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5

Here is a quote from the Kodak publication 'Storage and Care of KODAK Photographic Materials': Once you have exposed your film, paper, or material, it is important to minimize changes in the latent (unprocessed) image. For consistent results, process the film, paper, or material promptly after exposure. This is particularly important with ...


3

In general, Color Negative film is designed to be overexposed. Most can handle 1 stop over with no perceptible difference and things can look just fine up to +3 or +4 depending on the film. However, they can also start looking like garbage at as little as -1 under. This is why people say that it "likes to be shot at 200" - doing so forces you to be at ...


3

Well, first up, any film that is not in the can already is now junk. Film is sensitive to light, after all, and we measure exposures in fractions of a second during the day. Cracking the back to see what's going on cannot be done fast enough to not overexpose to oblivion. Any frames that were successfully rewound back into the can will be okay and can be ...


2

There are three likely causes of this kind of mark on the film. First, bromide drag from insufficient agitation. Second, surge marks from excessive agitation. Neither one is very likely for film developed by a commercial lab, though they're certainly a possibility. The third possibility is a light leak -- not in the camera, but in the cassette, ...


2

Possible dumb question: because pushing takes place during development, is it impossible for the negatives to be pushed? Push processing must occur during development. Once film has been developed the process is irreversible. You can't go back, un-develop it and develop it again. Once you have a negative, processing is locked in and you can't push it. ...


2

Latent image shifting is not much of a problem provided we are not talking about several months. After exposure, rapid latent image shifting occurs in the first 48 hours and continues at a reduced pace until processed. To mitigate, place film in an air-tight container and place in the freezing compartment of your refrigerator. When ready to process, remove ...


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