1

I am looking at a late-model Olympus digital camera and my curiosity is piqued by seeing that, although the camera itself specifies that ISOs of 8000 and higher are extended, neither the technical specifications nor the manual do. B

The tech specs list the ISO setting range as 200 - 25600, plus a low extended setting, but the camera warns the user selecting 8000 (or higher ISOs) that this is an 'extension'.

Please note, I am not asking what extended ISO is. I am wondering why the camera itself, and the technical data, would describe certain ISO settings differently. The camera describes five of the possible ISO settings (which are given as 8000, 12800, etc., as if they were ISO-compliant ISO settings) as 'extended'. However the manufacturer's technical data lists the ISO range as if those were ISO-compliant ISO settings (plus a 'low' extended setting clearly indicated both in camera and in the technical specifications, as being 'approximately 100').

I am very curious, as it seems that the printed information - which potential purchasers might read - is not as complete as one might wish. Could it be that the numbered high extended ISOs are close to standard and most users wouldn't notice issues? Or am I missing something about why the camera would be designed to clearly identify five numbered ISO settings as 'extended' while the technical specifications do not?

  • Possible duplicate of What does "expanded ISO" mean? – Itai Oct 9 '17 at 16:20
  • Cheers, but, no. I have edited my question to try to make it clearer that my question is about why the camera itself calls five ISO settings extended, while the technical specifications do not. The tech specs list the ISO setting range as 200 - 25600, plus a low extended setting, but the camera warns the user selecting 8000 (or higher ISOs) that this is an 'extension'. – user59085 Oct 9 '17 at 16:52
  • 2
    Perhaps the change was made in the spec sheet/manual later than the camera software could be changed, or vice versa. Or, the people writing the tech specs and the people writing the software just got their signals crossed. It seems unlikely that we'll know what the real answer is without talking to someone who was actually involved. – Caleb Oct 9 '17 at 19:28
5

Because "tech specs" are sales and marketing documents meant to fulfill checkbox requirements or look good in comparisons. Calling out some of the ISO range as limited or specialized does not advance that goal. On the other hand, the camera settings and help exist to help you make the best choices for your photographic situation, so more information is helpful there.

I don't think there is any more to it than that.

  • Thanks. Beause I am also interested in which is correct, I ended up e-mailing Olympus, who have confirmed that the camera's info that these are extended ISOs, is correct. For what it's worth, I do think it's too bad that someone considering whether to purchase this camera based on the tech specs, won't have all the correct info. – user59085 Oct 11 '17 at 8:06

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy