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I want to take a photo of a long chime 52"x6" and make it look closer. What type of camera and lens should i use. Right now i have a Canon Power Shot SX530 HS. the chime looks too far away and you can't see any detail.

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Got closer. There is no real distance in a photo, only people see something as being more distant. The more the object occupies the frame, the closer it will look. Frame tightly, or crop if you must and have enough resolution left for your needs.

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Your problem has nothing to do with camera of lens performance. The Power Shot and most all other modern miniature cameras sport a rectangular format that is ratio 1:1.5. Translated, the length is 1.5 multiplied by the width. The object you wish to image has a ratio of 52÷ 6 = 8.6 written as 1:8.6.

This object ratio of 1:8.6 means; if you display it on a computer screen or make a print on paper, the resulting image would be quite rectangular. Suppose you positioned the camera to make a print whereby the 6 inch width reproduced 2 inch wide. If this were so, then the length of the object would span 17.2 inches. In other words, it is impossible to render this object, so that it shows detail unless the imaging material (paper or monitor) is super elongated.

Hard to grasp? Suppose you image the Empire State Building. It is super tall but narrow (compared to it’s height). You can photograph and you can display the image of this building on a single sheet of paper or on a computer screen, but, you will not see detail like bricks or gargoyles. Best you face facts and show a outlying view followed by a close-up or two that show detail. Advanced graphic artist would likely show a faraway view that showed the whole. Then with clever art, allow the viewer to place the mouse over any areas to show a magnified view with detail of that portion of the image.

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