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I purchased 2 rolls of Agfacolor 80s on ebay which have been expired since 1983.

I am curious whether this film needs to be processed in Kodak's C-41/Agfa's AP70 or in the Agfacolor process known as AP41.

According some research Agfa switched pretty late to C41, but I never found an explicit date when they did.

So I am unsure whether I can process it in C41 or if I have to process it in B&W chemistry, because AP41 isn't available anymore.

Edit: Agfa AP41 was the reversal processing name, Ektachromes competition, I dont remember the negative processing name for the old agfacolor

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2 Answers 2

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This page gives the process for the Agfa 80s film, and states that the process is the one used for the (older) Agfa CN-S films. No particular name or code for this process is given, but "Agfacolor N series chemicals" is mentioned.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ That page mentions that the film was available in 110, and pretty much all color film in that size was C-41. \$\endgroup\$
    – Blrfl
    Commented Apr 1, 2018 at 11:16
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Blrfl No the page mentions "A professional version of CN S-2 became available in 1975, in 35mm, 120 roll film and various sheet film sizes. The film went by the name of “Agfacolor 80S Professional” - the film I'm looking for. So sadly no c41. \$\endgroup\$
    – Canonip
    Commented Apr 2, 2018 at 6:11
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Canonip This source says they switched to C-41 in 1978. OP's roll is dated 1983. \$\endgroup\$
    – Blrfl
    Commented Apr 2, 2018 at 11:45
  • \$\begingroup\$ The Film is definitely Not c41, that is also what my lab said. But I found out, that you can process them for 10 minutes in cold (20°C) C41 chemistry. You will get severe color shifts, but a usable image \$\endgroup\$
    – Canonip
    Commented Apr 12, 2018 at 19:27
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Could be the end of the line for Agfa chemicals, as they were switching to Kodak E6/C41 for almost all their developing, but the professional film in silver boxes still used their chemistry for a while. What does the box look like?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Hi Nicholas, welcome to the site. Always good to have new contributors, especially with info on archival processes. Be aware that there's a distrinction between answers and comments—what you've posted here probably belongs as a comment—though I think maybe you don't have enough reputation yet to post comments. You can earn reputation by posting answers (or questions) and receiving upvotes from others. Also worth bearing in mind that this is a 6-year-old question from an inactive user—unlikely, I think, they'll return to answer your question at this stage \$\endgroup\$
    – osullic
    Commented Apr 29 at 9:46
  • \$\begingroup\$ As mentioned in the other comment, this does not seem to answer the question - please follow the site guidelines as listed in the other comment. \$\endgroup\$
    – Chait
    Commented May 1 at 17:54

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