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Canon Inc. is a prominent manufacturer of cameras and lenses including EOS DSLRs and PowerShot compact cameras.

2
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A banded image like this is caused by the file being corrupted. This can be caused by a couple of things: Incomplete copying - did you safely eject the SD card when you removed it from your computer …
answered Apr 29 '17 by Harry Harrison
-1
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Image Camera Mac is doing something to the images, try using Finder to copy the files there and back, and see if you have the same problem. If Image Camera Mac has the option to copy the pictures wit …
answered Mar 6 '18 by Harry Harrison
3
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AF systems are not perfect, with such a shallow DOF it's not uncommon to see slight misfocus. Even if the AF system is perfect, humans aren't, both you and the subject may move slightly while taking …
answered May 21 '17 by Harry Harrison
1
vote
This camera has no rotating screen, so you cannot see the photo while taking it. You'll have to use common sense and guesswork to figure out which way to point it. Hold it out at arms length, with th …
answered Sep 27 '17 by Harry Harrison
0
votes
Edit: see comments These look like "hot" or dead pixels. It's quite common for sensors to develop a small number broken photosites during their lifetime - these will commonly show up as single pixels …
answered Aug 28 '16 by Harry Harrison
1
vote
On moving targets, using a half press to autofocus is likely to cause the out-of-focus effect, as it increases the delay between focusing and the shutter activation. On most cameras, just pushing the …
answered Mar 21 '16 by Harry Harrison
2
votes
The time lapse flicker you have experienced is commonly an effect of aperture variation rather than shutter speed. For each individual shot the camera moves the aperture blades into the right positi …
answered May 18 '17 by Harry Harrison