-mount: http:...


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