4

enter image description here

Like there's an alien color cast on hands, face and hair?

The source photo didn't have those artifacts.

enter image description here

So, how can I fix this?

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    Because he is slowly disappearing and that will wreak havoc on your complexion. – Alaska Man May 4 '18 at 4:11
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The skin is exactly the same in both images. It's your perception of the skin that is different based on the surrounding colors.

Our eyes and brain have a remarkable ability to adapt to different lighting conditions. But when the surrounding conditions change our brains expect the things within those conditions to change as well. In this case, the background colors changed drastically, but the skin tones did not change as our brains would expect.

If your model had really been in the middle of the green environment, some of that green would have been reflected onto the model and he would have also reflected it to the camera. As it is, the blue that reflected off the shirt in the first photo is still showing on the skin in the second. So the background has one color of light (green tint reflected by the vegetation) illuminating it and the skin has a different color of light (blue reflected by the t-shirt) illuminating it.

One of the hardest things to do when compositing images is to make sure both parts are being lit by the same type of light so that we don't get mismatches like this.

That's just one reason why proper color management must take into account the ambient lighting conditions under which images are to be viewed. It affects the way our brains perceive color.

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    Agreed. He can prove it by subtracting photo #2 from photo #1, if that results in a colored rectangle with a black silhouette then it is equal. Note how the legs and right arm appear better. -- As for the technique he ought to have opened up the tolerance on the blue slightly (to avoid the ghost shirt effect) and use 'edge feathering' to reduce the jaggies on the outline and knock out the flyaways. Of course it also depends upon the software being used and it's capabilities. Simply droppering the shirt as a Blue/Green Screen color will leave something to be desired from the results. – Rob May 3 '18 at 13:20
  • @Rob, sorry i don't understand your phrases "As for the technique he ought to have opened up the tolerance on the blue slightly (to avoid the ghost shirt effect)" and "Simply droppering the shirt as a Blue/Green Screen color will leave something to be desired from the results' – user152435 May 3 '18 at 17:16
  • @user152435 - Which Software did you use? - What I said means "The shirt isn't 100% transparent in the first photo, allowing a wider range of blue shades will make the shirt disappear, along with the speckles on the neck and the effect of the reflection". – Rob May 3 '18 at 17:25
  • Ps CC 2014 So I need to avoid it from disappearing? And how to fix the speckles on the neck and the effect of reflection (I think you referred to those blue lines on arm)? – user152435 May 3 '18 at 17:57

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