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I used a Canon 6D before which geo-tagged my photos, but switched to a 5D mk III for a while which does not have a built-in GPS. I miss this information a lot. Canon external GPS is expensive and clumsy.

Is there an app for smart phones, which records your GPS track during the day you take photos, and then a software which loads the coordinates into the pictures' geotag exif info from the GPS tracks, based on the timestamp?

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An option is if you bring your Canon 6d but leave it in the bag, it has the feature to track the GPS location in a log file and you can rely on the log file to update your Canon 5Diii photos. I believe the Canon software that comes with the Canon Cameras can complete this. I know the 7Dii has the feature of just tracking the GPS location in a log file for my Canon T4i, I some times use.

Another option I saw years ago on you tube is download a cell phone app to track your GPS locations and use 3rd party software to update your GPS location on your files. The video I saw this done in is linked below.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dp1KCkItmf4

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I'm against the suggestion by @thebtm because I would rather save the battery on the camera and use the smartphone.

I have used the android app OSMAnd to record GPS traces. Its as good as your phone GPS allows, and you can set the record interval to be longer or shorter to to prioritise battery life or accuracy. The free version of the app will do what you need.

I can't recall what software I used to automatically match exif times to GPS times and Geo tag the images, sorry about that.

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There are indeed several android apps that can use the phone's GPS to record a track. And probably several ways to use those recorded tracks to mark your photos depending on what OS you use (I use Digikam with Marble on Linux)

Two things to keep an eye on, though:

Make sure the format in which you record the track can be used by the program you use to mark your photos.

Make sure you have the correct time on your camera, or better, take a picture of the GPS tracker screen with the timestamp readable, and use that to measure the difference between the two clocks. The GPS clock is much more accurate than your camera clock... The method I use: one photo at the end of the tracking to record the GPS time at that moment, then use the time recorded in the exif to measure the difference, and use that in the marking application (Digikam/Marble in my case)

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Check out exiftool

Currently supported GPS track log file formats:

  • GPX
  • NMEA (RMC, GGA, GLL and GSA sentences)
  • KML
  • IGC (glider format)
  • Garmin XML and TCX
  • Magellan eXplorist PMGNTRK
  • Honeywell PTNTHPR (see Orientation)
  • Bramor gEO log
  • Winplus Beacon .TXT

Exiftool is a free, command line tool available on major platforms (it's based on Perl).
It has a bit of a learning curve but once you get it, write down the procedure for next time. I have used it to organize my photos (rename and move them based on the EXIF date) but haven't tried the GPS functionality (yet).

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