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1

TL;DR: The pictures already taken and the next picture might be at risk, but after that everything should be okay, only be careful when advancing the film. The film will most likely still be in the same position (the M35 seems to be a manual-wind camera without any motoric film advancing or rewinding), so you can continue from there. You can take photos ...


0

Just use it and find out. If it is not broken everything will be fine. If it is broken nothing will change. Using film always will involve some wasted rolls (and many wasted frames). If a wasted roll stops you, you will not shoot much film. The more you use a film camera, the fewer mistakes you are likely to have. It takes practice and experience. Equipment ...


3

The first easy diagnosis you can do is to put in a new roll of cheap film. Don't try to use this roll for shots you intend to keep – this is for diagnostic purposes only. See if the camera "acts" normally with the new roll: take pictures, advance the film as normally after each shot. If it seems like it takes more cranks on the advance lever until ...


8

If I have ISO 100 speed film in a camera and choose to expose for ISO 400 speed film, I'm underexposing by two stops. It is true that ISO 400 film is more sensitive (and thus brighter) than ISO 100 film. But when I change my camera's ISO setting to '400' I'm not actually changing the film's sensitivity to ISO 400 - I've still got ISO 100 film loaded! What I ...


-3

On cameras without dedicated exposure compensation controls, changing the ISO setting is the way exposure compensation is done in automatic exposure modes. It sounds like that is how you are using it. Since you are not shooting the whole roll with a single ISO setting it is obvious that you don’t have to use a single ISO for the roll. Technically what you ...


4

Others have explained why you should set the ISO on the camera properly to reflect the film used. However, note that there is a different control you can use after that: exposure compensation, often with a symbol that looks like a ± or a black and white gradient. On old mechanical systems you can see that they are actually on the same knob; the ISO setting ...


19

In addition to Saaru's good answer, I wanted to point out that the reason you might have been switching around the ISO setting and not really noticing much difference is because film has reasonably good exposure latitude, and images can be "recovered" with some success from underexposed and overexposed film. Probably the machines/operators at the ...


48

The ISO of a film roll indicates how sensitive that whole film roll is to light. That's a chemical property of the film roll, which you cannot change shot by shot. The ISO "setting" on your camera does not actually set the ISO of your film, as that is physically impossible. It does tell (the light meter of) the camera what the sensitivity is of the ...


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