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35

What's a nifty-fifty? It's a budget level 50mm prime lens. Pretty much all of the various camera makers offer one. There are several reasons that make them so nifty. Price - They're some of the most inexpensive prime lenses¹ available for most systems. Performance - They can compete optically at 50mm with zoom lenses costing much more. Maximum aperture - ...


17

Rachael, it sounds like your aperture is set to a wide aperture (low f-number), allowing lots of light in, but at the expense of a very narrow 'depth-of-field'. This creates a thin slice of focus where anything before or after is blurry. Let's assume you're 2 feet away from your subject when taking a photo with your 50mm lens. Most common SLR 50mm lenses ...


16

If you're going to be moving around Manhattan all day, you'll probably want to bring some sort of bag with you to carry things like a light jacket (it can get chilly in the shade, or on the water, and certainly in the evening), a bottle of water, a map, a guide book, things you might buy along the way, etc. I'd recommend a backpack, but one that doesn't ...


12

What would I have to do to take such photos from a 50mm lens of a Dx camera? You can't take those pictures with a 50mm lens and a DX (1.5X APS-C) camera. To fit all of what an 11mm lens will give you you'd have to back up five times as far. But that would change the perspective, or distance relationships between the various parts of the scene. To get those ...


11

The 50mm 1.8G is a great lens. But there isn't going to be a huge difference in image quality using any of the 35mm or 50mm primes. I don't think anyone but you can really answer which one is more suitable for you. There may be some situations where you can only get so close, or so far, to frame your shot, and one focal length or the other might limit you ...


9

At f/1.8 the depth of field is very small - any movement (of subject or camera) between focusing and taking the shot can push the subject out of focus - so you want to take the photo as quickly as possible after focusing and don't use the "focus and recompose" technique - not at f/1.8 The auto-focus on the 50mm f/1.8 is very slow, if the camera is set up to ...


9

The STM version replaces the II version. Optically, they are identical. However, the STM has several advantages: 7 rounded aperture blades vs. 5 non-rounded (no more pentagonal bokeh) Metal lens mount vs. plastic A much improved manual focus ring STM vs. Micro Motor (should be faster and much quieter) FTM (Full Time Manual) focusing 13.8" (350mm) MFD (...


8

This is known as purple fringing. It is occurs because you have a region of very high contrast. It is normal that this occurs in extreme cases but better lenses show less of it. The good news is that software like Lightroom have tools to deal with this automatically. The Lightroom tool in particular handles not just purple fringes but other colors due to a ...


8

(Personal opinion) It depends on you. The big advantage of the zoom lens is... you can zoom. With it you can make shots from all places without having to move so much. Lady Liberty - zoom - click - done Using a 35mm prime forces you to zoom with your feet, move yourself through NYC in order to get the best shot. Lady Liberty - hey, she doesn't fill the ...


7

Back in the 35mm days, the 50mm was the default lens focal length. It was believed that it allows for most shooting styles with some compromise. That assumption was based under the dominant aesthetic of the time (60's and 70's IIRC). In the 80's, consumer cameras (such as the Olympus Trip) came equipped with a 35mm lens. This made it easier to use them in ...


7

There is a technical reason for not incorporating image stabilisation in a typical high speed Gauss type lens. Optical IS requires a moving lens component that displaces the image laterally without defocusing. This can be done in most multi-component asymmetric constructions, by moving some component controlled by a stabilising sensor. However the heavier ...


7

For an outdoor wedding, it sounds like you should be crossing the golden hour near the end, but still have strong light. The bigger trick will be the angle at which the sun goes down. You will want to shoot with the sun behind you if at all possible. The fact that the wedding is outdoors is actually advantageous to your cheaper camera as light levels ...


7

Notice the different perspectives in the image above, for lenses of differing focal lengths, caused by the distance between the camera and subject having to be changed - to keep the ratio of subject size to image size similar in each example. Cropping a wide angle image to a longer equivalent will not remove this effect. Moving closer, with a wider lens, ...


6

This sounds to be a simple matter of you not focusing on the right part of the image. You don't mention what camera you have, but if it's a DSLR it will have the ability to spot focus. Spot focus lets you manually determine what the camera autofocuses on rather than leaving it up to the camera to decide. You will be able to select it in your camera's ...


6

As much as everyone loves to talk about how sharp the "nifty fifty" is, if you look at the ISO 12233 charts here you see that it is much sharper at f/2.8 than at f/1.8 or f/2. The lens is manually focused using Live View for the test charts. You may not be missing focus as much as you think. Is there an area behind or in front of your target that is in ...


6

You said you own an 18-55mm zoom lens. You can just set that one to 35mm and 50mm (there is a scale on the barrel that tells you what focal length your current zoom position corresponds to). That way, you can see the field of view each focal length gives you for yourself. Even though the same focal length will give you a different field of view on ...


6

If you have a specific style you’re going for, link an image in your question and we could advise on lens selection. That being said, product photography more heavily relies on lighting and set up than anything else. 50mm should do you just fine to start. If you find yourself not getting the angle of view that you want for your shots, then we can start ...


5

When you put the camera up to your eye and press halfway on the shutter, the camera will pre-focus and either one or many of the focus points will light up(red) in the viewfinder. This is the camera telling you which focus points it plans on using if you fully press the shutter button. It also tells you which parts of the image will be sharpest and in focus ...


5

One thing to note about the 50mm F/1.8 is that it's a fairly cheaply constructed lens. If you touch the focus ring you should notice that there's some slack in it whereas if you use other lenses of a higher quality you'll notice that they are much more tightly constructed. While the slack in that part of the focus ring probably isn't directly relevant to the ...


5

Yes you are correct the 50mm on an DX body(D5100) will give you the field of view of a 75mm lens on an FX body. Generally speaking, 75mm is somewhat tight as a general purpose walk around lens. 50mm is more commonly used for this, and to get that effective field of view on your camera you would want something around 33mm or so(which you already have in your ...


5

Focus shift with the EF 50mm f/1.2L is not a flaw in manufacturing or quality control that certain lenses exhibit. It's due to the optical design,which leaves some spherical aberration uncorrected, meaning that each point of light does not hit the sensor in a uniform plane, the circle of confusion has a curve to it, that causes the plane of sharpest focus to ...


5

The D7000 has a custom setting that allows you to use either the camera or the aperture ring on a 'D' lens to select the aperture. For the camera to control the aperture, be sure you have selected Sub-command dial (and not Aperture ring) in the Custom Settings menu-->f6: Customize Command Dials-->Aperture setting. It is on page 233 of your D7000 User's ...


5

The best 50mm lens is the best one you can afford and are willing to buy. You knew that :-). Your budget affects the answer substantially. The Sony A58 SLT is an excellent camera but is several steps down from the top of the Sony SLT APSC range). That plus your statement re having a kit lens suggests a low to moderate budget. You can notionally obtain ...


5

This is a known issue with the EF 50mm f/1.4. The most common cause of the problem is that the guide slots at the end of the focus collar inside the lens have become bent. The most likely cause for the bent collar is an impact to the lens, such as being dropped, when the focus is set to a short distance. Sometimes turning the manual focus ring very fast will ...


5

Sure, take a picture of the same subject with the same lens settings and the same lighting conditions, using film Canon/Nikon SLRs loaded with the same film stock. Develop the film and compare the results. You can use a lens before buying it by renting. Rent the two lenses. Also rent a camera, such as a Sony A7R (or other E-mount camera), along with a Canon-...


5

Sure, there are multiple sites that let you head-to-head shots of test charts against each other or test results. the-digital-picture.com's shot comparison dxomark.com's test results comparison But whether or not you get any meaningful information about how they perform in use in the field is questionable. The reality is that these are very similar ...


5

The 85mm requires bigger glass elements to be able to offer the same aperture f/1.8 as a lens with a shorter focal length. This alone makes it cost more. In addition, it becomes heavier so it also needs a more powerful focus motor.


5

You seem to be under the misapprehension that all lenses should cost what a 50mm f/1.8 costs. The 50mm lens is actually the outlier. The focal length lends itself to simpler designs. An 85mm lens, to achieve f/1.8 must have glass that covers an aperture opening of 85mm/1.8 => 47.2mm vs. a 50mm/1.8 => 27.8mm. So it requires bigger glass elements throughout, ...


5

A prime lens has a much simpler design, so for the same price, and weight, you can get larger lens elements and therefore a higher aperture. However, there are some other factors to what you're asking. In the case of a 18-55 zoom lens, the lens has to have a retrofocal design, because at the wide end you are going down to much smaller effective focal ...


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