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Here is what I am using:

Camera: Mamiya 645AF
Film: Fuji FP-100C Polaroids
Polaroid Back: 645AF Polaroid Land Pack Film Holder HP402

And the image below is how they turn out. See the image is so tiny, there is a lot more room left in the polaroid.

Why is that? And What should I have to give me an image that is larger while still using this Mamiya 645?

Thanks.

enter image description here

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3 Answers 3

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What should I have to give me an image that is larger while still using this Mamiya 645?

You can't do it with your Mamiya 645. The 645 name comes from the untrimmed size of the film format: 6 x 4.5 centimeters (60 x 45 mm or 2.36 x 1.77 inches). The actual imaging area is 56 x 41.5 mm. That's the size of the area of your larger Polaroid film that was exposed.

To do what you want you need to use larger format camera that uses a projected image as large as the polaroid film you are using. There were a few film sizes (107, 108, 118, 119) that used such a format the same size as Polaroid later chose, but they were all discontinued by the mid-1960s.

The imaging area of your polaroid film measures 82.5 x 101.5 mm (3.25 x 4.25 inches). The imaging area for your 645 camera using 120 format film measures 56 x 41.5 mm (roughly 2.2 x 1.65 inches). That's why you're only filling one-quarter of the Polaroid film size.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Got it, I now ordered a Polaroid Land Camera 250 ( the ones that have bellows ) .... that one will fill the whole size of the film right? \$\endgroup\$
    – Brandon
    Mar 14, 2018 at 13:24
  • \$\begingroup\$ Do you think if I scan that polaroid, would it be acceptable for an instagram /facebook styled size of photos ? or it is still too small to give me good detail \$\endgroup\$
    – Brandon
    Mar 14, 2018 at 13:27
  • \$\begingroup\$ That all depends on the scanner and how you use it. \$\endgroup\$
    – Michael C
    Mar 14, 2018 at 14:36
  • \$\begingroup\$ Thanks, yes I just ordered an Epson V-600 , going to scan them with that and see if it is good enough for Instagram for now. \$\endgroup\$
    – Brandon
    Mar 15, 2018 at 14:20
  • \$\begingroup\$ You should absolutely be able to get way more detail than needed for social media sharing from a decent scan of a medium-format polaroid. \$\endgroup\$
    – mattdm
    Mar 16, 2018 at 17:07
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The Mamiya 645 is incapable of producing images bigger than 645 format allows (nominally 6x4.5 cm, actually 56 × 41.5 mm). This is the size of the little opening in your Mamiya Polaroid back.

A question remains: what use is then the Polaroid back, when it produces such tiny images (they are not much smaller than wildly successful Instax Mini, at 62 × 46 mm, but let that rest)?

And the answer to this is that in the days of yore the Polaroids were not used as an end product, but as a sort of "live view" - a final check of the composition and lighting before a shot was taken on film.

For this purpose Polaroid backs were produced for all major camera makes using common 4 × 5" size Polaroid film, most of which was wasted.

To make use of entire Polaroid film you would need a proper 4 × 5" camera and a relevant back.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Got it, I now ordered a Polaroid Land Camera ( the ones that have bellows ) .... that one will fill the whole size of the film right? \$\endgroup\$
    – Brandon
    Mar 14, 2018 at 13:24
  • \$\begingroup\$ Well the thing is that Mamiya has a f/2.8 lens ! so imagine shallow depth of field on a polaroid ... but the Polaroid Land Camera 250 that I just ordered is f/8.8 .... so I was looking for ways to get shallow depth of field but on polaroid \$\endgroup\$
    – Brandon
    Mar 14, 2018 at 13:25
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    \$\begingroup\$ @Brandon remember crop factor! The f/8.8 lens is for much bigger format that the f/2.8 - and btw a 80/1.9 lens was produced for the 645, making it the fastest medium format lens, unless my eyes are cheated by some spell. \$\endgroup\$ Mar 14, 2018 at 15:25
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    \$\begingroup\$ 114mm f/8.8 with a crop factor of 0.33X is the 35mm equivalent of 38mm f/2.9 when the 35mm is printed at 4.25x3.25 inches to match the polaroid. \$\endgroup\$
    – Michael C
    Mar 14, 2018 at 15:40
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The Polaroid film back puts the Polaroid onto the existing film plane, which has a projected image size designed for 120 film. There's no changing that (that I'm aware of)

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  • \$\begingroup\$ 120 film can actually be used in several different format sizes, depending on the camera used. The maximum height across the film of the imaging area is 56mm (since the film feeds vertically in the 645 that is the width of the image), but the other dimension can be anywhere from 45mm (645 or 6 x 4.5 cm) to 6x6, 6x7, 6x8, 6x9, 6x12, 6x17, and 6x24. The number of exposures yielded by a standard 30-33 inch long roll varies from 15-16 for 645 to only 3 for 6x24. \$\endgroup\$
    – Michael C
    Mar 14, 2018 at 6:12
  • \$\begingroup\$ @MichaelClark - indeed. I'm glad others stepped up to answer the gritty details. I saw Brandon's Q and wanted to answer it in the space of the one train stop I had left. I'd edit this info into my answer, but see you've already supplied it. Cheers, \$\endgroup\$
    – OnBreak.
    Mar 14, 2018 at 16:11

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