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I am used to Adobe Lightroom where you can use an "auto adjust" button to get a automated optimized output of a RAW photo.

I use Darktable now and am looking for something similar. I want to edit my vacation pictures and don't want to spend a long time on each photo and am looking for a quick optimization for a large number of photos.

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In Darktable, styles will allow a saved set of edits. A style can be applied to multiple images in the Lighttable using the Styles module. Individual Darkroom modules may have presets. Presets can be applied automatically to images based on combinations of camera, lens, ISO, and a few other similar parameters.

An easy way to create a style is to edit an image in the Darkroom to the appearance you want and then select the styles icon from the history stack module. Styles can also be created using the Styles module on the Lighttable.

On the Lighttable it is also possible to copy and part or all of one image's history stack to other images using the History Stack module. Sometimes this is easier than creating a style, sometimes it isn't.

It is also possible to export images using a particular sidecar (xmp) file from the command line using the sytnax

  $>darktable-cli <input> <xmp> <output>

using Darktable's command line interface.

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Then simply use the JPEGs generated by the camera. On some cameras you can do this afterwards too with only the RAWs.

Darktable does not have a a functionality to optimize all settings. Some modules have an option to automate the adjustment, like the exposure module.

You can also create a style (a set of module settings) to multiple pictures.

See the manual for more information on styles: https://www.darktable.org/usermanual/ch02s03s08.html.php

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Just add a style preset with:

  • exposure: auto
  • white balance: camera (or spot - whole image)
  • sharpen: defaults
  • base curve: defaults

With that my severely underexposed pictures will look nice out of the box. (I always use my native ISO 200, and will rather use Darktable to make them light than to do it destructively using ISO in-camera).

This is basically what the other answers said without saying it. It works.

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