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I'm being commissioned to photograph 10 animals for a breeder of reptiles and I am in the process of making the license.

Most license templates I see, include either clear descriptions/titles(what does that mean?) of the image or have an attachment of the printed files themselves.

So to my understanding I explain that at first, my creative fees are paid to commission the shoot, then after will the licensing fees be paid. Is this correct information?

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"Is it possible to grant the license of photos before the commissioned shoot"?

Absolutely it is possible and it is best practice ( in your best interest ) to have an agreement or contract in place before any work is done.

"licensing fees" What kind of licensing are you talking about. Is it a one time usage, one year or five year usage, unlimited usage?

Is it exclusive rights or do you want to retain the right to use the photos for your portfolio or to sell or list with a stock agency? There is no answer to " Is this correct information? "

Of course you can attempt to do it later but it is in your best interest to avoid any misunderstandings by having a clear understanding of what the client expects. What if you do the shoot and then you can not come to an agreement on the licensing? You are out time and money unless you get them to sign an agreement that states they will pay your creative fee regardless of whether or not you can agree to a licensing contract. They would be foolish to do that. Why make things difficult, just ask them what licensing they need and work it out.

Every photographer has there own business practices and it can vary from client to client or even from job to job with the same client. licensing photos you have already taken is different than licensing photos you have been commissioned to take.

It up to you to come to an agreement with the client and since they are commissioning you I am sure they will have specific needs or usage requirements.

My advise: What does the client want is the first question you need to know in order to create a contract. They may assume that since they are commissioning you to take photos for them that they will be the owners of the photos since they paid for them. What are their expectations/needs. They may be surprised to learn that the photographer would only offer them limited usage or charge them extra to license the photos they paid for.

All of this needs to worked out and agreed to BEFORE you shoot.

  • I believe you need to re-read the question I'm afraid. There is a provided reason for asking when the license fees should be worked out. – Chai Mar 10 '18 at 22:20
  • @chai I do not see the "provided reason for asking". Can you clarify please. Perhaps it is this sentence "So to my understanding I explain that at first, my creative fees are paid to commission the shoot, then after will the licensing fees be paid. Is this correct information?" but i do not understand what this sentence means. Also, do you expect to find a template that fits your requirements exactly? Why not Make a specific contract to address you and your clients needs. – Alaska Man Mar 10 '18 at 22:42
  • Yes it is that sentence. Where in I'm stating the separation of the photography fee vs the licensing fee. And then wondering if the licensing can be done later. Most certainly not but I am not a lawyer and i'd prefer a contract I can rely on. – Chai Mar 10 '18 at 23:06
  • Of coarse you can attempt to do it later but it is in your best interest to avoid any misunderstandings by having a clear understanding of what the client expects. My answer explains that. What if you do the shoot and then you can not come to an agreement on the licensing? you are out time and money unless you get them to sign an agreement that states they will pay your creative fee regardless of whether or not you can agree to a licensing contract and they would be foolish to do that. Why make things difficult, just ask them what licensing they need and work it out. – Alaska Man Mar 10 '18 at 23:28
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    @Chai "my client wants to use 2-3 images in his theme and will need a unlimited license for that" This pertinent information that you did not include and should be included if you want an informed answer. We can not know you are pregnant unless you tell us. – Alaska Man Mar 11 '18 at 19:12

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