21

There are actually two common types of "little planet" images: polar and stereographic. The example image here is polar, the Flickr group images are both, and the one asked about in the linked "duplicate" post, How to do 360 polar pano in photography? is a stereographic "little sky". They have different requirements and techniques, but both typically begin ...


16

I can't settle for an alternative that's not vertically 360 degrees (or at least much more than 180 degrees). A camera that shoots in every possible direction is said to have a field of view of 360 (horizontal) x 180 (vertical) degrees. Having more than that means you will be capturing some or all of the scene twice. Consider an imaginary arc that spans 180 ...


15

Using Hugin Yes, since Google PhotoSphere panos are stored as equirectangular projections you can use Hugin to remap to other projections. Go into the View → Advanced (or Expert) mode. Click the Add Images... button to load the stitched panorama. Set the Lens type to Equirectangular and the HFOV to 360. This will load your 360x180 as a 360x180. ...


11

A good overview of the techniques for shooting this type of 360x180/equirectangular/VR panorama can be found on Eric Rougier's fromparis website. The basic process is to shoot enough images to cover the entire sphere, and then stitch them together as a panorama. Mappings Those "six shots" you're seeing are typically remapped cube faces from a full ...


10

Distance to the closest object Let's say the closest object from your lens is a chair at 50cm. The different shots will be very different regarding this chair. If the closest object is like 5m away the misalignment will be smaller. So you have to decide or prepare the scene or your point of view to minimize this defect. One option is to have this close ...


8

360x180 panos can be taken with a variety of gear, but they do get harder to take in certain situations. The first factor, obviously, is scene coverage. Either taking multiple shots or using multiple cameras simultaneously (as Google does), you have to cover the entire sphere. You can use specialized lenses to maximize the coverage per shot, or take more ...


7

It depends on the scene you're trying to shoot, how you're trying to shoot it, and what kind of 360 panorama you're making. Coverage and parallax are two separate things, so, no you can't "fix" parallax errors by shooting more coverage with more overlap. And yes, stitching programs can encounter alignment problems when parallax comes into play with nearby ...


7

It sounds like you need to show them, not just babble at them. It might also help to have them do this once in a controlled situation (your office, their office, the lunchroom, etc) with you watching, then have them do the stitching together of the panorama. Or maybe just watch you do it once. Either way, they get some appreciation for what it will be ...


6

You can try to add images into Hugin and calculate) coordinates of images (or move them in OpenGl preview by hand), six faces will differ Yaw (0,60,120,180,240,300), top and bottom will have Pitch +90 and -90 , and then you must figure right projection (switch objectives) and hfov to "fill the frame". Then you can render it. I have successfully used this ...


6

What on earth makes you think you're not still composing, even if you're shooting 360º? You can make a sizable difference in the images you take simply by choosing a different vantage point. Both remapped from 360ºx180º panoramas of the same subject (the Spreckels Organ Pavilion in Balboa Park), taken from two different vantage points, first one's from the ...


6

How are 360° photos stored? Do they have a special file format or are they projected onto a regular png/jpeg? 360x180 panos are stored a number of different ways, but most commonly as a single image in the usual visual file formats (TIFF, JPEG, PNG) in equirectangular projection. Equirectangular projection represents the sphere as a 2x1 rectangle, where the ...


5

And here comes another 360/180 product: RICOH THETA - spherical panoramic photos, short videos, wi-fi control


5

The Google Streetview images are taken with multiple cameras, simultaneously, and then stitched together as a panoramic. They talk all about it here, Street View. If you wanted to get a similar picture from a stationary location, it can be done with a single digital camera (point and shoot or DSLR) taking multiple pictures. When taking panoramic photos, ...


5

ImageMagick can't do this—it doesn't do projection remapping. But there are a number of other tools that do. I'm pretty sure that Hugin or panoramas tools scripting or Gimp and Mathmap could get you there, but I'm lazy so I paid for a license for a commercial application called Pano2VR. Pano2VR can remap equirectangulars to cube faces. Because the ...


5

What you're running into, in terms of the places where the photos don't join up seamlessly, could be one of two issues. It could be that you missed covering that part of the scene (blank screen; no data), and it could be that you created some parallax error by moving the camera in space, rather than rotating the camera's lens around its "no parallax point" (...


5

There are no finer details. Let us start from the beginning. A file You have a camera with a lens and the file stores what was projected on the sensor. You can change the lens, for example to a wide angle lens and the file just do the same. No black magic there. You can then store an image taken with a fisheye lens. The file itself has no idea and ...


4

Your lens should be marked as "Normal" in Hugin, and the focal length multiplier of your camera is 1.0. The auto-alignment in Hugin can be frustrating at times. I have found that the wider the field of view the more difficult it is for Hugin to align images. There are also a few different algorithms that you can choose to automatically select and align ...


4

Yes, there are a number of true 360 degree cameras that can do 1080 HD/30fps out on the market at the moment. With the advent of 360x180 content on Youtube and Facebook, there's been an explosion of 360 cameras (video and still) of late. Many of these are action cameras. Here are the cameras in the $350-$500 price range, that are listed in this June 2016 ...


4

Some links to tutorials help you get started: Digitial Camera world Photoshop tutorial Photo extremist tutorial Photojojo tutorial This is entirely a product of post processing and stitching multiple exposures together. Not the by-product of some interesting lens. You will need a tripod and the right software (photoshop/some other plugins assist (see ...


4

This is http://www.lewiswhyld.com/royal-baby-arrives/ GoPro rig, somewhat similar to the http://freedom360.us rig. Lewis is a photo journalist based in the UK, and his rig appears to be a one-off, where the F360 is actually in production.


4

Even if the person is still, you need to make sure you rotate your camera orotund the nodal point of the Lens. This is more critical as a subject gets close. To understand what the nodal point is close one eye and hold out one arm opwith a finger up. Now rotate your neck and see how the background changes relative to your finger. That parallax is because you ...


4

I have done something similar before (can't post the result because I don't have a model release). I only did it for non-360˚ but the technique will work for 360˚ as well. Essentially, do it the normal way and make sure your model is not at the loop-closure. Start one image left of the model/person. (Here is where you will match it with the end of your ...


4

To get a good spherical view, you have to cover the entire sphere. Your panorama doesn't have 360° coverage in yaw--you didn't shoot the whole circle all the way around. Having a panorama that's 2:1 isn't enough by itself to do this magic. The 2:1 aspect ratio is merely the outcome of a 360°x180° (full spherical view) panorama that's been ...


4

OK, after a LOT of googling I finally have an answer: First of all, I downloaded the facebook template for 360 degree photos, and added the (equirectangular!) spherical photo onto it, and 'saved as' jpg. Here's the Facebook template. Don't know if it's actually needed, but then you at least have the right metadata, I imagine. Could be wrong though. If you ...


4

What you're missing is a lot of scene coverage. To get a 360ºx180º full spherical view, you have to cover the entire sphere. Without a fisheye lens, this is likely to mean multiple rows as well as a zenith and nadir shot, with precise coverage. In hardware terms, this probably means you need a panohead on a tripod--or at least a plumbline--to make sure ...


4

You need to take your photography hat off for a bit and put your training hat on. You've been to school - you know what's needed to successfully teach someone something. They need to understand first the value of learning - why do they need this knowledge? What's in it for them? (WIFM) BTW - they need to trust that you're the right person for this as well....


4

As a professional technical writer, I tend to break things down into numbered step procedures, with as specific and unambiguous instructions as possible. However, whenever you think you've made something idiot-proof, they go and build a better idiot. Your biggest trip-ups will be assumptions you don't realize you've made. And if you're not a SME (subject ...


3

I found a couple of alternatives by searching google with 360 camera. http://www.360.tv/ http://www.bublcam.com/


3

The problem you are encountering is caused by the fact that the point of view is moving. In large, outdoor shots, the distance between you and the subject is far, thus, slight changes in the point of view don't matter relative to the distance to the subjects and the image looks fine. When you are in a confined space however, the difference in distance ...


3

I realized that GraphicsMagick offers a simple way to prepare images for Streetview. The software runs on a large number of operating systems. An alternative is ImageMagick. Tutorial based on Maps Javascript API V3 Example prerequisite Panorama image my_panorama.jpg, sized 18432×9216 px (360° horizontally, 180° vertically), stitched with ICE. Example ...


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