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24

You can use Photoshop's Vanishing Point filter for this. It's easiest to use a 3D-capable version of Photoshop,¹ which I presume you have, since you haven't mentioned any other 3D software. There is an alternate path for those using a version of Photoshop that lacks the 3D features, which I will cover inline below. This technique works best with a ...


15

All conventional photographs are 2D representations of 3D scenes. Our brain creates the illusion of depth based on cues from the image. This process is easily manipulated, see forced perspective or a famous example the Ames room. Some images contain a particular blend of contrast, vivid colours, lighting direction, DOF and sharpness at the plane of focus ...


12

The Redmi 6A uses the Sony Exmor IMX486 sensor, which is a 1/2.9" format sensor. Note that "1/2.9 inch" is merely a name, not its diagonal dimension (see: Why is a 1" sensor actually 13.2 × 8.8mm?). The IMX486 has a 5.04 mm × 3.77 mm sensor, corresponding to a crop factor of about 6.9×. The camera's focal length is about 3.8 mm (...


11

You can often use techniques from piloting. You can find alignments in the picture, for instance the corner of a building that masks off the 2nd vertical line of windows of the building in the back. From this you determine a line on which the camera must have been. With two more such alignments you get three lines that give you a triangle in which the camera ...


7

There is a distance limit. It depends on the baseline, the focal length and the pixel pitch. Disparity Maps The depth information is calculated by comparing two feature points in the two images. The difference in point position is called disparity. In rectified, parallel stereo cameras you end up with a disparity map. This contains all the information for ...


7

I am not knowledgeable on the math and programming needed for this, but I can provide you with some insights into information needed for something such. What you want to look into, is perspective distortion in photography. In particular, you need to research lens compression (which is a bogus term, but that aside). A quick overview of perspective ...


5

Stereoscopic photography is the art of taking two photos of the same thing from a vantage point approximately 9-10cm apart from each other so as to mimic the distance between the human eyes. They are then viewed in such a way as to combine the two images. Much more than I can write here can be gleaned from the wikipedia entry here though I'm not sure if ...


5

are 3d cameras same as stereo camera's? Stereo cameras are a type of 3D camera. There are other types of 3D cameras. my understanding of stereo camera is that, there will be two lenses, where one of it is used for depth sensing. Not really. It's more like both lenses are used together at the same time for depth sensing via triangulation. very ...


5

Any interchangeable lens camera will do. Invest in: Lighting (for things that are physically textured, side vs head-on lighting makes a world of difference). You want to be as flexible as possible regarding color and position of lights. A macro lens. A secondhand, adapted, older, manual focus macro lens of 50 or 60 mm (made eg by Minolta, Nikon, Leitz, ...


4

It depends on the effect you want. If you want a natural view, the separation between the images should be about 6.5 cm/2.5 inches, equal to the distance between the average person's eyes. However, if you do this, the stereo effect is limited to relatively nearby objects (6.5 m/20 feet), and objects that are too close will give a "double vision" effect ...


4

Is it possible to calculate the distance of an object to the camera with two pictures which are taken a few cm apart? It depends. You'd need to know something more than just having the two photos. Examples of helpful information include information about the camera and lens such as the sensor size and focal length, and also exactly how the camera's position ...


4

OK, after a LOT of googling I finally have an answer: First of all, I downloaded the facebook template for 360 degree photos, and added the (equirectangular!) spherical photo onto it, and 'saved as' jpg. Here's the Facebook template. Don't know if it's actually needed, but then you at least have the right metadata, I imagine. Could be wrong though. If you ...


3

how would you represent an image with a 60° span without just leaving most of it black? You can't do it without leaving most of it black. With a 60ºx60º image, you've only covered 1/18th of the 360ºx180º view, after all. Cardboard, being first and foremost a VR viewer, requires equirectangular input to represent the entire VR environment, so whether or ...


3

If you are doing much of this sort of work I would seriously suggest investing the time to learn Blender 3D - it will not cost you more than time and the sweat on your brow as it is completely free, (both without cost and Open Source), to get and to use for any purpose. It is cross platform but obviously needs a reasonable amount of storage and processing ...


3

The effect is called wiggle stereoscopy or wiggle 3D. The image produced is wiggle stereogram. It is produced by taking the two images of the same subject/scene, from a slightly different viewpoint (say, 2-6 inches apart). Instead of projecting those images to different eyes to produce "normal" 3D images (e.g., like a ViewMaster), the images are looped in ...


3

When do straight lines become curved when talking about projection? When you decide what type of projection you wish to use. A rectilinear projection will preserve straight lines (but not correct angles between straight lines) at the expense of the relative sizes of objects in the center of the frame versus the edge of the frame. Things near the edge will ...


3

Stereo still photography was popular near the turn of the last century. Two images were taken; one mimics a right eye view and the other a left eye view. The difference in these two views is call “parallax”. The fact that people with normal vision, morph double eyed vision into a single minds-eye image is the core of our ability to see depth (3D). 3D ...


3

One of the main purposes of lightboxes is to minimize texture by placing dispersed light from almost every angle on the subject. If you want to show textures, you need to use more directional lighting at a fairly steep angle, compared to the axis of the lens, to created stronger shadows. Shadows are what shows the texture of 3D objects in a 2D photograph.


3

According to Know Your Meme: Wigglegrams (also known as stereographs) are animated images that simulate 3D effect by looping two or three frames of an object shot from the vantage points of the viewer’s right and left eyes. Similar to cinemagraphs, each instance usually consists of a few continuous frames that play in loop.


3

With just two images (stereoscopy), it's called Wiggle Stereoscopy (stereo meaning two). For the general case (two or more), the general term is just Wiggle 3-D From that wiki page: Wiggle stereoscopy is an example of stereoscopy in which left and right images of a stereogram are animated. This technique is also called wiggle 3-D or wobble 3-D, ...


3

If it doesn't have to be a smooth continuous transition from one view to the next, and if you can write HTML and JS, you can do all the work in the web page. Calibrate the turntable with degree markings around it (e.g. every 15° for 30 positions). Mount the camera securely and use a remote shutter. Take a photo in each position. In the web page, write JS ...


2

There are telescopes that can take stereoscopic pictures of celestial bodies several light years away, so there really isn't a distance limit :-). Granted, they do it from opposite ends of the earths orbit (as noted in the comments), so they are quite far apart. That being said, there is a practical limit, and it's is mostly based on the difference in ...


2

As Matt's answer says, this is something typically associated with Zeiss lenses that gets argued about on fredmiranda's alt-gear forum a lot. The theory goes that lenses that exhibit a high degree of "micro-contrast", so that the transition from in focus to out of focus tends to be a little more defined give "the pop" more than lenses that exhibit a high ...


2

If you want the scenes to look natural: the distance should be the same as between your eyes - about 8cm. This is independent of the subject distance. If you use a larger separation, you're effectively simulating the perspective of a giant; I remember seeing an early 3D IMAX movie where they shot a scene with a 2m distance between the cameras, overlooking a ...


2

Yes you can. The technique you use depends on 2 things. If you need a high resolution option or you want a realtime one. For the high resolution option you can take a series of shoots rotating the camera and after that stilching it on a special program. You can use Hugin that its free. You need some technique to do this. Here are some notes I did sometime ...


2

There are transformations that you can apply to achieve some of what you're after, but there's not enough information in the source photo to come up with the final photo. For example, look at the heads of the two bolts. In the final photo, you can see that they're hexagonal, with round washers. But in the source photo you're looking at them from the side, so ...


2

There are numerous products available which do this exact thing. They are adapters which often fit over an existing lens to produce 2 images on the sensor. A quick search on 3d lens will give you the most hits though it isn't something I'd consider an obvious search term. Products I'm aware of include ranges from Loreo and Kula 3d. There is/was a 3d lens ...


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