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35

What's a nifty-fifty? It's a budget level 50mm prime lens. Pretty much all of the various camera makers offer one. There are several reasons that make them so nifty. Price - They're some of the most inexpensive prime lenses¹ available for most systems. Performance - They can compete optically at 50mm with zoom lenses costing much more. Maximum aperture - ...


16

If you're going to be moving around Manhattan all day, you'll probably want to bring some sort of bag with you to carry things like a light jacket (it can get chilly in the shade, or on the water, and certainly in the evening), a bottle of water, a map, a guide book, things you might buy along the way, etc. I'd recommend a backpack, but one that doesn't ...


12

What would I have to do to take such photos from a 50mm lens of a Dx camera? You can't take those pictures with a 50mm lens and a DX (1.5X APS-C) camera. To fit all of what an 11mm lens will give you you'd have to back up five times as far. But that would change the perspective, or distance relationships between the various parts of the scene. To get those ...


9

At f/1.8 the depth of field is very small - any movement (of subject or camera) between focusing and taking the shot can push the subject out of focus - so you want to take the photo as quickly as possible after focusing and don't use the "focus and recompose" technique - not at f/1.8 The auto-focus on the 50mm f/1.8 is very slow, if the camera is set up to ...


9

The STM version replaces the II version. Optically, they are identical. However, the STM has several advantages: 7 rounded aperture blades vs. 5 non-rounded (no more pentagonal bokeh) Metal lens mount vs. plastic A much improved manual focus ring STM vs. Micro Motor (should be faster and much quieter) FTM (Full Time Manual) focusing 13.8" (350mm) MFD (...


8

(Personal opinion) It depends on you. The big advantage of the zoom lens is... you can zoom. With it you can make shots from all places without having to move so much. Lady Liberty - zoom - click - done Using a 35mm prime forces you to zoom with your feet, move yourself through NYC in order to get the best shot. Lady Liberty - hey, she doesn't fill the ...


7

There is a technical reason for not incorporating image stabilisation in a typical high speed Gauss type lens. Optical IS requires a moving lens component that displaces the image laterally without defocusing. This can be done in most multi-component asymmetric constructions, by moving some component controlled by a stabilising sensor. However the heavier ...


7

For an outdoor wedding, it sounds like you should be crossing the golden hour near the end, but still have strong light. The bigger trick will be the angle at which the sun goes down. You will want to shoot with the sun behind you if at all possible. The fact that the wedding is outdoors is actually advantageous to your cheaper camera as light levels ...


7

Notice the different perspectives in the image above, for lenses of differing focal lengths, caused by the distance between the camera and subject having to be changed - to keep the ratio of subject size to image size similar in each example. Cropping a wide angle image to a longer equivalent will not remove this effect. Moving closer, with a wider lens, ...


6

As much as everyone loves to talk about how sharp the "nifty fifty" is, if you look at the ISO 12233 charts here you see that it is much sharper at f/2.8 than at f/1.8 or f/2. The lens is manually focused using Live View for the test charts. You may not be missing focus as much as you think. Is there an area behind or in front of your target that is in ...


6

You said you own an 18-55mm zoom lens. You can just set that one to 35mm and 50mm (there is a scale on the barrel that tells you what focal length your current zoom position corresponds to). That way, you can see the field of view each focal length gives you for yourself. Even though the same focal length will give you a different field of view on ...


6

Based on the following evidence: Both pictures are underexposed or simply have dark zones on it's borders (black zones are more sensitive to parasitic light inside the camera) Looking at the interframe, the affected zones of both images point to the same interframe. Looking at the interframe, the affected zone extends beyond the pictures, onto the film ...


6

If you have a specific style you’re going for, link an image in your question and we could advise on lens selection. That being said, product photography more heavily relies on lighting and set up than anything else. 50mm should do you just fine to start. If you find yourself not getting the angle of view that you want for your shots, then we can start ...


5

Focus shift with the EF 50mm f/1.2L is not a flaw in manufacturing or quality control that certain lenses exhibit. It's due to the optical design,which leaves some spherical aberration uncorrected, meaning that each point of light does not hit the sensor in a uniform plane, the circle of confusion has a curve to it, that causes the plane of sharpest focus to ...


5

The best 50mm lens is the best one you can afford and are willing to buy. You knew that :-). Your budget affects the answer substantially. The Sony A58 SLT is an excellent camera but is several steps down from the top of the Sony SLT APSC range). That plus your statement re having a kit lens suggests a low to moderate budget. You can notionally obtain ...


5

The D7000 has a custom setting that allows you to use either the camera or the aperture ring on a 'D' lens to select the aperture. For the camera to control the aperture, be sure you have selected Sub-command dial (and not Aperture ring) in the Custom Settings menu-->f6: Customize Command Dials-->Aperture setting. It is on page 233 of your D7000 User's ...


5

This is a known issue with the EF 50mm f/1.4. The most common cause of the problem is that the guide slots at the end of the focus collar inside the lens have become bent. The most likely cause for the bent collar is an impact to the lens, such as being dropped, when the focus is set to a short distance. Sometimes turning the manual focus ring very fast will ...


5

Sure, take a picture of the same subject with the same lens settings and the same lighting conditions, using film Canon/Nikon SLRs loaded with the same film stock. Develop the film and compare the results. You can use a lens before buying it by renting. Rent the two lenses. Also rent a camera, such as a Sony A7R (or other E-mount camera), along with a Canon-...


5

Sure, there are multiple sites that let you head-to-head shots of test charts against each other or test results. the-digital-picture.com's shot comparison dxomark.com's test results comparison But whether or not you get any meaningful information about how they perform in use in the field is questionable. The reality is that these are very similar ...


5

The 85mm requires bigger glass elements to be able to offer the same aperture f/1.8 as a lens with a shorter focal length. This alone makes it cost more. In addition, it becomes heavier so it also needs a more powerful focus motor.


5

You seem to be under the misapprehension that all lenses should cost what a 50mm f/1.8 costs. The 50mm lens is actually the outlier. The focal length lends itself to simpler designs. An 85mm lens, to achieve f/1.8 must have glass that covers an aperture opening of 85mm/1.8 => 47.2mm vs. a 50mm/1.8 => 27.8mm. So it requires bigger glass elements throughout, ...


5

A prime lens has a much simpler design, so for the same price, and weight, you can get larger lens elements and therefore a higher aperture. However, there are some other factors to what you're asking. In the case of a 18-55 zoom lens, the lens has to have a retrofocal design, because at the wide end you are going down to much smaller effective focal ...


4

Adjusting the focus collar that gets bent when this lens is dropped with the focus set to anything other than infinity can leave the elements it supports decentered or even slightly tilted. With such a shallow depth of field any defects in adjustment are very easy to spot when using wider apertures. Your lens either needs a trip to a Canon Service Center or ...


4

A common answer is that slightly longer than normal lenses such as your 75mm FF equivalent are great for portraits. Two reasons for that are: The angle of view is about right for filling a frame with a person from a distance that won't cause a lot of perspective distortion. If you stand close enough to your subject to fill the frame with their face using a ...


4

As with many technical specifications that are used to compare cameras and lenses, much more is often made of the differences they exhibit in precise, controlled testing environments than the effects of those differences in real world situations. In the case of the EF 50mm f/1.2L, the focus shift issue seems to come into play most often when extension tubes ...


4

As I've tested (took 10 series of shots) the 50mm f1.8, I've come to this result: If the lens starts focusing from the nearest focus point (inner barrel is fully out of the outer barrel), then the image will be very-very front focused. If you set the focus ponint to infinity, and then start autofocusing, then the image will be as I say 98% spot on focused. ...


4

Provided you have more than average skills with fine mechanics, it can be done. The lens focusing mechanism has a couple of guide rails, which are probably loose and must be reattached in order to have it working normally again. When the second of them came loose, focusing became hard, as the focusing rail probably would twist and not be aligned when ...


4

I'm curious why you want to compare these lenses? Surely you're not trying to decide whether to buy a Canon or Nikon camera based on the quality of their consumer-grade nifty fifty? There are so many other factors like sensors (Canon insists designing their own mediocre ones, while Nikon uses the best it can get [usually Sony]), ergonomics, metering ...


4

They're fine. This is an easy lens design, but they're also made to be low cost, without a lot of glass or super-exotic elements. For the purposes of actual photography (as opposed to benchmark scores), there is virtually no difference. It sounds like you are using this comparison to choose between systems. I wouldn't recommend that. The actual impact to ...


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