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When using my Panasonic DMC-FZ2000 with the lens at its widest focal length (24mm), I can see the lens hood on the top and the bottom of the picture when shooting in RAW. However, it is not visible at all when using JPEG. The problem goes away when I remove the lens hood, so it's not a simple vignetting issue. There is noticeable barrel distortion on the RAW image.

Can anyone explain this behavior?

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    please post an example images – aaaaaa Jan 10 '18 at 16:38
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Your camera is almost certainly applying lens correction for geometric distortion to the JPEG images. This results in the edges of the widest angle images being cropped slightly to correct the barrel distortion most zoom lenses demonstrate at the wide end. The 8.8-175mm (24-480mm FF equivalent) wide focal length ratio zoom lens of your Panasonic FZ2000 almost certainly demonstrates barrel distortion at the shortest focal lengths.

  • That's too strange! If it's not particularly the case with the OPs camera or hood then this is huge failure in design. That's weird for this brand. – user174174 Jan 10 '18 at 19:53
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    @user174174 Not really. The hood is designed to fit the field of view of the lens at its widest with lens correction applied. Most such cameras only output in jpeg. When the ability to output in raw was added I guess it was either assumed anyone working in raw was going to do lens correction or it was an oversight. – Michael C Jan 10 '18 at 22:51
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    I think that the feature is a deliberate design decision. Most of the time, the users expect result image be rectangular shape with no distortion. You see that covered part of the picture only because of the distortion. Lens hood struggles for every milimeter for best protection. So why not cover something you throw away most of the time anyway? – Thinkeye Jan 11 '18 at 9:09

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