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enter image description hereI have to take pictures of mirror frames for my job. Some of these are very shiny, reflective frames. I cant get the lighting to look right. Part of the frame has bright spots of light on it, the rest of the frame is dark and fuzzy. I would appreciate any help.

  • Are you sure you want to eliminate the variation? It's fairly common for shiny things to be photographed while reflecting both light and dark areas, since this is a big part of what tells our brains that it is, in fact, shiny. – junkyardsparkle Jan 26 '18 at 21:55
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Is your job, being a photographer?

If you want good pictures, you need to know the job of a photographer. In this case basically controlling the illumination, the ambient reflections.

On a glossy material, you do not take the photo of the object... You take the photo of all surroundings reflected on the object. So you need to control all the surroundings.

For this use softboxes, white foamboard, black banners, etc.

But it is a matter of style and aesthetics. There is no formula. There is a chance you do NOT want to eliminate that contrast but control it.

A glossy material without this contrast looks flat.

If you are not a photographer, and your company cares about the quality of the images, hire a photographer.

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The way I know is to use polarising filters AND polarised light source. You can check this discussion

A polarizer (circular or otherwise) won't help with reflections from metal -- it has no effect. It can only reduce reflections from non-metallic surfaces (such as your wood floors) Paul

Also you can try to soften a lot the light with some curtains or use huge diffuser

  • I have never used a diffuser. Do I put the light source(s) behind it? – Cory Jan 26 '18 at 15:30
  • @Cory: yes, you can put the diffuser (e.g. a softbox) between your light and you subject. Or you could point your flash on a reflective, diffusive surface (i.e. not a mirror but reflective foil or a white wall) and use that reflection as your main light. That also diffuses your light source. – Saaru Lindestøkke Jan 26 '18 at 15:38
  • Great. Very helpful – Cory Jan 26 '18 at 17:21

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