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26

Well, it seems obvious that the film did not advance between shots. Whether that's because of user error (film not installed right so it didn't catch on the advancing mechanism) or a hardware issue with the advance mechanism not working properly can't really be determined without more information and/or inspection of the camera... Try taking a couple shots ...


20

Doing double exposures with the k1000 requires that you cock the shutter using the lever while simultaneously holding down the release on the camera bottom. This allows the shutter to cock while not advancing the film. Check to make sure that this release button isn’t sticking in.


20

My antique wooden Kodak™ day-light loader (ca. 1905) was made with a removable spool of thin (now quite brittle) perforated celluloid with raised rubber edges. The film was sandwiched between the layers of the roll. The celluloid strip was wide enough to accommodate all sizes from miniature to very wide 128 (2½" wide!). The roll of film was wound inside ...


14

The Nikon FG-20 has an electronic shutter, which will not work properly if no battery is inserted. You can, with limited capabilities, still use the camera without a battery. Light metereing will of course not work, but the shutter speeds are also restricted to B and a mechanically controlled 1/90s indicated as 'M90' on the speed dial. Unfortunately, the ...


11

You might look at the Wikipedia Photography Technology timeline. A few key points from that reference: 1909 – Kodak produces 35 mm motion picture film on an acetate (less flammable) base 1913 - Kodak introduces panchromatic film (approximating the color sensitivity of the eye - older emulsions were not very sensitive to red light). 1925 - These innovations ...


11

Usually, it does not affect or limit the aperture or shutter speed at all. Rather, it tells the exposure meter where the center is. In some ways, it's exactly like exposure compensation dials. If the camera has a program mode, it's essential information for getting exposure right. If it doesn't, like the Pentax K1000, it just shifts the exposure needle — if ...


10

One of the users on Photo.net is a chemical engineer who worked at Kodak for ~30 years. He posted the following information in a thread over there about Life expectancy for refrigerated film: In all cases where we are using film past its expiration date, the only safe approach is to try a roll OF EACH PRODUCT and evaluate it before shooting the rest ...


10

While I've never been to India, I've travelled in other countries of Southeast Asia. These are countries where you see vibrant colours everywhere. If it were I, I would shoot a reversal film because of the gorgeous results you get with such vibrant scenes. My preference is Fujifilm Provia, but many people rave about Velvia. If you can, try to shoot a test ...


10

It depends on the specific camera. The Pentax K1000, for example, only requires the battery for metering, but everything else is mechanical. On your camera, shutter timing is electronic and requires a battery — but according to the manual there is a special setting M90 which provides a 1/90th of a second shutter speed which is all mechanical and can be used ...


8

There are a couple of considerations here... When Kodak Vision3 500T is used for stills photography, very often it has been pre-treated to remove the RemJet anti-halation layer, to make it compatible with the standard C-41 process. This process effectively increases the sensitivity of the film to ISO 800. CineStill 800T is Vision3 500T with the RemJet layer ...


6

The function of an ISO setting completely depends on the camera: Fully manual, no meter camera (Early rangefinders/TLR's): May have had a dial or slot for you to store part of the film box as a reminder for you to remember what you loaded. Exposure calculation would be done with a handheld meter or would be assumed based on rules like Sunny-16. Cards were ...


5

The example photo appears to be the result of a malfunctioning shutter mechanism. It most likely need to be replaced. If your camera is not worth what a shutter replacement would cost, then it's time to consider a new (or different used) camera.


5

Like twalberg says, it seems obvious that the film did not advance between shots. Make sure the film advance mechanism is working properly. When you have no film loaded, open the back and check that both the film take-up spool and the sprocket teeth both turn at the same time when you work the film advance lever. The sprocket teeth should turn, even if ...


4

My condolences for how your photos came out. It is always disappointing to get film back and find it in such poor condition. You appear to have a camera issue with film advance, potential light leaks, and possibly an issue with subpar handling by the developer/printer which resulted in a failure align negatives correctly. If you look at the top photo, on ...


4

It looks to my eye like the negatives may have been significantly underexposed or underdeveloped. This resulted in negatives with very little density (they're almost transparent). Then when the negatives were scanned and reversed to give a positive image the lab applied a lot of gain to try and draw something out of the very dark images. Green tint is a ...


4

I think it's more likely these photos were taken with a film that was rated at a higher speed, shot at that speed, and "pushed" in the processing to compensate for the "underexposure." Film then was relatively slow. One of the very fastest film was rated at "ASA" 1200 (Royal Pan X, for example) and processed in a high-energy developer or in rare ...


4

Developing black and white 35mm film in the 1920s would have been similar to how it's done today. Here is what I found, along with links... It seems you've already done some research to determine that 35mm cameras, such as Leica A, were available in the 1920s. You can read a bit about 35mm film on Wikipedia (135 film; 35mm movie film). Note that preloaded ...


4

The emulsion side of Kodachrome was coated with a clear protective lacquer. Perhaps it has oxidized. Additionally, this coat may attract dust and such as it can gain an electrostatic charge. Lacquer is used to protect the Kodachrome emulsion. Lacquer is made from “guncotton”. Ordinary cotton is treated with nitric acid and solvents to make lacquer. As time ...


4

If the film advanced and you heard the shutter fire, there's a good chance you captured something. Based on info mattdm provides, the film may be under or over exposed, depending on whether photos were taken indoors or out, because of the fixed shutter speed. You can try using the camera while examining the shutter to see what happens. Consider taking the ...


4

Don't wash with water if you can avoid - use film cleaner available for cine film. Try Filmrenew - search web for supplier. Formaldehyde was removed from stabilizer years ago. It was replaced by a mix of common film wetting agents plus a mild fungicide. If you must wash, and can't find a modern stabilizer, just use PhotoFlow or equivalent. You are digitizing ...


4

Can I use 50mm f2 lens to take building photos? In my case will be an Yashica ML 50mm f/2. Yes. Yes you can.


3

Photos taken in... shutter priority... Overcast but bright day. You probably underexposed the image. Since digital images can be "corrected", you will need to examine the film density directly to determine exposure. Other possible issues: Did you check whether the shutter and meter in your "re-discovered" AE-1 are fully functional? Was the film expired? "...


3

Old Leica screw-mount cameras were designed to be used with longer leaders. You have two options: Reshape the leader with scissors or other cutting implement. You may make or purchase a leader template if desired. See YouTube: How to load 35mm film in to a Screw Mount Leica. Load the film without reshaping the leader. Make sure the film is fully seated so ...


3

I've encountered adapters that allow lenses with M42, T2, TX, and Adaptall mounts to be used on Minolta cameras with SR/MC/MD mounts. You can adapt some other mounts, such as DKL, via M42. The reason for so few adapters isn't technical, but limited market potential. No new cameras with SR-based mounts are being produced. Also, it usually makes more sense to ...


3

We did not worry about making comparisons between formats, as there was no dominant format size. We spoke about angle of view by citing the published degrees. As an example, a Rollieflex 120 film size with an 80mm focal length delivered a 60° angle of view. We were satisfied by that, however, in the jargon of photography, then and now, this quoted value is ...


3

Back then folks, for the most part, were not so obsessed with exactness and precision. Most of the time "wide angle", "normal", or "telephoto" was descriptive enough for most purposes. Before the 135 format rose to dominance, there was no real expectation of expressing angles of view in terms of millimeters of focal length.


3

Most of the frames you show look underexposed. But there are some that look like they might be okay. Can you explain in detail how you arrived at the camera settings you used? A properly functioning AE-1 on full auto shouldn't produce such underexposed negatives. Were you using Aperture priority with F22? Did you have it in manual mode and ignore the meter? ...


3

Seems like your shutter curtain is damaged or needs a CLA (Clean-Lubricate-Adjust) At faster shutter speeds part of the image gets blocked by the shutter curtain. The slower shutter speeds seem fine, which is illustrated by your indoor shots not having any dark areas. Getting shutters repaired is an expensive task and oftentimes it is a better option to ...


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