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I've just bought this camera and the lens, and I feel so silly; I don't know how to zoom. Do you know how? When I turn it on it seems to be zoomed and I would like to zoom out.

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You can’t. The 50mm f/1.4 is a prime lens, which means it has a fixed focal length, or fixed field of view. This is what some people call a “sneaker zoom” lens, where you as the photographer have to physically move to change what you see in the viewfinder. See mattdm’s great response in this question.

  • Thank You. what about with the camera, is there any build-in digital/optical zoom? – Tommaso Bendinelli Jul 5 '18 at 17:01
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    No, there is not. You can crop after you take the photo, though – NoahL Jul 5 '18 at 17:03
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    @TommasoBendinelli, I think it's better starting out in photography with a fixed focal length lens like this. It makes you think more about composition. It's a nice lens anyway, so I hope the answers don't make you feel like you've made the wrong choice :) – laurencemadill Jul 6 '18 at 11:17
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    @TommasoBendinelli, before you buy something make sure that you understand the difference between Canon EF and EF-S lenses. – Carsten S Jul 6 '18 at 19:25
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    @TommasoBendinelli Since you are shooting with an APS-C 77D, you might also consider the EF-S 17-55mm f/2.8 IS. That would give you what most people consider a more usable range with a cropped sensor camera. The angles of view possible with a 17-55mm lens on an APS-C body are about equivalent to a 27-88mm lens on a full frame camera. It's a quality lens that costs a little less than the EF 24-70mm f/4 L IS, which gives an equivalent 38-112 AoV on your camera. The 17-55/2.8 would give you one stop wider aperture in low light or for blurring backgrounds than the 24-70/4 would. – Michael C Jul 6 '18 at 21:12
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How to zoom with Canon 77D with Canon 50mm 1.4 lens

enter image description here

  • To zoom in, step forward.
  • To zoom out, step back.

It's often called zooming with your feet.

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