0

I have a copy of an Italian monochrome print (1920s) showing 4 youths playing cards with a cheat occurring by the passing of a card under the table by foot. How can I determine the origin of the original print?

  • 3
    what else do you know about it? How/When did you acquire it? As it is, you are banking on a very long shot that someone somehow recognises it. What about uploading the image here? Do a reverse image search? If it wasn't a publicly-available print, then I've no idea how you think anyone can possibly help trace its origins. – osullic Jun 26 '18 at 19:03
  • What do you mean by origin? Who photographed it? Where it was? Location? – Hueco Jun 26 '18 at 20:23
  • 3
    It is very hard to do an image search without an image. You wind up with this or this. – Michael C Jun 26 '18 at 22:02
  • note that bob isn't asking us to identify the picture, but how he should go about identifying it himself. as such, including the picture here seems unnecessary (unless that's the answer). – ths Jun 27 '18 at 8:44
2

Are you thinking of capodimonte porcelain figurines, such as this one, based on a sculpture by Italian Bruno Merli?

enter image description here

The only thing I can find that comes remotely close as a monochrome photo is this picture of Prince Leopold, (1853 - 1884), (second from left), the youngest son of Queen Victoria, playing cards at Oxford. He was created Duke of Albany in 1881. His companions are Dalyrimple (left), W. J. D. Campbell (standing), and Lord Brooke (right).

enter image description here

0

I would take a photo of the print, crop it accurately (to avoid removing or leaving too much of the margin), and "search by image" to find similar photo in Google and Bing.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.